Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Link to share: Myths that stop people from buying art https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

WHAT TO COLLECT # 141. Riccardo Mayr

Riccardo Mayr was born and raised in Ferrara (Italy) a small city, which carries in its streets and buildings the marks of a glorious past.

During the sixteenth century, the cities of the province of Italy’s region Emilia-Romagna —although mostly small in population—were vibrant and quite distinctive, artistically and culturally. The three principal centers, Ferrara, Bologna, and Parma, were especially so, and each had a unique trajectory in both politics and the arts. Ferrara was home to one of the most important humanist courts in the Renaissance, which is known as the Este dukes.
Although small in size, Ferrara was a crucible of Renaissance thought and art. Throughout the fifteenth century, its rulers, the Este family, commissioned works from the greatest contemporary painters, including Giovanni Bellini, Fra Bartolommeo, Raphael, Titian, and Dosso Dossi.

Riccardo grew up in an early Baroque family palazzo located in the center of the city, which is over 500 years old.  The Palazzo has belonged to the Mayr family for more than 200 years.

This “big building” and courtyard garden is like a real time capsule hosting paintings covering a 500 year period collected by Riccardo’s ancestors.  The objects of art, pieces of ancient furniture and family memorabilia ranging from the XVI to the XX Century are a tangible testimony of ancient times, peoples and events.  Living in the Palazzo, surrounded by such tangible testimony of ancient times, he grew up deeply affected by the sense of the passing of time, by century’s old accumulation of dust, by the colors and smells of time.

In the late nineties, while completing his studies as an architect at the University of Ferrara, a couple of casual events marked his sudden and crucial interest in contemporary art. First, in the Palazzo, he would watch his mother learn the technique of oil painting from a Ferrara artist and painter, Emanuele Taglietti collaborator of Riccardo for this project, who himself seemed as if he would visit the palazzo from a past era. 

The second casual event was the visit of the Venice Biennale of 1997 and the casual encounter with the work of such artists as Anselm Kiefer and Christian Boltanski.

From that moment on, Riccardo was not just an architect but also a self-taught painter.

During the nineties to learn how to paint Riccardo started to use unusual materials such as rust, charcoal, ash, lead, iron and mirror debris, materials of his home surroundings. This then brought him to paint with continuity and starting exhibit in Italy and abroad.

Recently, Riccardo’s mother who had been the stoic and ever-present matriarch of the Mayr family and palazzo died of cancer.  The passing of his mother, as well as his father many years prior, required that Riccardo and his sister manage the affairs of the Mayr estate including the collection of paintings put together by their ancestors during the last 200 years. Riccardo was overwhelmed with the daunting task of managing the Mayr estate and deciding the future of the Mayr family.  Riccardo would pace through the palazzo with its big, dark, and treasure-filled rooms, pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family.

Riccardo asked himself if he had to accept passively the relentless passing of time and the succession of the generations. He would ponder if there were anyway, any scenario whereby he could jam this pitiless biological mechanism, even just for a moment.  He would turn his sight to the walls around him, rows of ancient paintings, the testimony of an unquestionable pastime, events, landscapes, and mute portraits of ancestors would stare back at him.  He began thinking about the sense of sacrifice inherent in the religious paintings of the family collection, which is similar to any parent’s sacrifice on behalf children; religious themes, ancient beliefs and offerings for relief.

At one point, Riccardo reminisced about his childhood, running through the sequence of Baroque rooms of the palazzo playing for what seemed like endless games of hide and seek, impersonating characters of the first Star Wars movies, of good versus evil, the bad and the good chasing each other with cardboard light sabers. He thought about his son, now 11 years old who has become his own Star Wars enthusiast, playing like Riccardo would in the same palazzo 35 years earlier in what seems to be the atemporal playground of the Mayr family house and garden.

It was at that point or moment of torment and mourning of his mother, that period of contemplation pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family, that Riccrado connected the dots between his past and present, between centuries old visual art traditions of Ferrara and the cinematic culture we are embedded with cross-culturally today. Riccardo realized there are links between the religious art of the family paintings and the commercial art of the Star Wars saga; both addressing the meaning of sacrifice on behalf of others, redemption and the human need for repentance.

This is the genesis of what is unveiled in this painting project, titled “Religious paintings of the expanded galaxy”  Riccardo commissioned the Ferrara painter who traveled from another era to teach his mother painting techniques and together they created a new technique which integrates into original paintings from the 17th and 18th Century fictitious elements and characters taken from the popular culture of our times, the Star Wars saga. In so doing, the project represents religious faith and ethics in what it is yet a post-modern paradigm largely embedded in fictional reality through an already generational long exposure and fascination with successful science fiction movies.  We also give back to figurative oil paintings a new path to a concept of truth. 

Mayr_Manchildstarwars

*All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 138. Pao-Leng Kung

Art Description by Artist Pao Leng Kung

In my works, I magnify some elements during the working process: the erasure of color, the relationship between positive and negative spaces, and the space inside and outside the canvas.

Typically, I use ‘ white’ as a force to expand unlimited space or as an emptiness to fill all the colors by imagination. Also ‘ white’ could refer to the white of exhibition space, gesso, and the natural canvas. Because of this, it opens far more possibilities to transfer the undefined space inside and outside of my paintings.

For the other colors and stripes, they serve as multiple roles within complicatedly interactive layers and transition between positive/ negative spaces. They are the main body that constructs the base for the whole picture, while they are too supporting roles that step by step builds up the existence of negative space.

PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_2PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_3PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_4PAO LENG Kung_abstract painting_151327-studyformeschers-ellsworthkelley2c1951

Copyright@Pao Leng Kung

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from the on request at any time.

10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence?

Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence? Christie’s Will Test the Waters This Fall

The auction house is selling an AI-produced work of art for the first time this fall.

• Naomi Rea 3 days ago

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

Christie’s New York will make history this fall when it becomes the first auction house to sell a work of art made by artificial intelligence. The print on canvas, a product of an algorithm developed by the French art collective Obvious, will be included in the auction house’s prints and multiples sale October 23-25.

Hugo Caselles-Dupré, a member of the Paris-based collective, told artnet News that they were “interested in the philosophical approach behind this,” he said. “Can an algorithm be creative? If so, this algorithm is the closest to the human mind’s creativity.”

The work was created using a model called a Generative Adversarial Network. The artists first fed a generator a dataset of 15,000 portraits done between the 14th and 20th centuries. It then created new works based on the training set until it was able to fool a test designed to distinguish whether an image was made by human or machine.

The resulting work, titled Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, depicts a man in a dark coat and white collar with indecipherable facial features that reside somewhere in the uncanny valley. The unique piece, a gold-framed canvas print that is currently on view in Christie’s London showroom, is estimated at $7,000-10,000. The collective says it will use the proceeds from the sale to further train its algorithm, finance the computational power needed to make such works, and experiment with 3D modeling.

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

The Christie’s sale constitutes an important validation in the realm of AI art. Although there are many so-called “creative coders” who use similar technologies to improve web experience, few are considered contemporary artists. The members of Obvious see themselves as conceptual artists whose main goal is to democratize Generative Adversarial Networks and legitimize AI-produced art.

“We wanted to propose this new approach to a more traditional market rather than the tech area,” Caselles-Dupré said. “At the beginning it was difficult to be understood by the traditional art market because they were looking at us like, ‘Who are those guys? What is this new weird stuff?’ But the more we’ve explained what we’re doing, what we want to share, and what we want to say, the more the art world is paying attention to our work.”

Following the Christie’s sale, Obvious plans to work with brands and galleries to expand the movement. “We really believe that AI can be a new tool for art,” Caselles-Dupré said. “In 1850, when the camera showed up, it was only used by highly qualified engineers and so it was not considered for its artistic potential. We think we are in the same situation, because people view us as engineers but we really think this type of technology will be used more and more in art.”

Installation view of Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy (2018).

The collective began a conversation with Christie’s following a London symposium on the implications of blockchain for the art world. “Christie’s continually stays attuned to changes in the art market and how technology can impact the creation and consumption of art,” said the auction house’s head of prints and multiples, Richard Lloyd, in a statement. “AI has already been incorporated as a tool by contemporary artists and as this technology further develops, we are excited to participate in these continued conversations.”

Edmond de Belamy is one of 11 portraits of the fictional Belamy family, which is named after Ian Goodfellow, the AI researcher who invented the Generative Adversarial Network method in 2014. (“Goodfellow” roughly translates to the French bel ami.) Another portrait from the family, Le Comte de Belamy, sold to Parisian collector Nicolas Laugero-Lassere earlier this year.

Originally published on the artnet News

https://news-artnet-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/news.artnet.com/market/artificial-intelligence-christies-1335170/amp-page

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #123. ALEX GARANT

Internationally renown as the Queen of Double Eyes, Alex Garant studied visual arts at Notre-Dame–De-Foy College just outside Quebec City. After graduating in 2001, she ultimately settled in Toronto, Canada.

She decided to indeed commit to her passion for Arts after suffering from a heart attack in 2012, changing forever how she would see the world.

As a pioneer of Contemporary Figurative Op Art, her oil paintings offer a graphic quality combined with traditional portrait techniques. Garant establishes herself as one of the leaders of analog Glitch Art by using patterns, duplication of elements,  symmetry and image superposition as crucial elements of her imagery.  Alex Garant’s paintings are indeed conversation pieces as they are meant to engage the observers in an image investigation process and hopefully enlist their senses differently while doing so.

Alex has shown works in Art Galleries all over Canada and the U.S., Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York as well as Australia and Portugal. Her works have also been shown at The Fullerton Museum and The Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH) in California. She has been featured on CB;  her works have been seen in Magazines including hi-fructose, Juxtapoz, BAZAAR, Le Petit Voyeur, Tattoo Fest Magazine, The Art Education Journal, Beautiful Bizarre Magazine and on multiple online platforms including VICE, The Huffington Post, Buzznet, ViralNova, Tory Burch Trends and many more.

Copyright @ Alex Garant

Find out more about the Artist on https://www.alexgarant.com

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik