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Wayne Thiebaud: ‘I Knew This Was Not a Good Career Choice’

 

‘I knew this was not a good career choice,’ says artist Wayne Thiebaud, interviewed in his sunny California studio. ‘Most of the painters I knew were just barely able to survive and had other jobs. But I don’t believe in the idea of success; when we surrender ourselves to that, I think we’ve lost something special.’

Find out more at http://www.christies.com/features/Way…

In spite, or perhaps because of this logic, Thiebaud is an immensely successful artist. ‘I was lucky,’ he reasons. When he decided to paint, he recalls asking himself ‘How do I do this?’ — realizing the answer was ‘with extreme difficulty.’ As an artist, continues Thiebaud, ‘you probably can’t make a living, but you can make a life.’

Thiebaud’s life is composed of ‘alternate universes’ — abstractions inspired by syncopation in music, and a desire to capture human touch. They are works ‘from memory, from imagination, all based on the audacious notion of being omnipotent. I’m a God,’ the artist laughs ‘This, for you, is my world to look at. Isn’t that great?’

 

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email
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WHAT TO COLLECT # 131. JOHN BROOKS

His work is playful, creepy, energising and anthropomorphic. Stare at these fuzzy wonders long enough and you would swear you saw a heart beat or a leg twitch. This small body of work packs a lot of punch both visually and conceptually. The work stands as a kind of strange timeline not just from one year of fashion to the next but a sort of endless amount of time in between.Brooks fuses weaving techniques into his textile based art pieces bridging that invisible gap between craft and conceptual art.

Please, find more information http://www.johnbrooks.com.au/new-page/

Copyright @ John Brooks

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 130. Anish Kapoor

Mirroring its surroundings to reflect a rose-tinted microcosm of ambient space, UntitledANISH KAPOOR - UNTITLED, stainless steel and paint, 120 by 120 by 27.5cm., Executed in 2010 is an exquisite example of Anish Kapoor’s inimitable investigation into the possibilities of interior and exterior space. Seeming to float effortlessly in suspense above the ground, Kapoor’s dish appears to simultaneously curve outwards and inwards, distorting perception and awareness as our gaze passes across it. The luminous reflectivity of the surface radiates light, and emits a sense of meditative calm and repose. Untitledinvites contemplation: by circumnavigating the work we become an integral part of the whole, thus making every viewer’s experience of the piece subtly different.
Untitled forms part of Kapoor’s iconic corpus of mirrored sculptures, in which the possibilities of the circular format in a range of reflective materials and colors are explored. The seductive red of the present work, however, is of particular significance. Kapoor has always considered red to be a highly symbolic color, and many of his most important large-scale works – such as Marsyas, My Red Homeland (both 2003) Past, Present, Future (2006) and Svayambh (2007) – have been executed in varying shades of red. Kapoor has spoken of the importance of red in his work: “I use red a lot… It’s true that in Indian culture red is a powerful thing; it is the color a bride wears; it is associated with the matriarchal, which is central to Indian psychology. So I can see what leads me there culturally, but there’s more to it. One of the ways color has been used in art since the Eighteenth Century is to move, as in Turner, from color to light. I tend to go from color to darkness. Red has a very powerful blackness. This overt color, this open and visually beckoning color, also associates itself with a dark interior world. And that’s the real reason I’m interested in it” (Anish Kapoor in conversation with Nicholas Baume in Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Anish Kapoor: Past, Present, Future, 2008, p. 31).

Untitled also invites connections with the idea of the Sublime, in particular, the post-modern version of the concept as posited by Jean-François Lyotard. Lyotard argued that certain examples of contemporary art sought to represent ideas or themes which were impossible to truly delineate in physical form, thus arousing sensations of awe and bewilderment in the viewer as we are forced to confront concepts our mind is unable to truly comprehend. Lyotard viewed the work of Barnett Newman – with its walls of pure color undisturbed by figural or objective concerns – as being the ultimate exponent of the post-modern Sublime; yet, Kapoor’s mirrored works arguably also fulfill the conditions of post-modern Sublimity in their profound exploration of complex theory and philosophy through a totally abstract dialectic. The shimmering surfaces and the curved space of the series of wall mounted mirror installations induce a corresponding sense of disorienting arrest, not only cognitively but also physically and spatially. Indeed, the Sublime has been of abiding fascination for Kapoor throughout his career, and he has frequently spoken of the idea about his mirrored works: “It seemed it was not a mirrored object but an object full of mirroredness. The spatial questions it seemed to ask were not about deep space but about present space, which I began to think about as a new sublime. If the traditional sublime is in deep space, then this is proposing that the contemporary sublime is in front of the picture plane, not beyond it. I continue to make these works because I feel this is a whole new spatial adventure” (Anish Kapoor quoted in ibid., p. 52). As an object of immense beauty and commanding authority, Untitled is a masterful encapsulation of Kapoor’s highly assured manipulation of spatial territory.

Originally published on Sotheby’s

Copyright © Anish Kapoor http://anishkapoor.com/

Another works by Artist

18d3fa1b69a429534f0f41199221c8685602b544bd99a03d651edba96931a7202470965488_194031df91b2abd7f15473e95f104338673328c28cef6ec9b762f0e7d16ac35e9c4a401421kapoor_inbetween04-Kapoor_Key-004_Yellow

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 128. Cristina Coral

Educated in Italy where she lives and works as a photographer.
Her approach to photography and its development was almost entirely self-taught.
She has lived her childhood in an artistic environment.
Her father was a composer, music and art have always been a very important part of her life. She has chosen the camera as my main artistic expression since 2012.

If you would like to know something more or for info about art purchases you can write to : cristinacoral@yahoo.it

Artworks by Cristina Coral are available as limited edition prints, professionally printed on museum quality archival paper.
I guarantee max. 20 or 10 copies of 1 artwork in different sizes as a limited edition.
Each artwork is signed and numbered on the reverse of the photograph and certificate.

Originally published here

Copyright © Cristina Coral

Cristina-Coral-2Cristina-Coral-10curtain_8_670DSC_0195_1340_cDSC_0984-copia_800

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 121. ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol

American, 1928–1987

Inspired by the portraits that Man Ray photographed of Marcel Duchamp’s alter ego, Rrose Sélavy, Andy Warhol created a series of drag self-portraits. Always questioning the conventions of constructed identity, Warhol donned a wig and bold makeup, subverting traditional gender expectations and paying homage to the artists before him.

Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981

Gelatin silver print

Image: 3.5 x 2.25 in. (8.89 x 5.72 cm.)

Sheet: 4.25 x 3.4 in. (10.8 x 8.64 cm.)

American Pop Art icon Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was known for taking photographic portraits of his many friends in and outside of the art world. The photographic medium was critical to Warhol’s artistic production, and he brought his camera with him wherever he went. His photographic oeuvre reads like today’s ubiquitous social media photo streams and provides a fascinating look into the life of an enigmatic figure whose influence on the art world, and society as a whole, is unparalleled. Playing with the notions of identity, perception, and one’s public versus private self, Warhol also took many poignant self-portraits, often in drag, as seen here.

Originally it was published on

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/andy-warhol/self-portrait-in-drag-8

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Visit to Basel 2018

Art, it is a good way to entertain when you have dinner with friends in your house – just like talking about expensive wine or travels you now can talk about your existing art experience. Art is always about stature.

With Art Significator You will be proud of your art collection.

Masha Melnik

From Art Basel, Switzerland

2018

Photo credit by Masha Melnik

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #114 . GUDA KOSTER

Guda Koster is a Dutch artist who creates living sculptures and performances, which the photographs are the results of. Koster’s works are created in parallels of time, space, and textile. In her works, Koster uses fabrics, colors, and patterns that underline the codes and meanings our clothing conveys

How would you describe your works? I make installations, sculptures, and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives, we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.

Please, read more about Artist Guda Koster here Videos on YOUTUBE

Copyright by Guda Koster

Indian summer

photo, work

2017, fotoprint, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

Stormy weather

photo, work

2017, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

One leg

photo, work

2017, photoprint

Size: divers

Happy?

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Just married

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Box

sculpture, work

2015, sculpture, karton, textiel, schoenen, paspop, 100 x 150 x 80 cm

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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The Woman Behind the First Photography Gallery

Helen Gee risked everything to open Limelight in 1954, selling prints by Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, and Robert Frank for less than fifty dollars each. Her tell-all memoir, Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, is now available from Aperture as an e-book. Here, Denise Bethel’s introduction offers a preview of the late Gee’s story.

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee, ca. 1954–1960

Courtesy Gary Schneider

Dear Helen,

I am writing to let you know that, sixty years on, some of the questions are still the same: who succeeds as a photographer? And, whose photographs sell? When you opened your first show at Limelight, in 1954, you linked those questions together for a new generation of collectors, and they’ve been linked that way ever since. Galleries had been selling art for centuries, but you wanted your gallery to be only about photography. This was an act of courage and an act of faith. Stieglitz sold photographs, and Julien Levy too, but they both offered other art as well. Now, look at what’s happened. In 2014, when I auctioned a sale of photographs for over twenty-one million, I wished you’d been there to see it. I was wearing some of your jewelry that night, given to me by two of your closest friends. There were prints in that auction that sold for tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars, many by some of the same photographers you’d struggled to sell for twenty or thirty or forty dollars a pop—Ansel Adams, Minor White, László Moholy-Nagy, Atget, Berenice Abbott, Gene Smith, Imogen Cunningham, Robert Frank, and more. The list is long. It’s ironic that one of your closing shows, the work of Edward Weston, saw some decent sales at seventy-five dollars a print. It’s all very different now. In my life as an auctioneer, I was as ambitious for the medium as you were, and finally, after years in the low-price trenches, I sold not one, but three photographs by Edward Weston for over one million dollars each.

In those long-ago days of the 1950s, you got into selling photographs through the back door: you were a painter who got hooked on photography, and you became a photographer yourself. You made money retouching photographs, enough money even to hire a secretary. And then you wanted to open a gallery. This was a time-honored route to becoming a dealer—through love of a subject—and in retrospect, it may have been the best one. You couldn’t help yourself, it was almost that simple. This was before photographs had much status in the marketplace, and before they could promise any return on the dollar. In 1980, when I got my first job in the photo trade, we called it “photographica.” Now, it’s “fine art photography,” and it’s a medium that’s sexy, a medium that’s hot, and that element of passion is not the determining factor it once was. Maybe that’s a shame. In 1954, you opened Limelight because you loved it, and you hoped that it would somehow, someway translate into money for food and rent.

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee retouching transparencies, 1955

Courtesy Collection Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

For anyone who loves photographs the way I do, your book is a fabulous roller-coaster ride. I love all that gossip and all that juice. People known to me only through their pictures are described by you in wacky detail. Your first photography teachers were Lisette Model and Sid Grossman—Sid kept your classes going on and on past midnight, endlessly pontificating on everything from politics to photo magazines. There were Robert and Mary Frank in their chaotic loft on Twenty-Third Street, boxes everywhere, hard to tell if they were moving in or moving out. The rugged Brett Weston, driving into Manhattan with a gun on his front seat. The tipsy Gene Smith, going from tavern to tavern in the wee hours, threatening to kill himself before he hung his show. The practical Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, glad to clear her husband’s clutter from her closets. Imogen Cunningham holding court at Limelight, giving Peter Hujar one perfect piece of advice. You even babysat the young Robert De Niro, an impossible-to-control toddler with no hint of famous actor in his future. Best of all is your scene with Edward Steichen in a kimono, chasing you around his apartment, putting the moves on. Let’s face it, Helen, you were a looker. But where did you find the guts to turn down Steichen, the most important person in the photography world at the time?

Arthur Lavine, Limelight premises (91 Seventh Avenue South at Sheridan Square) before renovation, February 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

These stories make your book a page-turner, and it would be a terrific musical: young woman finds a derelict nightclub in Greenwich Village, goes up to her neck in debt, strong-arms friends to help her plaster and paint, opens a coffeehouse–gallery, and the rest is history. Think of what a director could do with this scenario, Helen, think of the songs, the backdrops, the potential dance numbers—photographers in a cancan! Rain coming in through the broken skylights! We can look back and smile at some of this, but not at the tough parts, no—no, thank you. Let’s save the tough parts for the screenplay: the lawyer who cheated you, leaving you stranded . . . the times you faced bankruptcy . . . the crash course in the restaurant business, the endless staff turnover, the bookies in your apartment building, the union organizers who helped do you in. You wanted to figure out how to sell photographs, not how to work coffee machines. But it was food that kept Limelight going when the photographs didn’t sell, and so you had no choice—you figured it all out. That abandoned nightclub before you transformed it into Limelight—good grief. What exactly were you thinking? You recount it all with equanimity and sometimes, against all odds, with humor: the highs and the lows, the triumphs and the failures. And there’s not an ounce of self-pity in the narrative. It’s a lesson for all of us.

Arthur Lavine, Jerry Tallmer and Helen Gee (during renovations for Limelight), 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

When you did sell a photograph, and it didn’t happen often enough at first, you tell us candidly that it was nothing less than “an event.” You hung sixty shows in seven years, gave a lot of photographers their first exhibition, and created a special space, unique in the city then, for photography people to gather. For better or for worse, you brought photography back into the art market debate. Your shows were reviewed, with gravitas, in the New York Times and the Village Voice. One reviewer in the Sunday Times had the nerve to suggest that, for the modern world, photographs might just be more important than paintings. Whaaaaaat?! And so the controversy started up again, years after Stieglitz had thrown in the towel, and I’m writing to tell you that it’s going on still, today. I remember an Old Masters collector who walked into a photo auction preview by mistake. He was stunned when he saw the estimates. “Why, you can buy a good painting for what some of these things are worth!” he said to me, outraged. You just have to keep smiling, right?

Arthur Lavine, The first exhibition at Limelight featured the work of Joseph Breitenbach (and was installed by Sid Grossman), May 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

If you had just been able to hang on for a few more years, Helen, just a few. If you had just been able to figure a way around the union who tried to recruit your ragtag staff of part-time actors and out-of-work dancers. You were living one week to the next as it was, on borrowed time. Who could have predicted what the last straw would be, after all the creditors you’d dodged and all the photographers you’d cajoled? It’s heart-breaking to me that you closed when you did, because photography was about to move into the art world in a big, big way. Lisette Model introduced you to the young Diane Arbus, right at the end of your run. Grace Mayer brought by a Midwesterner named John Szarkowski—he was in town for a job interview at the Museum of Modern Art. Less than a decade after Limelight folded, Lee Witkin started down the trail you’d blazed: he opened his gallery in Manhattan, in 1969, and others followed. New York and London began to auction photographs in the 1970s, and slowly the prices went up. In 1989, I was in the room when a photograph broke that magic one-hundred-thousand-dollar ceiling at auction—an Edward Weston nautilus shell. Applause broke out, and all of us thought we’d hit the big time. Yet prices kept on going. In 2006, I was at the podium for the first photograph, classic or contemporary, to sell at auction for over a million dollars, $2.93 million, in fact. It was The Pond—Moonlight, a Pictorial tour de force by your old friend Edward Steichen. And again, I was wearing some of your jewelry that night, wishing you could be in the room to see it. What would you have thought if you had seen that $2.93 million in the press, who by then was jumping on every meteoric rise in price for photographs?

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee on the way to the opening of Limelight, May 13, 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

Does reading your book now, when so much has changed, make me miss those historic old times? It’s romantic to read about, Helen, but maybe not to have lived it. You had the strength of an ox. Now there are more of us in the business, and there is safety in those numbers. You were thrilled when Roy and Anne DeCarava opened a gallery in their apartment on the Upper West Side, because you knew it would be good for Limelight as well. It closed before you did, unfortunately. You tried new kinds of food to keep the doors open and reviewed endless portfolios for free, but it was always a cliff-hanger. In the 1950s, selling photographs was not the way to get rich, that’s for sure. You were far, far out on a limb.

Arthur Lavine, Opening party (Helen Gee and Peggy Tallmer in center), ca. 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

And, yes, there’s one more question your book brings up, and it’s a question, like the others, that’s still with us today: not who succeeds at selling photographs, but can it be a woman? Being a woman, Helen, might not have been the easiest way to start. When I climbed into the auctioneer’s box for the first time, I was the first female auction head of photographs to actually take a sale. (“You need to stand up in the podium, don’t sit down up there,” a friend recommended later, when he saw how the box engulfed me. “I am standing up,” I had to tell him. “I’ve been standing up for years.”) Although there are many—many—more women in the photo world today, we’re still outnumbered. And, to top it all off, in your Limelight years, you were not just a woman, you were a divorced single mom. You stayed up nights working, retouching photos, you worked when you were sick, you scrambled to find babysitters, you read all those books on raising children, you wanted your daughter to have the best. Thank you for being frank with us about trying to find the time to date and to make those tricky man-woman relationships work. How did you have any stamina left at all? For single moms out there, career moms with not much money, like you, I expect this may not have really changed.

Arthur Lavine, Exterior of Limelight, ca. 1954

Courtesy Collection Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

Helen, I’m such a fan. We don’t have enough in print about what it was like in the early days of the photo trade, and in your case, a memoir about the business has become a memoir about the medium itself. Although I adore all that gossip, my favorite parts of the book are your zingers about the lasting (or not!) value of the photographs and exhibitions of your day—your pages on The Family of Man, for starters. Your right-on comments about the whole photo scene can’t be paraphrased—and so I’ll leave it to new readers to discover for themselves your razor-sharp eye. You would have been a great critic, Helen, because you knew the medium from the inside, and you made it your business to know the people. I am in awe of what you did, and for taking the time and trouble to put it down on paper.

With all best wishes,

Denise Bethel, New York, January 2018

Denise Bethel, formerly Chairman, Photographs, Americas, Sotheby’s New York, is now an independent advisor, a writer, and a lecturer based in New York City.

Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, published by Aperture as an e-book, is available on Amazon and other e-book retailers.

Read the original article: https://aperture.org/blog/limelight-helen-gee/

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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INSPIRATION #150. PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION2PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION3PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION4PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION1PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION5PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION6PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION7PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION8PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION9PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION10Architectural PhotographyPHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION12PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION13PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION14PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION15PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION16PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION17PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION18PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION19PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION20PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION21PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION22PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION23PHOTO_INDESIGN_INSPIRATION24

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTOFAIR SFO. February 2018

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CUSTOM TILE DESIGN

Custom Tile and Interior design by Masha Melnik. Project 2017 year. San Jose, California private apartment.

PSY_BATHPSY_BEDROOM_2PSY_BEDROOM

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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MEDITATION & COLLECTING

One day, the meditation, became an important part of my work.

It is a special one -two – three moment of the inner peace which is bringing me to the essence of things. When I go deeper in my journey, the physical nature of the surroundings is disappearing and transforming into an art. That minutes I use for new ideas in my work and social study of my ego. But sometimes I continue to move forward with anticipation where the electrical web is transferring me over the time to find a substance of emptiscan_design_blog_43ness. I see a vertical timeline and just follow the impulse. That is for a who I am in the hierarchy and where is my zero balance is.

So, I love to collect rares. In the age of five, I found that if I have a pocket, it means I have to put something into it. So, from that days I kept looking for something meaningful and valuable for my collections. I can say that I was looking for a connection between me and subject. In general, I am a collector of someone experience.

The idea of each collection of art to build the relationships with someone story and to try to achieve the balance through the physical process. Same as I feel during my meditation and where I never stop looking for something new.

Masha Melnik.

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 1 Photo Murals by Masha Melnik in Design

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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.comroofbathroomcroproofbathroomlogoroofmoermchairlogo
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design www.mashamelnik.com
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Photo murals by Masha Melnik in Design

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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TOP 50 Interior Design Brands for Contemporary Living

The fact is that everyone has the desire to make his residence more comfortable and cozy because that is the only place where most people have to spend their whole life. Besides hiring an interior designer to give our homes appealing looks, we need to choose the curtains, furniture, kitchen wear, and other accessories wisely. It is essential to set the furniture as per the wall-paints so that an appealing and charming look is obtained. While making your selection of furniture, I am sure you would love what is graceful, attractive and affordable.
There is a list ofROCHE BOBOIS.jpg my favorite contemporary and remarkable  furniture brands are present in the world with respect to their origin and exclusiveness. I believe it will help you to get a furnished and modern Hollywood house from your dreams.

The Roche Bobois Group is considered today as the world leader in high-end furniture design and distribution, in addition to its elite positioning as a pioneer creator.
As a true testimony to its dynamism, Roche Bobois launches every six months an exclusive new collection and proudly ranks among the most talented furniture brands with an upscale international reputation.

http://pin.it/HON9IZW also check my Boho Chic board http://pin.it/YGI9cLl

Well-known for fusing classicism with modernism, Christopher Guy’s style can be described as “contemporary with classical values.” A singular vision and uncompromising sense of style and pursuit of elegance have driven Christopher to continually redefine the aesthetics of the design. http://pin.it/9hMSngT

BRABBU is a design brand that reflects an intense way of living, bringing fierceness, strength, and power into an urban lifestyle. We design and produce a diverse range of furniture, case goods, upholstery, lighting, rugs, art, and accessBRABBU.jpgories that tell stories of nature and the world. All these stories are written by the materials, textures, scents, flavors, and colors that live inside nature and inside the urban life. http://pin.it/Zj5mCI3

Innovation and imaginative design characterize this stylish range of tables, chairs, stools, etc. from Cattelan Italia. The quality of manufacture and elegance of style combine to bring a highly individual, distinctive and discriminating designer flair to your home.  http://pin.it/4Pa-WrK

EDRA is the synonyms of creativity which has established it as leader of change with amazing and astonishing designs and high-quality products following latest fashions and trends. It has considered as the reference point of the modern world and new designs, the intersection of modern technology and artistic traditions. EDRA catalog contains well crafted the unique and flawless range of furniture to cover every field of life from the environment to nature and comfortable bed to home along with executive offerings, added among the most expensive furniture brands in the world. http://pin.it/zN1kLeb

“A long ride, with a few obstacles and many challenges, from 1934 to the present. And the feeling that it is never enough… No, “knowledge” is not enough anymore, but we have a magnificent obsession for quality every day and in every detail.” – Molteni & C iconic style with unmistakable class. http://pin.it/90BKuhU

Poliform is a leading Italian furniture brand which offers a wide range of products including wardrobe and library system along with decorative collections like sofas, armchairs, beds and occasional furniture. It has been making the masterpieces since forty years to furnish the houses with its esteemed products and creations to mesmerize the people coming to the home. The Italian luxury modern furniture brand provides high-quality furniture and kitchen setting with customs cabinetry closets making it one of most expensive furniture brands in the world. http://pin.it/5DQeZKG

Boca do Lobo combines the past with present through technology by making masterpieces which can evoke emotions through its exclusiveness and sensational collection. BOCA DO LOBO.jpgThe contemporary designs of Boca do Lobo is all about modern lifestyle and high-end living standards that gave luxurious experience to its users and captivate the attention of guests in quite well manner. Boca does Lobo is one of most expensive furniture brand in the world which presents a wide range of home and office décor with all of the accessories to make them more impressive and incredible. https://www.pinterest.com/bocadolobo

Top designers, quality of manufacture and flexibility in product design, make Flou one of the world-leaders in bedroom systems. Most designs have the versatility to be adapted to a particular customer need. Give your bedroom a distinctive personal style .http://pin.it/Pc62UBH

Kartell is one of the symbols of Italian design around the world that has been founded in 1949 by Giulio Castelli, the leading furniture company is currently owned and operated by Claudio Luti. Kartell has made collaboration with most prestigious international designers to make products more appealing and mesmerizing while its collections became unique pieces through color, transparency, and unique shapes. It has been added to the list of most expensive furniture brands in the world while its products are recognizable all around the globe because of durability and endless. https://www.pinterest.com/kartelldesign

Since, 1989 Fendi Casa has manufactured the prestigious design objects that combine exclusivity and glamor, a passion for experimentation and creativity that ended up with unique and elegant furniture for which it has been added to the list of top most expensive furniture brand in the world. Fendi casa.jpgThe persistent quest of materials and excellence in craftsmanship make the collection of Fendi Casa more exceptional having excellence and innovative design. The collection contains a large variety of home furnishings, decorative lighting, and accessories while all of the creations are mostly handcrafted by Italian.
Board on Pinterest… http://pin.it/C9rexn9

Founded in 1972 by an innovative group of designers BD BARCELONA.jpgBD Barcelona has been offering highly distinctive, striking contemporary furniture designs for public and private living spaces for almost 40 years.
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Since Aurelio Zanotta founded the company over 50 years ago, Zanotta has integrated research, innovation, and design to create a highly successful brand now sought after in over 60 nations of the world. Quality is Zanotta’s watchword: in materials, design, and production. Safe, comfortable, reliable, aesthetically satisfying and distinctive, Zanotta is one of the Italy’s most prestigious brands. http://pin.it/yyEJL6x

Minotti has been at the top of Italian furniture design and manufacture for over 60 years and has built up a client base all over the world. They offer a comprehensive range for every room: beds, sofas, armchairs, stools etc. http://pin.it/CKFCV3N

SOFAS

Founded in 1946, Cappellini has been a driving force of Italian modernism for most of its existence. Their sofas, chairs, and tables have appeared in the collections of MoMA in New York, the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, and the Museum of Decorative Arts. Check my board on Pinterest http://pin.it/-xPvOnD

For nearly five decades, B&B Italia has dominated the contemporary furniture landscape and made major contributions to the history of Italian design. Dedicated to outfitting modern lives with sophisticated and timeless furnishings, B&B Italia collaborates with some of the world’s most renowned designers and architects, including Marcel Wanders, Naoto Fukasawa, and Nicole Aebischer. https://www.pinterest.com/bebitalia

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The historic sofa, armchair, and accessories manufacturer have undergone a modern transformation under the direction of Patrizia Moroso, daughter of the company’s founder. Creative partnerships with designers like Ron Arad, Marc Newson, and Patricia Urquiola have pushed Moroso into exciting new design territories. Today, celebrities and Middle Eastern royalty alike, adore the brand’s edgy designs and fresh vision. http://pin.it/O0USNlh

For 40 years Living Divani has been one of the Italy’s most dynamic and prestigious brands. Led since 1988 by architect/designer Piero Lissoni, simplicity and elegance of line with a keen eye for contemporary tastes have characterized the distinctive Living Divani house style. Building on their renowned reputation for high-quality upholstery, Living Divani now offers a full range of products to enhance all aspects of your living environment. http://pin.it/MNTAMzZ

PATIO & OUTDOOR

Based near Basel since 1950, Vitra sells iconic, design-led furniture to the world. Creative flair, quality in materials and manufacture, combine to create products to enhance our experience of the living environment in the home, office or public space. The Vitra philosophy is individual in focus: collections designed to form part of an organic collage of personal choice, not the imposed, packaged anonymity of a corporate or branded style. Vitra’s target is the discerning, discriminating, an independently-minded customer with a passion for quality.  http://pin.it/M1KP2Sl

Outdoors or indoors Ego Paris offers audacious, distinctive and exciting furniture from a new company set up in 2004 by the three brothers Sommereaux – Jean,
Yvan and Nicolas. The quality of materials and craftsmanship guarantee elegance and durability for Ego chairs, tables, beach/poolside recliners, etc. Quality wood, aluminum in a wide choice of finishes/colors empowers you to achieve the ultimate in personal style. http://pin.it/LTjcUgj

GOOD for KIDS

The American home-furnishing company Restoration Hardware was founded in 1979 in California which operated in the United States and Canada through 18 outlets in the States. One of the fastest growing and mostRH.jpg innovative luxury brands in the home furnishings Restoration Hardware operated a total of 59 galleries including specialized furniture for babies and children. RH is one of expensive furniture brand in the world which positioned as a lifestyle brand and design authority that offers dominant and innovative products.
Board on Pinterest… http://pin.it/JnJolzt

The circus was built under a dream. The dream is to allow children to dream their own dreams and to really give them space to be and live their fantasies and magical world. In a certain way, Circus is the ultimate proposition of being free, colorful, innocent, naïve and extremely “bubbly.” What Circus dreams to be is the pinnacle of fun, freedom, and life, introducing a new entire world and a new entire state of mind.

Gigi Brooks is a UK based luxury baby and children’s lifestyle brand dedicated to providing anyone with babies and children in their lives with an expertly curated collection of designer furniture, exquisite interiors, and unique gifts.
– See more at http://pin.it/OFBV9lo

Bambizi Kids traditional British craftsmanship and the best of modern kids furniture design, every piece in the range offers unrivaled quality, safety, and beauty. http://pin.it/snETBui

Home Accessories 

Best known for high-end fashion, Missoni remains a family-owned company with an international empire built on their signature brightly colored zig-zag fabrics. Aside from sweaters and dresses, Missoni also sells bedding, poufs. http://pin.it/4Zb3DC_

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Carlo Alessi founded the company, and it’s still a family-run operation, currently owned by Carlo’s son Alberto. They focus on the designer tabletop with — for lack of a better description — lots of shiny metal stuff. Alessi has international showrooms and a huge retail network. http://pin.it/BUKQNoO

KITCHENS, BATHROOMS & APPLIANCES
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In 1892 Friedemir Poggenpohl set up a small furniture company and showroom. His aim ‘To improve the kitchen.’ And ever since, generations of Poggenpohl craftsmen and designers have done exactly that.
The PoggenPOGGENPOHL.jpgpohl kitchen is built to order. Our designers start with a blank sheet of paper – and the customer’s brief. The home, tastes, and way of life of each client are considered before our skilled designers begin to create a kitchen that is precisely designed for space and the people who will use it. Every cabinet, drawer, and worktop are built to the precise dimensions of the customer’s home at our factory in Herford, right down to the last millimeter of space. That’s why every Poggenpohl kitchen is as individual as our customers are. https://www.pinterest.com/PinPoggenpohl

The story of success of the enterprise Schüller started in the year of 1965 when the first kitchen buffet was developed. Starting 1971 the first built-in kitchens were planned and produced. Continuously expanded during the years that followed, the former carpenter’s shop has now developed into an innovative enterprise, employing approximately 1240 people, belonging to the Top 5 kitchen manufacturers, and exporting kitchens all over the world. http://pin.it/x88BS-l

Porcelanosa does more than just make kitchen cabinets.  They also deal with bathrooms and tile.  But in the kitchen, Porcelanosa excels in the manufacture of sleek, smooth European-style cabinetry.  It also does manufacturer more traditional styles of cabinetry, as well.  Based in Spain, Porcelanosa runs a tight ship with over 400 showrooms across the globe–entirely company-owned.

If we take more detailed and careful look at ALNO, which is the German Design winner “Winner” 2016 in the category “Excellent Product Design – Kitchen” we will notice quite a remarkable innovations. Starting with the heat and scratch resistant, a natural material made from particles of oxides and silicide that is quite a something for sensible surfaces like the ones in the kitchen. Another noteworthy innovation is the opening of the cabinets – strongly resembling the lifting of sun blind – very practical for restrained spaces. Style and innovation – what better?

Bulthaup’s minimalist, purist yet sensual kitchen furniture is distinctive and full of character. Using high-quality materials their craftsmen pare function down to its essence, creating an integrated, balanced style. Direct from Italy to your own order, Contemporary Home offer prices that bring this uniquely satisfying range within reach. http://pin.it/DDaxyLd

The VIPP KITCHEN  is a design product that according to its creators is a result of 75 years long tradition of working with metal. Inspired by professional kitchens, they create this design more as a functional and cleverly placed instrument than as a decorative element of the interior. So in the end, the result is functionality, stylish outlook and high quality in one place.

Dada – Sleek and modern, Dada manufactures a range of designer kitchen cabinetry that reflects the latest contemporary trends from Europe. Bold and stylish, the streamlined designs will bring a sophisticated feel and a touch of cosmopolitan chic to your home.

THG PARIS, Known the world over for their specialized, unique bathroom faucets and accessories, THG never fails to express ultimate aesthetic beauty. Crystal appliqué faucet fixtures are this brand’s calling card, making every bathroom they are featured in more elegant as a result.tivalì.jpg

BOFFI is an international trendsetter in the world of bathroom design, and they’ve worked with greats like Joe Colombo. They maintain a New York showroom (designed by Piero Lissoni) in SoHo, as well as multiple European locations. http://pin.it/G4uLXB0

Bisazza Mosaico
One of the top luxury brands in the design sector and the industry’s leading producer of glass mosaic for interior and exterior decoration.
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Azulejos tiles You can use in many dynamic configurations; on the floor, as a part of the cabinetry or wall pattern, but only if the color scheme and compositional layout need a bit of refreshment and vitality. We don’t recommend their use in combination with wooden decoration. http://pin.it/1erOoUc

Lithos Design is the unrivaled Italian manufacturer of modular feature walls and flooring made of natural stone and marble for interior design. The Company was established in 2007 and is now acknowledged by the best international design firms for its design, innovation and quality standards, which epitomize the “Made in Italy” trademark, and especially as one of the leading companies who introduced the concept of industrial stone design.

A brand is like an enduring promise that needs to be fulfilled continuously. Miele adheres to this promise with the utmost commitment. For more than 115 years, Miele has stood for the highest product quality. Miele means durability, reliability, security, and peace of mind. As part of this philosophy, Miele avows itself to Germany as its center of production. Ninety percent of the total value creation is generated there. “Made in Germany” is a promise of quality and Miele strives to fulfill the high requirements of each customer and provide them with appliances of the highest quality and tested durability to make their lives more comfortable. From built-in coffee makers to the innovative steam oven, Meile continues to create must-have appliances.

Jenn-Air creates luxury appliances that are more than a facet of your kitchen – they make your house more of a home. Ranked #1 for the last four years in their creation of built-in refrigerators, Jenn-Air will never fail to impress guests in your home. http://pin.it/rzcYYXG

The dreaminess and beauty of Italian craftsmanship come to life with Officine Gullo. Each set is custom-created with the help of a team of design experts who create layouts and 3D renderings that can breathe life into your culinary visions. An Officine Gullo kitchen is the ultimate way to bring the epicurean experience of a Michelin Star restaurant home.

LIGHTING

FLOS a family-owned company based in Italy, with stores throFLOS.jpgughout Europe and America. The mid-century Arco Lamp, designed by the Castiglioni brothers, remains their biggest seller, but they also collaborate with contemporary designers like Marcel Wanders and Antonio Citterio. http://pin.it/cnqy78l

Moooi is an avant-garde Dutch design firm specializing in lighting, furniture, and textiles. Its designs, in collaboration with renowned designers including Marcel Wanders, Ross Lovegrove, and Jasper Morrison, are cutting edge, yet retain a playful character. Moooi is well known for its trendy and forward-thinking products featured in the company’s collections of lighting, furnishings, and accessories. http://pin.it/gjkJBAj

ARTEMIDE Italian lighting store was founded by Ernesto Gismondi in 1959, and now has locations throughout the world. They carry lamps by top Italian designers like Mario Botta, Enzo Mari, and Luigi Serafini, as well as non-Italian names like Philippe Starck and Norman Foster. https://www.pinterest.com/artemideworld

Meet DELIGHTFULL, a Portuguese lighting company that will spice up your rooms. DelightFULL’s world is about ambiance, history, moments that stay forever through lighting designs created by artisans with wisdom and passion for craftsmanship. https://www.pinterest.com/delightfulll

With their most recent and highly celebrated collection, Terzani has taken the next step in its evolutionary process – building from its position as an industry leader to create an incubator for the future of lighting where Terzani can focus on new ideas and continue to redefine the way luxury lighting is made. http://pin.it/wCQrmhO

Koncept lighting, international lighting design firm. Dynamic lighting designs to accentuate and complement any space. From conceptualization to reality, it all comes together at Koncept Lighting.

NEMO.jpgNEMO Lighting is one of the global leaders in lighting striving to constantly create innovative cutting edge design. The collection of the contemporary design includes models conceived by Carlo Forcolini, Jehs + Laub, Javier Mariscal, Karim Rashid, Ilaria Marelli, Foster+Partners, Hannes Wettstein and Roberto Paoli. Contemporary and simultaneously timeless, NEMO fixtures add a touch of luxury to modern spaces. http://pin.it/4K7s-Is

Established in 2002, Tom Dixon is a British design and manufacturing company of lighting and furniture. With a recognized commitment to innovation and a mission to revive the British furniture industry, the Tom Dixon brand is inspired by the unique heritage, the individualistic innovation and the robust, no nonsense engineering of these small islands. In 2004 Proventus, the Swedish-based private investment company, teamed up with Tom Dixon to establish Design Research, a design and product development holding company. Tom Dixon launches new collections annually at the Milan international furniture fair and product is sold across 61 countries. http://pin.it/abdOE6h

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Posted on

Organic Bar at Boston 

Inviting Mother Nature into the home through home design is an exceptional way to get back to basics while infusing a house with warmth, color, purpose, and practicality. We were originally organic, to begin with, so why not keep up the tradition of peace, harmony, and health.

Design, Inspiration and Photography Masha Melnik and Anastasia Ber, 2014


***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com