What to collect #142. GISELA COLON

GISELA COLON (Canada, b. 1966) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Colon is an American contemporary artist who has developed a unique vocabulary of “organic minimalism,” breathing life-like qualities into reductive forms. Colon’s oeuvre encompasses several distinct sculptural forms: Pods, Slabs, Monoliths, and Portals. The through-line in all of Colon’s work is the concept of the “mutable object;” the sculptures are conceived as variable objects that transmute their physical qualities through fluctuating movement, varied lighting, changing environmental conditions, and the passage of time.

The Pods are created through a proprietary fabrication method of blow-molding and layering various acrylic materials, producing transformational objects that emanate light and color from within. 

Biography and images via https://www.giselacolon.com/

Copyright © GISELA COLON

* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request by email@artcuratoronline.com

How Much Is Your Object Worth? – Researching Your Art

Reposted from https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

It is hard to establish fixed values for antiques, artworks, and other collectible items. The amount asked or offered is determined by many factors, including the condition of the object, personal interests of both the seller and the purchaser, and trends in the market. According to Smithsonian Institution policy, no staff member may offer monetary evaluations. However, the following guidelines should help you find an approximate value for your artwork.

First, consult price guides to determine current sale and auction prices. Some price guides are available on the Internet, but most come in books or offline formats. Specialized university or art museum libraries and larger public libraries often carry these guides. Price indexes are usually published annually and cover international auctions and galleries.

PRICE GUIDES

ADEC: International Art Prices
Art Sales Index
Davenport’s Art Reference & Price Guide
International Auction Records
Leonard’s Annual Price Index of Art Auctions

For prints, check the following resources:

Gordon’s Print Price Annual
Contemporary Print Portfolio
Lawrence’s Dealer Print Prices International

ONLINE PRICING RESOURCES

invaluable.com

artprice.com

artnet.com

AskArt.com

FindArtinfo.com

MutualArt.com

APPRAISALS & APPRAISERS

Consider finding an appraiser to determine the value of your artwork. Appraisers are trained specialists who work for a fee. They evaluate your piece and give you a written statement of its value. Although the following organizations do not provide appraisals themselves, they each publish a directory of their members. Always seek an appraiser with an expertise in the type of artwork you own.

American Society of Appraisers
11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 310
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 478-2228 or 1-800-ASA-VALU
www.appraisers.org

Appraisers Association of America
212 West 35th Street, 11th Floor South
New York, NY 10001
(212) 889-5404
www.appraisersassoc.org

International Society of Appraisers
303 West Madison Street, Suite 2650
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 981-6778
www.isa-appraisers.org

AUCTION HOUSES

Some auction houses host free “open house” days where visitors can bring in their artworks and have auction-house staff members share their expertise. Other houses allow owners to mail their information with a photograph, and their experts will respond. To find an auction house in your area, search online for “fine art auction houses.”

Originally published on https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

WHAT TO COLLECT # 134. SIMONE LEIGH

SIMONE LEIGH

(b. 1967, Chicago)

lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo presentations of Leigh’s work have been hosted by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Studio Museum in Harlem (Marcus Garvey Park), New York; New Museum, New York (all 2016); Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Creative Time, New York (both 2014); and The Kitchen, New York (2012). The artist’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including the Berlin Biennial (2018); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, New Museum, New York (2017); Unconventional Clay: Engaged in Change, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Mo.; Greater New York, MoMA PS1, Long Island City (both 2016); The Dakar Biennial (2014); Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (traveled to Grey Art Gallery, New York; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco [2012–15]); The Whitney Biennial, New York (2012); 30 Seconds off an Inch, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2009); The Future As Disruption, The Kitchen, New York (2008); and Intersections: Defensive Mechanisms, Abrons Art Center, New York (2008). Her work has been recognized with awards and honors from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York (2018); Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2017); A Blade of Grass, New York (2016); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, New York (both 2016); Creative Capital, New York (2012); and the Joan Mitchell Foundation (2011).

https://www.simoneleigh.com/

On image: Exhibition | Simone Leigh: Haunting Race and Gender at Jack Tilton, New York

What’s Her Face Series, “Beaded Head”. 2012. Simone Leigh. Sculpture.

On image: Simone Leigh’s impactful show of new work at the Hammer Museum.

 

***All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 132. Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura is a visual artist based in Austin with a diverse multi-media practice. She received her BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from UT Austin. Teruko has exhibited in the U.S. and Mexico, and has completed three temporary public art installations in the last year.  She is currently a member of ICOSA art collective, a participant in the City of Austin’s Launchpad program for public art, and one of three Austin artists featured in the 2017 TX Biennial.

More information on https://www.terukonimura.net/

https://pin.it/yxkjxalfuul4ck

Copyright @ Teruco Nimura

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 127. KAWS

Born in 1974 in Jersey City, NJ, USA

Lives and works in New York, USA

Considered one of the most relevant artists of his generation, KAWS engages audiences beyond the museums and galleries in which he regularly exhibits. His prolific body of influential work straddles the worlds of art and design to include paintings, murals, large-scale sculptures, street art, and graphics and product design. Over the last two decades, KAWS has built a successful career with work that consistently shows his formal agility as an artist, as well as his underlying wit, irreverence, and affection for our times. He often draws inspiration and appropriates from pop culture animations to form a unique artistic vocabulary for his works across various mediums.

Now admired for his larger-than-life sculptures and hard edge paintings that emphasize line and color, KAWS’ cast of hybrid cartoon and human characters are perhaps the strongest examples of his exploration of humanity. His refined graphics language revitalizes figuration with big, bold gestures and keen, playful intricacy. As seen in his collaborations with global brands, KAWS’ imagery possesses a sophisticated humor and reveals a thoughtful interplay with consumer products. Highly sought-after by collectors inside and outside of the art world, KAWS’ artworks, with their broad appeal, establishes him as one of the most prominent artists in today’s culture.

KAWS (b. 1974, Jersey City, New Jersey; lives and works in Brooklyn, New York) has exhibited internationally in major museums. His recent solo exhibitions include KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2016) which traveled to the Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); KAWS, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Longside Gallery, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (2016). His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2017); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga, Spain (2014); Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas (2013); Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia (2013); and the High Art Museum, Atlanta, Georgia (2011).

His monumental sculptures have been shown in prestigious locations including the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, United Kingdom and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

KAWS Is Bringing a Giant Floating Figure to Seoul’s Seokchon… https://hypebeast.com/2018/6/kaws-holiday-seokchon-lake-seoul-korea

COPYRIGHT @ by KAWS

Originally published on https://www.perrotin.com/artists/Kaws/55/view-of-the-exhibition-where-the-end-starts-curated-by-andrea-karnes-at-modern-art-museum-of-fort-worth-fort-worth-usa-2016/10000012698

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***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com