ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

Visit to Basel 2018

Art, it is a good way to entertain when you have dinner with friends in your house – just like talking about expensive wine or travels you now can talk about your existing art experience. Art is always about stature.

With Art Significator You will be proud of your art collection.

Masha Melnik

From Art Basel, Switzerland

2018

Photo credit by Masha Melnik

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #115. ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

Born 1969 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. She lives and works in Berlin and Almaty.

Artist Statement

“My educational background is in the Soviet Russian, avant-garde school of Futurism, which I combine with the nomadic aesthetic of post-Soviet, contemporary Kazakhstan that I have been exploring in recent years through photographic and video work.

I use specific modes of expression in modern and contemporary art as a vehicle to investigate my personal archaic atavism as a certain mystical anthropomorphism. In other words, I explore the nature of a specific Egregore, a shared cultural psychic experience, which manifests itself as a specific form of thought among the people(s) of the ancient, arid and dusty Steppes between the Caspian Sea, Baikonur and Altai in today’s Kazakhstan.

In the Russian language, Archaic Atavism is personalised as a being — which points to and creates a different meaning. We are not just speaking about an idea or archaic element in the collective subconscious of a people, but about the embodiment of our archaic atavism, which becomes an active entity, just like a creature itself. Our archaic atavism is not just internalised, but also externalised. It is as if It, like a being, has been awakened by the post-Soviet experience of the indigenous Kazakh people, who are becoming their own after 80 years of Soviet domination and cultural genocide. Suddenly, It (Archaic Atavism) became interested in enculturation and in modern behaviours. It also began to have entertaining dialogues with the trans-national circulation of ideas in contemporary art.

For this dialogue, I have chosen the medium of video and photography, and like to work with the notion of memory and reality. My archaic atavism is interested in my video explorations in the Steppes and in post-Soviet Asia. By editing raw data and combining documentary and staged footage, I become Its voice, enabling a cultural exodus from long oblivion. My work raises metaphysical questions such as Who am I? and Where shall I go?; this (psychic) experience and perspective marks my artistic language.”

Almagul Menlibayeva’s recent notable exhibitions include a solo show at the Grand Palais in Paris (2016) and group shows Elective Affinities at the NCCA in Moscow (2015), BALAGAN!!! in Berlin (2015), Moscow Biennale (2015, 2011), The Union of Fire and Water at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), 18th Sydney Biennale (2012), 1st Kyiv Biennale (2012), 10th Sharjah Biennale (2011) and Unconditional Love at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009).

Please, find more information about Artist here

Watch “LOUIS VUITTON – ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/52163759?ref=em-share

Copyright by ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector by Sylvain Levy.

Building art collections has always been a diverse and a personal adventure. Today we can add a new profile to the different types of collectors: the entrepreneurial collector.

Original article: 6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector https://blog.vastari.com/the-entrepreneurial-collector-sylvain-levy-dsl/

All the fields of our society are impacted by individuals who has invested in changing history, not just making money. Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Jeff Bezos are among these entrepreneurs focused on change.

How can art collectors be inspired by Elon Musk’s disruptive thinking? Below, I’ll share 6 points that should always be considered by the entrepreneurial collector.

1. A collection needs a vision

Any entrepreneur wishing to make it big must first put everything into their vision. They must believe in the project before anyone else does. They must love the brand before anyone else starts to. In the words of Nobel Laurate Dennis Gabor, “The future cannot be predicted, but futures can be invented.”

As for us [at DSL], our vision is to build a timely and timeless collection with a very strong cultural identity. We can only achieve this goal by being clear, authentic and giving a soul to a collection

2. A collection must always be on the move, aiming for the stars with feet on the ground

In a six-year period, Elon Musk accomplished what can be considered a titanic entrepreneurial crusade. He founded SpaceX in 2002 and Tesla Motors in 2003, both companies achieving their first major victories in 2008.

As for a collection it should always greatly challenge its time by the choice of collected works but also by how those works want to impact the audience and the collector..

Dslcollection is constantly surfing on the wave of Chinese contemporary art and the wave of technology. We were among the first ones, to be be present on internet since 2005, to have 2D and 3D museums, a second life museum in 2012 and today a virtual museum.

3. Don’t let failure defeat you

Musk does have several failed attempts to his name. Not every idea that he’s pursued has been an instant success. The first three launches at SpaceX were failures, and the Tesla Roadster took three years to become commercially viable even after the engineering was already foolproof.

It means for a collector to risk failure by constantly challenging the status quo or collecting works out of their comfort zone.

Unfortunately more and more collectors, because of basing their collections on investment criteria, prefer to play it safe

By focussing on China, we [DSL] have deliberately positioned ourselves out of our comfort zone

4. Craziness is an important part of an entrepreneurial culture

Yes, Elon Musk’s ideas are crazy. But so were Steve Jobs’s ideas, Bill Gates’s ideas, Benjamin Franklin’s ideas.

As for us, we built a collection in 2005 which only focussed on Chinese contemporary art – when we live 12.000km from China, we do not speak Chinese and there was not any institution validation.At the time, many would have considered this to be a crazy idea.

We had to think outside of the box and invent new ways to have access to the works (especially by using WeChat to stay informed!)

5. Criticism and self reflection

Elon solicits criticism and seeks out his critics to converse with them. This shows how important self-reflection can be to help one grow.

A collection should always interact with its audience and the art eco -system surrounding it. Sharing through social networks, and being open to feedback is an inspiring way to make a collection always lively and relevant.

Today Dslcollection has more than 31,000 followers on Linkedin with whom a dialogue is established through daily posts

6. A breakthrough innovation, it is rarely one little thing. It’s usually a whole bunch of things that collectively amount to a huge innovation

A collection should live in the context of the world in which it is built. To be innovative is not just about collecting emerging artists. It is also about harmoniously bridging humanities, art and science. That is the sense of the dslcollection project we have built the past 13 years.

Conclusion

Musk’s passionate obsession is an inspiration for anyone wanting to achieve something extraordinary. His focus, discipline and style are powerful antidotes against the mediocrity and complacency that creep up after routine settles in.

If you have a vision to transform a whole industry,if you are one of those who doesn’t like to play it safe, then there is a lot you can learn from Elon Musk, even as an art collector or art industry professional.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 113. NAUM GABO

Naum Gabo, original name Naum Neemia Pevsner (born August 5, 1890, Bryansk, Russia—died August 23, 1977, Waterbury, Connecticut, U.S.), pioneering Constructivist sculptor who used materials such as glass, plastic, and metal and created a sense of spatial movement in his work.

Gabo studied medicine and natural science, then philosophy and art history, at the University of Munich in Germany; he also took engineering classes at the Technical University in Munich. In 1913 he walked from Munich to Florence and Venice, viewing many works of art and architecture along the way. Early in his life he changed his name to Gabo in order to distinguish himself from his brother Antoine Pevsner, a painter.

While visiting Pevsner in Paris in 1913–14, Gabo met the artist Alexander Archipenko and others involved with the avant-garde. During World War I he lived with Pevsner in Oslo, Norway. There, Gabo produced his first Cubist-influenced figurative sculptures, exemplified by Constructed Head No. 2 (1916), which he executed in celluloid and metal. The brothers also began to experiment along the Constructivist lines laid down by their fellow Russian Vladimir Tatlin. Constructivist sculpture as practiced by Tatlin had definite political implications, but Gabo was more interested in its use of modern technology and industrial materials.

Returning to Russia after the Revolution, Gabo and Pevsner saw political forces redirect Russian art from exploration to propaganda. In 1920 the two brothers issued the Realistic Manifesto of Constructivism, which they posted and distributed in the streets of Moscow. In it they asserted that art had a value and function independent of the state, and that geometric principles should be the basis for sculpture. They advocated the use of transparent materials to define volumes of empty space instead of solid mass. In 1920 Gabo produced Kinetic Composition, a motor-driven sculpture that demonstrated his principles by incorporating elements of space and time.

Gabo left Russia in 1922 and lived for 10 years in Berlin, where he worked with László Moholy-Nagy and other artists of the Bauhaus. During the 1920s Gabo continued to create monumental constructions out of glass, metal, and plastic. In 1932 he went to Paris, where he joined the Abstraction-Création group, an association of artists that advocated pure abstraction. He lived in England from 1936 to 1946, promoting Constructivism there by editing the collective manifesto Circle in 1937 with the abstract painter Ben Nicholson. Curves replaced angles in Gabo’s new spatial constructions made of taut wire and plastic thread. He moved to the United States in 1946, and in 1953–54 he taught at the Harvard Graduate School of Architecture. During the 1950s Gabo received several commissions for public sculptures, only some of which he completed, such as the large commemorative monument for the Bijenkorf department store (1954, unveiled in 1957) in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

From Encyclopædia Britannica

http://www.all-art.org/Architecture/24-2.htm

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