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10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 132. Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura is a visual artist based in Austin with a diverse multi-media practice. She received her BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from UT Austin. Teruko has exhibited in the U.S. and Mexico, and has completed three temporary public art installations in the last year.  She is currently a member of ICOSA art collective, a participant in the City of Austin’s Launchpad program for public art, and one of three Austin artists featured in the 2017 TX Biennial.

More information on https://www.terukonimura.net/

https://pin.it/yxkjxalfuul4ck

Copyright @ Teruco Nimura

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WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 127. KAWS

Born in 1974 in Jersey City, NJ, USA

Lives and works in New York, USA

Considered one of the most relevant artists of his generation, KAWS engages audiences beyond the museums and galleries in which he regularly exhibits. His prolific body of influential work straddles the worlds of art and design to include paintings, murals, large-scale sculptures, street art, and graphic and product design. Over the last two decades KAWS has built a successful career with work that consistently shows his formal agility as an artist, as well as his underlying wit, irreverence, and affection for our times. He often draws inspiration and appropriates from pop culture animations to form a unique artistic vocabulary for his works across various mediums.

Now admired for his larger-than-life sculptures and hardedge paintings that emphasize line and color, KAWS’ cast of hybrid cartoon and human characters are perhaps the strongest examples of his exploration of humanity. His refined graphic language revitalizes figuration with big, bold gestures and keen, playful intricacy. As seen in his collaborations with global brands, KAWS’ imagery possesses a sophisticated humor and reveals a thoughtful interplay with consumer products. Highly sought-after by collectors inside and outside of the art world, KAWS’ artworks, with their broad appeal, establishes him as one of the most prominent artists in today’s culture.

KAWS (b. 1974, Jersey City, New Jersey; lives and works in Brooklyn, New York) has exhibited internationally in major museums. His recent solo exhibitions include KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2016) which traveled to the Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); KAWS, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Longside Gallery, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (2016). His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2017); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga, Spain (2014); Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas (2013); Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia (2013); and the High Art Museum, Atlanta, Georgia (2011).

His monumental sculptures have been shown in prestigious locations including the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, United Kingdom and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

KAWS Is Bringing a Giant Floating Figure to Seoul’s Seokchon… https://hypebeast.com/2018/6/kaws-holiday-seokchon-lake-seoul-korea

COPYRIGHT @ by KAWS

Originally published on https://www.perrotin.com/artists/Kaws/55/view-of-the-exhibition-where-the-end-starts-curated-by-andrea-karnes-at-modern-art-museum-of-fort-worth-fort-worth-usa-2016/10000012698

#art #installation #kaws #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog #ArtForYou

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 120. LIZA RAYN

LIza RAYN

born in 1965 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Ryan earned a BFA at Dartmouth College, (New Hampshire) in 1987 and an MFA from California State University, Fullerton in 1994. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Liza works in photography, video and mixed media. Her interest in the use of visual metaphor remains constant throughout her bodies of work.The J. Paul Getty Museum, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, California) are among the public collections holding works by Ryan.

Copyright @ Liza Ryan

http://www.lizaryan.com

#lizarayn #auction #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 18. SONDRA PERRY

Sondra Perry is an American artist who was born in 1986. Sondra Perry has had numerous gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. There have been numerous articles about Sondra Perry, including ‘Sondra Perry’s Typhoon wrenches my soul but Ian Cheng’s AI is merely soulless – review’ written by Jonathan Jones for The Guardian in 2018.

Masks and Global African Art, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, 2015; A Curious Blindness, Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, New York (2015); Of Present Bodies, Arlington Arts Center, Arlington VA (2014); and Young, Gifted, & Black: Transforming Visual Media, The Camera Club of New York (2012). Perry performed Sondra Perry & Associate Make Pancakes and Shame the Devil at the Artist’s Institute, New York, in 2015. The artist’s work has been screened at venues such as Les Voutes, Paris, France; Light Industry, New York; Video Art and Experimental Film Festival, Tribeca Cinemas, New York; Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts Museum, Shenyang China; and LOOP Barcelona Media Arts Festival. Perry was a panelist at Black Artists on Social Media at the Brooklyn Museum, NY. In 2014 Perry was Guest Lecturer at the School of Visual Arts, New York, for the course History, Theory, and Practice of the Image. Perry has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Vermont Studio Center, Ox-bow, and the Experimental Television Center. Perry is currently based in Houston, Texas as part of the artist-in-residence program CORE at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Articles

https://frieze.com/article/we-might-not-need-another-hero-do-we-need-another-fair-middling-biennial

https://www.mutualart.com/Artist/Sondra-Perry/A53ED27C8C149F1C/Articles

http://www.mutualart.com/ExternalArticle/Sondra-Perry-Wins-Seattle-Art-Museums-20/EDDF97EB7293BC0B

Credit Photo illustration by Adam Ferriss. Source photograph by Jean-Erick Pasquier/Gamma-Rapho, via Getty Images.
Sondra Perry’s ‘TK (Suspicious Glorious Absence)’ at the Serpentine Gallery CREDIT: HEATHCLIFF O’MALLEY
Credit Photo illustration by Adam Ferriss. Source photograph by View Pictures/UIG, via Getty Images.
Sondra Perry, “Graft and Ash for a Three Monitor Workstation” (still, 2016, courtesy of the artist)
Installation view of Typhoon Coming On (© 2018 Mike Din, photo courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery)

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #115. ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

Born 1969 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. She lives and works in Berlin and Almaty.

Artist Statement

“My educational background is in the Soviet Russian, avant-garde school of Futurism, which I combine with the nomadic aesthetic of post-Soviet, contemporary Kazakhstan that I have been exploring in recent years through photographic and video work.

I use specific modes of expression in modern and contemporary art as a vehicle to investigate my personal archaic atavism as a certain mystical anthropomorphism. In other words, I explore the nature of a specific Egregore, a shared cultural psychic experience, which manifests itself as a specific form of thought among the people(s) of the ancient, arid and dusty Steppes between the Caspian Sea, Baikonur and Altai in today’s Kazakhstan.

In the Russian language, Archaic Atavism is personalised as a being — which points to and creates a different meaning. We are not just speaking about an idea or archaic element in the collective subconscious of a people, but about the embodiment of our archaic atavism, which becomes an active entity, just like a creature itself. Our archaic atavism is not just internalised, but also externalised. It is as if It, like a being, has been awakened by the post-Soviet experience of the indigenous Kazakh people, who are becoming their own after 80 years of Soviet domination and cultural genocide. Suddenly, It (Archaic Atavism) became interested in enculturation and in modern behaviours. It also began to have entertaining dialogues with the trans-national circulation of ideas in contemporary art.

For this dialogue, I have chosen the medium of video and photography, and like to work with the notion of memory and reality. My archaic atavism is interested in my video explorations in the Steppes and in post-Soviet Asia. By editing raw data and combining documentary and staged footage, I become Its voice, enabling a cultural exodus from long oblivion. My work raises metaphysical questions such as Who am I? and Where shall I go?; this (psychic) experience and perspective marks my artistic language.”

Almagul Menlibayeva’s recent notable exhibitions include a solo show at the Grand Palais in Paris (2016) and group shows Elective Affinities at the NCCA in Moscow (2015), BALAGAN!!! in Berlin (2015), Moscow Biennale (2015, 2011), The Union of Fire and Water at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), 18th Sydney Biennale (2012), 1st Kyiv Biennale (2012), 10th Sharjah Biennale (2011) and Unconditional Love at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009).

Please, find more information about Artist here

Watch “LOUIS VUITTON – ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/52163759?ref=em-share

Copyright by ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #114 . GUDA KOSTER

Guda Koster is a Dutch artist who creates living sculptures and performances, which the photographs are the results of. Koster’s works are created in parallels of time, space, and textile. In her works, Koster uses fabrics, colors, and patterns that underline the codes and meanings our clothing conveys

How would you describe your works? I make installations, sculptures, and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives, we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.

Please, read more about Artist Guda Koster here Videos on YOUTUBE

Copyright by Guda Koster

Indian summer

photo, work

2017, fotoprint, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

Stormy weather

photo, work

2017, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

One leg

photo, work

2017, photoprint

Size: divers

Happy?

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Just married

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Box

sculpture, work

2015, sculpture, karton, textiel, schoenen, paspop, 100 x 150 x 80 cm

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 113. NAUM GABO

Naum Gabo, original name Naum Neemia Pevsner (born August 5, 1890, Bryansk, Russia—died August 23, 1977, Waterbury, Connecticut, U.S.), pioneering Constructivist sculptor who used materials such as glass, plastic, and metal and created a sense of spatial movement in his work.

Gabo studied medicine and natural science, then philosophy and art history, at the University of Munich in Germany; he also took engineering classes at the Technical University in Munich. In 1913 he walked from Munich to Florence and Venice, viewing many works of art and architecture along the way. Early in his life he changed his name to Gabo in order to distinguish himself from his brother Antoine Pevsner, a painter.

While visiting Pevsner in Paris in 1913–14, Gabo met the artist Alexander Archipenko and others involved with the avant-garde. During World War I he lived with Pevsner in Oslo, Norway. There, Gabo produced his first Cubist-influenced figurative sculptures, exemplified by Constructed Head No. 2 (1916), which he executed in celluloid and metal. The brothers also began to experiment along the Constructivist lines laid down by their fellow Russian Vladimir Tatlin. Constructivist sculpture as practiced by Tatlin had definite political implications, but Gabo was more interested in its use of modern technology and industrial materials.

Returning to Russia after the Revolution, Gabo and Pevsner saw political forces redirect Russian art from exploration to propaganda. In 1920 the two brothers issued the Realistic Manifesto of Constructivism, which they posted and distributed in the streets of Moscow. In it they asserted that art had a value and function independent of the state, and that geometric principles should be the basis for sculpture. They advocated the use of transparent materials to define volumes of empty space instead of solid mass. In 1920 Gabo produced Kinetic Composition, a motor-driven sculpture that demonstrated his principles by incorporating elements of space and time.

Gabo left Russia in 1922 and lived for 10 years in Berlin, where he worked with László Moholy-Nagy and other artists of the Bauhaus. During the 1920s Gabo continued to create monumental constructions out of glass, metal, and plastic. In 1932 he went to Paris, where he joined the Abstraction-Création group, an association of artists that advocated pure abstraction. He lived in England from 1936 to 1946, promoting Constructivism there by editing the collective manifesto Circle in 1937 with the abstract painter Ben Nicholson. Curves replaced angles in Gabo’s new spatial constructions made of taut wire and plastic thread. He moved to the United States in 1946, and in 1953–54 he taught at the Harvard Graduate School of Architecture. During the 1950s Gabo received several commissions for public sculptures, only some of which he completed, such as the large commemorative monument for the Bijenkorf department store (1954, unveiled in 1957) in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

From Encyclopædia Britannica

http://www.all-art.org/Architecture/24-2.htm

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 111. Marina De Caro

Born in 1961 in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Body, behavior and space; intuition, sensitivity, and perception; experience and knowledge: these are the keywords of Marina De Caro’s work. De Caro develops her poetics from the field of drawing towards the realms of sculpture and performance. Her spatial and action-based works often incorporate soft wearable sculptures especially designed to invite the viewer/performer to experience an unpredictable regard on the every day, on bodily and social behavior and norms. In her drawings and experiences, De Caro disrupts the given, abruptly. A most refined and irreverent master in the use of color, her works also unfold as delicately poetic spatial entities that usually envelop the viewer in a particular novel ambiance and experience.

Copyright @ Marina de Caro

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 110. LIONEL SMIT.

Today I went through the exhibition of Emerging and Established Artist Lionel Smit at the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami Beach.

Lionel Smit was born in Pretoria, South Africa in 1982. He creates monumental portraiture works on canvas, sculpture, silkscreen, video and public installations. Smit’s work has been exhibited locally and internationally in prestigious galleries, art fairs, and public spaces. These include a solo exhibition at the Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki and various public sculptures of his being featured in the USA including Union Square, New York City.

Smit’s painting, Kholiswa, received the Viewer’s Choice Award as part of the BP Portrait Award 2013 at the National Portrait Gallery in London. He has been a featured artist at the Miami Art Fair 2014 and on the cover of Christie’s catalog in London 2009.

Recent exhibitions include Faces of Identity, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in London and Premise, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in Cape Town.

Please, find more information about the artist on https://www.lionelsmit.co.za/about

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 108. Donald Judd

One of the most significant artists of the twentieth century, the radical ideas, and work of Donald Judd continue to provoke and influence the fields of art, architecture, and design.Slide01

Born Donald Clarence Judd on June 3, 1928, in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, he served in the United States Army from June 1946 until November 1947. Before he transitioned to work in three dimensions, Judd began as a painter and an art critic, having studied philosophy and art history at Columbia University and painting at the Art Students League. He developed his idea of the permanent installation of his work and collections first in New York, at 101 Spring Street, and later in Marfa, Texas. Throughout his lifetime Judd advocated for the importance of art and artistic expression; he regarded land preservation, empirical knowledge, and engaged citizenship as fundamental aspects of society and he wrote extensively on these and other subjects.

donaldjudd_sculpture
Donald Judd, 15 Untitled Works in Concrete (Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas)

In 1968, Judd purchased his first building, 101 Spring Street, a five-story cast-iron building in New York. At Spring Street, Judd first began the permanent installation of his work as well as works of his contemporaries, a process he would continue throughout his life in both New York and Texas. Judd began to purchase properties in Marfa in 1973 where he would continue permanently installing his work and the work of others until his death in 1994. These spaces, including studios, living quarters, and ranches, reflect the diversity of his life’s work. Judd established the ideas of Judd Foundation in 1977, founded to preserve his art, spaces, libraries, and archives as a standard for the defense of his work. He founded The Chinati Foundation/La Fundación Chinati in 1986 specifically for the permanent installation of large-scale works by himself and his contemporaries.

For almost four decades, Judd exhibited throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia with his work in museum collections worldwide. Major exhibitions of his work include the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1968, 1988); the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (1975); Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (1970); and Tate Modern, London (2004). A major retrospective of Judd’s work is forthcoming at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/92490262&color=000000“>The Modern Art Notes Podcast: Conversation with CURATOR Marianne Stockenbrand. DONALD JUDD

https://juddfoundation.org/artist/biography/
Copyright © Judd Foundation

donald-judd-1991-c-b-mancia-f-bodmer-makUntitled Bernstein 88-17Installs_10Donald Judd, untitled, 1960. Oil on canvas. Donald Judd Art © Juddd93779d8

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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