3 Recommendations to Emerging Artists

Through my routine work days, I see a lot of frustration around. Every day I am receiving messages from artists with only one request: please, help me sell my art.

I could outline some practical steps for people to succeed in selling, but let’s be realistic: there is no right answer, one person’s strategy can be useless for another. Let’s focus on three general recommendation that should and will work today for emerging artists.

First of all, I am going to recommend all artists to become more independent and to find a job to earn a living, maybe outside of the art world. Dear Millennials, you need to stop waiting and dreaming, everything is much more challenging than you expect. Look to the real economy, do research: how many galleries closed in your town for the last two years? How many Art Institutes are closed around the world? You will see that we are experiencing a downturn in the middle- and a lower-priced art market. It is better to understand that real collectors are not investors, they buy art for personal satisfaction and enjoyment. Collectors have appreciated your talent, but they will not donate to your talent at list, there are no other conditions.

Second, be more precise in the way you’re expressing your ideas in art. Your masterpieces need to be academically creative and clearly, reflect your idea if you want it to be marketable today. Now is not the best time for “multi-meaning”, non-sellable or non-affordable emerging art. Art is not just about the talent of the artist. It is a whole science, including sales skills, self-representation and a deep understanding of psychology. Make sure your subject is sharp.

Finally, my third recommendation, start to learn how to support your art by yourself. Develop your Instagram, use it to display your environment and background to your benefit. Be intelligent and more transparent on social media: art curators and collectors are checking your backgrounds each day. Continue to pursue your passions, revolutionize the process of making art, explore science and technologies, learn the basics of art marketing.

Dear artists, the art industry has run into some changes, and it is not your fault. The economy wheel is spinning around, and soon we will see a new cycle and a more supportive art market. I am sure that professionals in the art industry will find the best solutions for you, and we all continue working in the new settings.

My best wishes,

Masha

What to collect #142. GISELA COLON

GISELA COLON (Canada, b. 1966) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Colon is an American contemporary artist who has developed a unique vocabulary of “organic minimalism,” breathing life-like qualities into reductive forms. Colon’s oeuvre encompasses several distinct sculptural forms: Pods, Slabs, Monoliths, and Portals. The through-line in all of Colon’s work is the concept of the “mutable object;” the sculptures are conceived as variable objects that transmute their physical qualities through fluctuating movement, varied lighting, changing environmental conditions, and the passage of time.

The Pods are created through a proprietary fabrication method of blow-molding and layering various acrylic materials, producing transformational objects that emanate light and color from within. 

Biography and images via https://www.giselacolon.com/

Copyright © GISELA COLON

* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request by email@artcuratoronline.com

Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Link to share: Myths that stop people from buying art https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

WHAT TO COLLECT # 138. Pao-Leng Kung

Art Description by Artist Pao Leng Kung

In my works, I magnify some elements during the working process: the erasure of color, the relationship between positive and negative spaces, and the space inside and outside the canvas.

Typically, I use ‘ white’ as a force to expand unlimited space or as an emptiness to fill all the colors by imagination. Also ‘ white’ could refer to the white of exhibition space, gesso, and the natural canvas. Because of this, it opens far more possibilities to transfer the undefined space inside and outside of my paintings.

For the other colors and stripes, they serve as multiple roles within complicatedly interactive layers and transition between positive/ negative spaces. They are the main body that constructs the base for the whole picture, while they are too supporting roles that step by step builds up the existence of negative space.

PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_2PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_3PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_4PAO LENG Kung_abstract painting_151327-studyformeschers-ellsworthkelley2c1951

Copyright@Pao Leng Kung

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from the on request at any time.

Why Love Generative Art? Article by Jason Bailey

Over the last 50 years, our world has turned digital at breakneck speed. No art form has captured this transitional time period – our time period – better than generative art. Generative art takes full advantage of everything that computing has to offer, producing elegant and compelling artworks that extend the same principles and goals artists have pursued from the inception of modern art.

Geometry, abstraction, and chance are important themes not just for generative art, but for all art of 20th Century. As an art historian and an amateur generative artist, I see a clear line of influence on generative art starting from Cézanne and shooting straight through to the:

  • Fracturing of geometry in Analytical Cubism

  • Emphasis on technology, machine aesthetic, and mechanized production from Futurism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus

  • Introduction of autonomy and chance in Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism

  • Anti-figurative aesthetic, bold geometry, and intense color of Neoplasticism, Suprematism, Hard-edged Abstraction, and OpArt

  • Use of algorithms by Sol Lewitt and others

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_501″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 510.78125px”>  Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth  - Hilma af Klint, 1907

Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_523″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 475px”>  Suprematist Composition -  Kasimir Malevich, 1916

Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_541″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 392.953125px”>  Circles in a Circle  - Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_560″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 400px”>  Highway and Byways  - Paul Klee, 1928

Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_578″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 380px”>  Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)  - Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_597″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 410.203125px”>  Concentric Squares  - Josef Albers, 1941

Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941