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Check out the best kept secrets to buying art as an investment.

Check out the best kept secrets to buying art as an investment by Saatchi Art.

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10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 133. Danielle Cohen

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

I am trying to test the body and fuzziness as they appear in my private life, I deal with gender, pain, relationship or entity.
I Especially enjoyed testing the limits of suffering, the border between Erotica pornography and documentary as well as the line between the
personal and intimate private and public spheres. I test my conflict with myself many times in feminine and seductive that is far away from my own self-image and gender when I ascribe to a new image that I create diverse deflections that are associated with such dissemblance.

I disguise myself a lot, but always in order to reveal, sometimes up to the  stem cells and nerves, and the friction with the viewer is
somewhere between pleasure and pain, exciting and delightful.
My occupation with boundaries is almost obsessive , I can say decisively that there is an interface between art and my personal life, and I can hardly separate the two. I place myself in situations that are discomforting to me  and even threaten me, and the discomfort I feel brings out of me something that I feel  Satisfied with.

Images from collection: FASHION & FINE ART

Find more on https://www.daniellecohendinar.com/

Copyright © Danielle Cohen Dinar

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 132. Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura is a visual artist based in Austin with a diverse multi-media practice. She received her BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from UT Austin. Teruko has exhibited in the U.S. and Mexico, and has completed three temporary public art installations in the last year.  She is currently a member of ICOSA art collective, a participant in the City of Austin’s Launchpad program for public art, and one of three Austin artists featured in the 2017 TX Biennial.

More information on https://www.terukonimura.net/

https://pin.it/yxkjxalfuul4ck

Copyright @ Teruco Nimura

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 131. JOHN BROOKS

His work is playful, creepy, energising and anthropomorphic. Stare at these fuzzy wonders long enough and you would swear you saw a heart beat or a leg twitch. This small body of work packs a lot of punch both visually and conceptually. The work stands as a kind of strange timeline not just from one year of fashion to the next but a sort of endless amount of time in between.Brooks fuses weaving techniques into his textile based art pieces bridging that invisible gap between craft and conceptual art.

Please, find more information http://www.johnbrooks.com.au/new-page/

Copyright @ John Brooks

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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10 Secrets for Promoting Your Art on Instagram

by Madelaine Buttini December 07, 2017

Using social media platforms, like Instagram and Facebook, to share your art is a great way to promote your creations online. We now have the opportunity to share our artworks at to millions of people in real time!

You never know where a post will lead your career and what opportunities you may receive in return. I have had great benefits from using Instagram and really wanted to share with you my top ten secrets for promoting your art on this much loved platform.

Connect Your Instagram with Your Facebook Page

You get some awesome insight features when you connect your Instagram to your Facebook page. Once you have done the integration you will have a much better understanding of your Instagram page!

This can be helpful when you are trying to work out what time is best to post and on what days. You can also see other useful information such as the amount of impressions, reach, profile views, website clicks and email clicks your page has generated in the past seven days. If you wanted to dig a little deeper you can also see this for individual posts to get a grasp of what people are liking most — this can be done over a 2 year period.

I also love how it tells in depth information about your followers, such as the percentage of men to women, the top locations and age range. This can be particularly great when you are starting out with your online store or website. You know what your main demographic and audience is and where they may come from!

Read Instagram’s advice on integrating your pages together here.

Use Popular & Relevant Hashtags

I think this is a really important part of promotion no matter how large or small your brand is. Hashtags have become an integral way that we share our photos to other people we may not necessarily cross paths with online.

On my collage posts I use the terms #collageart #collage_art #contemporarycollage #australianartist, this way when people go to these hashtags they are more likely to come across my art.

Research other artists like yourself and find what terms they use, incorporate some of the hashtags they use into your posts and see what works best. This could have the potential to increase your reach and impressions for you Instagram page! But of course, like anything it is really trial and error, so switch it up.

Post High Quality Images of Your Art

Nobody likes to see low quality anything, it can be difficult to interpret and hard to vibe off. The same is for Instagram, no one wants to view low quality photographs or videos of your art. Always make sure to take photos at the highest resolution!

Pssst… if you are using an iPhone turn on HDR.

If you are making digital collages, always make sure the images you use are at the highest resolution and the size of your “canvas” is at it’s highest dimensions. I recommend using the dimensions: 1080 x 1080 px and at 200 dpi.

A little note for posting images: People seem to prefer square images over rectangular!

What will happen if you hound your followers to buy your art!

Don’t Always Try To Sell To Your Followers

I know that it’s awesome when you make a sale from a follower on Instagram, but that’s not what they are there for! Yeah, you have beautiful art to offer but you don’t always have to shove it in their faces. It can be really tempting to push for sales (everyday) but it will only hinder them from wanting to purchase and they may unfollow you.

If you are lacking in sales maybe they don’t know about your online store yet. So definitely do a post here and there about your products but not all the time! Limit it to once a week and make sure your website is easily visible in your about me section of your Instagram.

Give Your Followers Love

Your followers are those you should be nurturing, they are not only potential customers but they give your art the love it needs online.

I always recommend giving love to new followers, those who comment and like your posts. Simply give them a like on a few of their photos so that they will feel like the love is reciprocated!

Start Your Own Hashtag

I highly recommend this one! If you haven’t already started using your own hashtag, what a perfect time to start doing so. It’s an easy way for people to view your work and to start a “trend”.

I have my own hashtag, #madbutt which I put on every collage post and check daily. It’s great when you see people sharing your work and using that hashtag – it means you’re really getting your work out there!

Post Frequently Throughout The Week

This is really up to your own discretion and if you have the amount of work to share. I recommending post at least three times a week, minimum. I know of artists who post three things a day, seven days a week and for me I think that could be a little overbearing for some people who follow me. It’s definitely up to what you feel comfortable doing!

Posting is all about consistency too. For example you could post on Monday, Tuesday and Friday. You can always double check if that works well with the stats you collected from your Instagram Insights!

If you don’t have a lot of work to post, don’t worry — use this as motivation to get your body of work at a larger size and start posting!

Write Interesting & Captivating Captions

People will be drawn into your beautiful creations and would like to hear a little bit about what it means to you and how you relate back to it. Sometimes you don’t even have to write about anything!

It could always be a cool title of your work, what music you are digging that day or an inspirational quote. But either way, think of something just as creative as the work you made and don’t forget to use your hashtags!

Tag Your Favourite Art Relevant Pages

I think this a great way of getting Instagram art blogs and profiles to view your art and hopefully reposted (yay, free promotion)! Find some of your favourite pages on Instagram and go through who they are following to see what other pages you might like.

If you need inspiration I recommend pages like @taxcollection, @ratedmodernart and @love.watts.

Now you don’t want to tag them in your caption, you want to tag them in the image itself so it’s viewable on their profile under the tagged section. You can do this while you are posting the image (just hit edit and tag people).

Be Authentic & Don’t Hesitate

The best thing to do in the end is just be yourself, some people will love you and some people might not. You can’t control their feelings and it’s inevitable that people might disagree with what you say or what you create.

That is the beauty in being an artist — you get to express yourself! Don’t hesitate to express yourself and be who you are. As long as it’s positive there is nothing to worry about!

So, that’s my ten secrets for promoting your art on Instagram. I hope you find them useful and helpful for your own Instagram! Happy posting everyone.

x Madbutt

Originally published on

https://madbutt.com.au/blogs/madbutt/tips-on-promoting-your-art

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 126. Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky – “A Late Bloomer”

Considered to be the father of abstract art, Wassily Kandinsky was what might be considered  “a late bloomer” concerning his art. Born to a family of musicians, he learned to play the piano and cello. When he was 20 years old he chose to study law and economics and attended the University of Moscow where he lectured and also wrote about spirituality. At the age of 30, Kandinsky left Moscow and went to Munich to study life-drawing, sketching and anatomy. At the age of 37 (which was at one time considered “middle aged”) he had his first exhibition. The artist’s unrelenting quest for new forms fueled his passion for painting almost until his death in 1944, at the age of 78.

Kandinsky once remarked, “The spirit, like the body, can be strengthened and developed by frequent exercise. Just as the body, if neglected, grows weaker and finally impotent, so the spirit perishes if untended.”

As these artists remind us, it is important to follow our hearts, know what we are born to do, and nourish our creative spirit. Even when we encounter periods of withdrawal we must find the way to reclaim it.

Article originally published on

“Famous Artists Who Reclaimed Their Artistic Passion” By Renee Phillips https://www.healing-power-of-art.org/?p=1387

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT #123. ALEX GARANT

Internationally renown as the Queen of Double Eyes, Alex Garant studied visual arts at Notre-Dame–De-Foy College just outside Quebec City. After graduating in 2001, she ultimately settled in Toronto, Canada.

She decided to indeed commit to her passion for Arts after suffering from a heart attack in 2012, changing forever how she would see the world.

As a pioneer of Contemporary Figurative Op Art, her oil paintings offer a graphic quality combined with traditional portrait techniques. Garant establishes herself as one of the leaders of analog Glitch Art by using patterns, duplication of elements,  symmetry and image superposition as crucial elements of her imagery.  Alex Garant’s paintings are indeed conversation pieces as they are meant to engage the observers in an image investigation process and hopefully enlist their senses differently while doing so.

Alex has shown works in Art Galleries all over Canada and the U.S., Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York as well as Australia and Portugal. Her works have also been shown at The Fullerton Museum and The Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH) in California. She has been featured on CB;  her works have been seen in Magazines including hi-fructose, Juxtapoz, BAZAAR, Le Petit Voyeur, Tattoo Fest Magazine, The Art Education Journal, Beautiful Bizarre Magazine and on multiple online platforms including VICE, The Huffington Post, Buzznet, ViralNova, Tory Burch Trends and many more.

Copyright @ Alex Garant

Find out more about the Artist on https://www.alexgarant.com

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram

7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram
ELENA SOBOLEVA
MAY 15TH, 2015 3:17 PM

Following up on part one of our Instagram survey (How Collectors Use Instagram To Buy Art), which brought to light the importance of this social media channel as a tool for sales, we are excited to share the second half of our findings for galleries, which focus on how collectors want to be engaged on Instagram.

1. Collectors on Instagram Expect a Human Touch.

Collectors want personality. 70% of collectors prefer to follow an individual’s Instagram account (belonging to the gallery owner or staff) over the general gallery account. Nearly half of surveyed collectors want to follow gallery owners directly.

Create separate accounts for the gallery owner and staff. Developing individual accounts in tandem with the gallery’s main one will allow for more personal interaction with potential clients, feedback, and an opportunity to start a conversation.

Tip: The official gallery account can (and should) be used for gallery-wide updates, and is great for branding, but collectors crave the inside scoop. Great examples include Andrea Rosen, Zach Feuer, and James Fuentes.
2. Collectors Use #Hashtags Before They Buy.

Among surveyed collectors who use Instagram, 42% claim they often (or very often) look up an artist’s hashtag (#ArtistName) before purchasing their work. Only 6% say they never do this, meaning that 94% of collectors search by hashtag at some point.

#Hashtags enable collectors to instantly aggregate an artist’s content and also reveal public support for an artist. Curators, influencers, and press who have posted their works serve as another seal of approval for collectors. Include artist hashtags to highlight your latest inventory, studio views, and related content.

Tip: Use hashtags specific to an event or area (i.e. #FriezeNY), but don’t overwhelm your followers. Include your gallery hashtag (i.e. #DavidZwirner, #WhiteCube) on brochures and other marketing materials. Visitors to openings and events who use this “official” hashtag serve as brand ambassadors for your business.

#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by  Clemens Kois for Artsy.
#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by Clemens Kois for Artsy.

3. Convert Followers to New Collectors.

Our survey found that nearly half of collectors (46%) are most likely to follow gallery accounts they have already purchased work from. Still, over half follow gallery accounts they either view as tastemakers (27%) or from whom they want to buy (27%).

To capitalize on this purchase intent, make sure your Instagram bio includes contact details so collectors can reach you. Include a physical gallery address, your gallery’s official hashtag, and a link to your website (or your Artsy profile, whichever is a better collector experience).

Tip: To make your bio stand out, format your text outside of Instagram and copy + paste it back into Instagram. We recommend the Notes app, which allows you to add line breaks and special characters.

4. Collectors Want Your Attention.

A common complaint from collectors is that their comments and questions are often ignored, potentially turning them off a gallery. Make it a habit to reply to comments (setting a daily reminder helps), and offer to continue the conversation with potential buyers offline. Additionally, browse through images that others post of your artists and gallery (see #2 above) and like or comment where appropriate. Going the extra mile to engage collectors is a no-brainer. If you don’t already have a social media associate, consider hiring an intern for a 3-month test.

Tip: Maintain the quality of your account by deleting inappropriate or spammy comments on your Instagram photos. On an iPhone, click the comment icon to access the comments, swipe to the left on the comment, and click the trash icon.

5. Make Your Artists Collaborators.

Because collectors actively research and follow artists on Instagram, consider involving artists you represent in collaborations or account takeovers leading up to an opening. Find creative ways to involve your artists with account takeovers, meetups, and hashtag projects to give your followers more personal experiences.

Tip: Collectors told us that they want to follow accounts that show personality, but offer a balance. Check out Artsy’s #ArtWorldSpaces campaign for ideas.
6. Think Globally, Post Locally.

Following closely behind “an imbalance of photos” (posting too much of one type of photo), over-posting was the second most popular reason collectors said they would unfollow someone. We recommend posting a maximum of twice per day and scheduling your posts with purpose. Posting at the wrong time (for most of your followers) means that your content is less likely to be viewed, and much less engaged with.

Tip: Use the “two birds, one stone” adage, and aim to reach key locations during primetime: If you have galleries in NYC and Rome, posting by 6 PM makes sense, but midnight doesn’t.

7. Post Content That Collectors Want To See From Galleries.

When asked what they enjoy most about a gallery’s Instagram feed, more collectors chose “behind the scenes content” (i.e. studio visits and installation day) than “museum shows,” “art fair coverage,” “announcements,” and “gallery views” combined! At a close second was “first look at new inventory.”

And a final note to put things in perspective: While the platform’s influence on art buying behavior is clearly growing, Instagram is but one additional outlet for your digital content. Instagram should be a part of your content strategy and not its own end. Use it for what it is, and don’t forget to enjoy the process!

Originally posted on ARTSY

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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Visit to Basel 2018

Art, it is a good way to entertain when you have dinner with friends in your house – just like talking about expensive wine or travels you now can talk about your existing art experience. Art is always about stature.

With Art Significator You will be proud of your art collection.

Masha Melnik

From Art Basel, Switzerland

2018

Photo credit by Masha Melnik

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #115. ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

Born 1969 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. She lives and works in Berlin and Almaty.

Artist Statement

“My educational background is in the Soviet Russian, avant-garde school of Futurism, which I combine with the nomadic aesthetic of post-Soviet, contemporary Kazakhstan that I have been exploring in recent years through photographic and video work.

I use specific modes of expression in modern and contemporary art as a vehicle to investigate my personal archaic atavism as a certain mystical anthropomorphism. In other words, I explore the nature of a specific Egregore, a shared cultural psychic experience, which manifests itself as a specific form of thought among the people(s) of the ancient, arid and dusty Steppes between the Caspian Sea, Baikonur and Altai in today’s Kazakhstan.

In the Russian language, Archaic Atavism is personalised as a being — which points to and creates a different meaning. We are not just speaking about an idea or archaic element in the collective subconscious of a people, but about the embodiment of our archaic atavism, which becomes an active entity, just like a creature itself. Our archaic atavism is not just internalised, but also externalised. It is as if It, like a being, has been awakened by the post-Soviet experience of the indigenous Kazakh people, who are becoming their own after 80 years of Soviet domination and cultural genocide. Suddenly, It (Archaic Atavism) became interested in enculturation and in modern behaviours. It also began to have entertaining dialogues with the trans-national circulation of ideas in contemporary art.

For this dialogue, I have chosen the medium of video and photography, and like to work with the notion of memory and reality. My archaic atavism is interested in my video explorations in the Steppes and in post-Soviet Asia. By editing raw data and combining documentary and staged footage, I become Its voice, enabling a cultural exodus from long oblivion. My work raises metaphysical questions such as Who am I? and Where shall I go?; this (psychic) experience and perspective marks my artistic language.”

Almagul Menlibayeva’s recent notable exhibitions include a solo show at the Grand Palais in Paris (2016) and group shows Elective Affinities at the NCCA in Moscow (2015), BALAGAN!!! in Berlin (2015), Moscow Biennale (2015, 2011), The Union of Fire and Water at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), 18th Sydney Biennale (2012), 1st Kyiv Biennale (2012), 10th Sharjah Biennale (2011) and Unconditional Love at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009).

Please, find more information about Artist here

Watch “LOUIS VUITTON – ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/52163759?ref=em-share

Copyright by ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

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6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector by Sylvain Levy.

Building art collections has always been a diverse and a personal adventure. Today we can add a new profile to the different types of collectors: the entrepreneurial collector.

Original article: 6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector https://blog.vastari.com/the-entrepreneurial-collector-sylvain-levy-dsl/

All the fields of our society are impacted by individuals who has invested in changing history, not just making money. Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Jeff Bezos are among these entrepreneurs focused on change.

How can art collectors be inspired by Elon Musk’s disruptive thinking? Below, I’ll share 6 points that should always be considered by the entrepreneurial collector.

1. A collection needs a vision

Any entrepreneur wishing to make it big must first put everything into their vision. They must believe in the project before anyone else does. They must love the brand before anyone else starts to. In the words of Nobel Laurate Dennis Gabor, “The future cannot be predicted, but futures can be invented.”

As for us [at DSL], our vision is to build a timely and timeless collection with a very strong cultural identity. We can only achieve this goal by being clear, authentic and giving a soul to a collection

2. A collection must always be on the move, aiming for the stars with feet on the ground

In a six-year period, Elon Musk accomplished what can be considered a titanic entrepreneurial crusade. He founded SpaceX in 2002 and Tesla Motors in 2003, both companies achieving their first major victories in 2008.

As for a collection it should always greatly challenge its time by the choice of collected works but also by how those works want to impact the audience and the collector..

Dslcollection is constantly surfing on the wave of Chinese contemporary art and the wave of technology. We were among the first ones, to be be present on internet since 2005, to have 2D and 3D museums, a second life museum in 2012 and today a virtual museum.

3. Don’t let failure defeat you

Musk does have several failed attempts to his name. Not every idea that he’s pursued has been an instant success. The first three launches at SpaceX were failures, and the Tesla Roadster took three years to become commercially viable even after the engineering was already foolproof.

It means for a collector to risk failure by constantly challenging the status quo or collecting works out of their comfort zone.

Unfortunately more and more collectors, because of basing their collections on investment criteria, prefer to play it safe

By focussing on China, we [DSL] have deliberately positioned ourselves out of our comfort zone

4. Craziness is an important part of an entrepreneurial culture

Yes, Elon Musk’s ideas are crazy. But so were Steve Jobs’s ideas, Bill Gates’s ideas, Benjamin Franklin’s ideas.

As for us, we built a collection in 2005 which only focussed on Chinese contemporary art – when we live 12.000km from China, we do not speak Chinese and there was not any institution validation.At the time, many would have considered this to be a crazy idea.

We had to think outside of the box and invent new ways to have access to the works (especially by using WeChat to stay informed!)

5. Criticism and self reflection

Elon solicits criticism and seeks out his critics to converse with them. This shows how important self-reflection can be to help one grow.

A collection should always interact with its audience and the art eco -system surrounding it. Sharing through social networks, and being open to feedback is an inspiring way to make a collection always lively and relevant.

Today Dslcollection has more than 31,000 followers on Linkedin with whom a dialogue is established through daily posts

6. A breakthrough innovation, it is rarely one little thing. It’s usually a whole bunch of things that collectively amount to a huge innovation

A collection should live in the context of the world in which it is built. To be innovative is not just about collecting emerging artists. It is also about harmoniously bridging humanities, art and science. That is the sense of the dslcollection project we have built the past 13 years.

Conclusion

Musk’s passionate obsession is an inspiration for anyone wanting to achieve something extraordinary. His focus, discipline and style are powerful antidotes against the mediocrity and complacency that creep up after routine settles in.

If you have a vision to transform a whole industry,if you are one of those who doesn’t like to play it safe, then there is a lot you can learn from Elon Musk, even as an art collector or art industry professional.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com