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WHAT TO COLLECT # 130. Anish Kapoor

Mirroring its surroundings to reflect a rose-tinted microcosm of ambient space, UntitledANISH KAPOOR - UNTITLED, stainless steel and paint, 120 by 120 by 27.5cm., Executed in 2010 is an exquisite example of Anish Kapoor’s inimitable investigation into the possibilities of interior and exterior space. Seeming to float effortlessly in suspense above the ground, Kapoor’s dish appears to simultaneously curve outwards and inwards, distorting perception and awareness as our gaze passes across it. The luminous reflectivity of the surface radiates light, and emits a sense of meditative calm and repose. Untitledinvites contemplation: by circumnavigating the work we become an integral part of the whole, thus making every viewer’s experience of the piece subtly different.
Untitled forms part of Kapoor’s iconic corpus of mirrored sculptures, in which the possibilities of the circular format in a range of reflective materials and colors are explored. The seductive red of the present work, however, is of particular significance. Kapoor has always considered red to be a highly symbolic color, and many of his most important large-scale works – such as Marsyas, My Red Homeland (both 2003) Past, Present, Future (2006) and Svayambh (2007) – have been executed in varying shades of red. Kapoor has spoken of the importance of red in his work: “I use red a lot… It’s true that in Indian culture red is a powerful thing; it is the color a bride wears; it is associated with the matriarchal, which is central to Indian psychology. So I can see what leads me there culturally, but there’s more to it. One of the ways color has been used in art since the Eighteenth Century is to move, as in Turner, from color to light. I tend to go from color to darkness. Red has a very powerful blackness. This overt color, this open and visually beckoning color, also associates itself with a dark interior world. And that’s the real reason I’m interested in it” (Anish Kapoor in conversation with Nicholas Baume in Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Anish Kapoor: Past, Present, Future, 2008, p. 31).

Untitled also invites connections with the idea of the Sublime, in particular, the post-modern version of the concept as posited by Jean-François Lyotard. Lyotard argued that certain examples of contemporary art sought to represent ideas or themes which were impossible to truly delineate in physical form, thus arousing sensations of awe and bewilderment in the viewer as we are forced to confront concepts our mind is unable to truly comprehend. Lyotard viewed the work of Barnett Newman – with its walls of pure color undisturbed by figural or objective concerns – as being the ultimate exponent of the post-modern Sublime; yet, Kapoor’s mirrored works arguably also fulfill the conditions of post-modern Sublimity in their profound exploration of complex theory and philosophy through a totally abstract dialectic. The shimmering surfaces and the curved space of the series of wall mounted mirror installations induce a corresponding sense of disorienting arrest, not only cognitively but also physically and spatially. Indeed, the Sublime has been of abiding fascination for Kapoor throughout his career, and he has frequently spoken of the idea about his mirrored works: “It seemed it was not a mirrored object but an object full of mirroredness. The spatial questions it seemed to ask were not about deep space but about present space, which I began to think about as a new sublime. If the traditional sublime is in deep space, then this is proposing that the contemporary sublime is in front of the picture plane, not beyond it. I continue to make these works because I feel this is a whole new spatial adventure” (Anish Kapoor quoted in ibid., p. 52). As an object of immense beauty and commanding authority, Untitled is a masterful encapsulation of Kapoor’s highly assured manipulation of spatial territory.

Originally published on Sotheby’s

Copyright © Anish Kapoor http://anishkapoor.com/

Another works by Artist

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***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 128. Cristina Coral

Educated in Italy where she lives and works as a photographer.
Her approach to photography and its development was almost entirely self-taught.
She has lived her childhood in an artistic environment.
Her father was a composer, music and art have always been a very important part of her life. She has chosen the camera as my main artistic expression since 2012.

If you would like to know something more or for info about art purchases you can write to : cristinacoral@yahoo.it

Artworks by Cristina Coral are available as limited edition prints, professionally printed on museum quality archival paper.
I guarantee max. 20 or 10 copies of 1 artwork in different sizes as a limited edition.
Each artwork is signed and numbered on the reverse of the photograph and certificate.

Originally published here

Copyright © Cristina Coral

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***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 112. Lisa Kellner

Lisa Kellner has created and installed room-sized installations and two-dimensional works throughout the United States since 2006. Her work has been exhibited at the Bellevue Arts Museum (WA), the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (NY), the Brooklyn Arts Council (NY) and the Weatherspoon Museum (NC), among others.  Also, Lisa has worked with galleries including Ascent Contemporary (NY), Project 4 (DC), BravinLee Projects (NY) and JoAnne Artman (LA).  Lisa’s work has been reviewed in The New York Times, The Boston Globe and Sculpture Magazine among others.  Lisa created site-responsive installations at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum (FL), the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (ME), Lehman College Art Gallery (NY) and the Target Gallery at the Torpedo Factory (VA).  In 2016, Lisa was awarded the New Media Invitational from the Target Gallery.  She was also a Joan Mitchell semi-finalist.  Her work is currently included in the exhibition, Materiality:  The Matter of Matter at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art.

Please, find more information on https://www.lisakellner.com/

Copyright © Lisa M Kellner

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***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 110. LIONEL SMIT.

Today I went through the exhibition of Emerging and Established Artist Lionel Smit at the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami Beach.

Lionel Smit was born in Pretoria, South Africa in 1982. He creates monumental portraiture works on canvas, sculpture, silkscreen, video and public installations. Smit’s work has been exhibited locally and internationally in prestigious galleries, art fairs, and public spaces. These include a solo exhibition at the Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki and various public sculptures of his being featured in the USA including Union Square, New York City.

Smit’s painting, Kholiswa, received the Viewer’s Choice Award as part of the BP Portrait Award 2013 at the National Portrait Gallery in London. He has been a featured artist at the Miami Art Fair 2014 and on the cover of Christie’s catalog in London 2009.

Recent exhibitions include Faces of Identity, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in London and Premise, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in Cape Town.

Please, find more information about the artist on https://www.lionelsmit.co.za/about

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 109. Chris Ofili ART

Chris Ofili is renowned internationally for his richly layered works that combine imagery and influences from sources as divergent as comic books, hip-hop, Zimbabwean cave paintings, Biblical scenes, and 1970s-era Blaxploitation films.

Since moving to Trinidad in the mid-2000s, Ofili has looked increasingly to the Trinidadian landscape and mythology in order to further reflect upon his long-term consideration of history and identity.

His most recent paintings have been animated by figures and scenes from folkloric myths and arguably revisit and revise tropes of a modernist painting by artists such as Henri Matisse and Paul Gauguin. Since Ofili’s earliest paintings he has deployed a similar experimental approach to materials— incorporating diverse and unusual items including glitter, collaged magazine images, and organic matter—in order to extend his visual vocabulary.

Over the last few years, he has also experimented beyond painting through immersive installation works. At ICA Miami, Ofili’s extended-run installation will evolve over the course of its duration, with works being added and/or subtracted over time.

Ofili (b. 1968, Manchester, England) has presented solo exhibitions internationally, including at the New Museum, New York (2014); Arts Club of Chicago (2010); Tate Britain, London (2010, 2005); and the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2005), among others. He represented Britain at the Venice Biennale in 2003 and was the recipient of the Turner Prize in 1998.

On view Dec 1, 2017 – Oct 27, 2019

Chris Ofili

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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The Woman Behind the First Photography Gallery

Helen Gee risked everything to open Limelight in 1954, selling prints by Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, and Robert Frank for less than fifty dollars each. Her tell-all memoir, Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, is now available from Aperture as an e-book. Here, Denise Bethel’s introduction offers a preview of the late Gee’s story.

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee, ca. 1954–1960

Courtesy Gary Schneider

Dear Helen,

I am writing to let you know that, sixty years on, some of the questions are still the same: who succeeds as a photographer? And, whose photographs sell? When you opened your first show at Limelight, in 1954, you linked those questions together for a new generation of collectors, and they’ve been linked that way ever since. Galleries had been selling art for centuries, but you wanted your gallery to be only about photography. This was an act of courage and an act of faith. Stieglitz sold photographs, and Julien Levy too, but they both offered other art as well. Now, look at what’s happened. In 2014, when I auctioned a sale of photographs for over twenty-one million, I wished you’d been there to see it. I was wearing some of your jewelry that night, given to me by two of your closest friends. There were prints in that auction that sold for tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars, many by some of the same photographers you’d struggled to sell for twenty or thirty or forty dollars a pop—Ansel Adams, Minor White, László Moholy-Nagy, Atget, Berenice Abbott, Gene Smith, Imogen Cunningham, Robert Frank, and more. The list is long. It’s ironic that one of your closing shows, the work of Edward Weston, saw some decent sales at seventy-five dollars a print. It’s all very different now. In my life as an auctioneer, I was as ambitious for the medium as you were, and finally, after years in the low-price trenches, I sold not one, but three photographs by Edward Weston for over one million dollars each.

In those long-ago days of the 1950s, you got into selling photographs through the back door: you were a painter who got hooked on photography, and you became a photographer yourself. You made money retouching photographs, enough money even to hire a secretary. And then you wanted to open a gallery. This was a time-honored route to becoming a dealer—through love of a subject—and in retrospect, it may have been the best one. You couldn’t help yourself, it was almost that simple. This was before photographs had much status in the marketplace, and before they could promise any return on the dollar. In 1980, when I got my first job in the photo trade, we called it “photographica.” Now, it’s “fine art photography,” and it’s a medium that’s sexy, a medium that’s hot, and that element of passion is not the determining factor it once was. Maybe that’s a shame. In 1954, you opened Limelight because you loved it, and you hoped that it would somehow, someway translate into money for food and rent.

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee retouching transparencies, 1955

Courtesy Collection Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

For anyone who loves photographs the way I do, your book is a fabulous roller-coaster ride. I love all that gossip and all that juice. People known to me only through their pictures are described by you in wacky detail. Your first photography teachers were Lisette Model and Sid Grossman—Sid kept your classes going on and on past midnight, endlessly pontificating on everything from politics to photo magazines. There were Robert and Mary Frank in their chaotic loft on Twenty-Third Street, boxes everywhere, hard to tell if they were moving in or moving out. The rugged Brett Weston, driving into Manhattan with a gun on his front seat. The tipsy Gene Smith, going from tavern to tavern in the wee hours, threatening to kill himself before he hung his show. The practical Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, glad to clear her husband’s clutter from her closets. Imogen Cunningham holding court at Limelight, giving Peter Hujar one perfect piece of advice. You even babysat the young Robert De Niro, an impossible-to-control toddler with no hint of famous actor in his future. Best of all is your scene with Edward Steichen in a kimono, chasing you around his apartment, putting the moves on. Let’s face it, Helen, you were a looker. But where did you find the guts to turn down Steichen, the most important person in the photography world at the time?

Arthur Lavine, Limelight premises (91 Seventh Avenue South at Sheridan Square) before renovation, February 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

These stories make your book a page-turner, and it would be a terrific musical: young woman finds a derelict nightclub in Greenwich Village, goes up to her neck in debt, strong-arms friends to help her plaster and paint, opens a coffeehouse–gallery, and the rest is history. Think of what a director could do with this scenario, Helen, think of the songs, the backdrops, the potential dance numbers—photographers in a cancan! Rain coming in through the broken skylights! We can look back and smile at some of this, but not at the tough parts, no—no, thank you. Let’s save the tough parts for the screenplay: the lawyer who cheated you, leaving you stranded . . . the times you faced bankruptcy . . . the crash course in the restaurant business, the endless staff turnover, the bookies in your apartment building, the union organizers who helped do you in. You wanted to figure out how to sell photographs, not how to work coffee machines. But it was food that kept Limelight going when the photographs didn’t sell, and so you had no choice—you figured it all out. That abandoned nightclub before you transformed it into Limelight—good grief. What exactly were you thinking? You recount it all with equanimity and sometimes, against all odds, with humor: the highs and the lows, the triumphs and the failures. And there’s not an ounce of self-pity in the narrative. It’s a lesson for all of us.

Arthur Lavine, Jerry Tallmer and Helen Gee (during renovations for Limelight), 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

When you did sell a photograph, and it didn’t happen often enough at first, you tell us candidly that it was nothing less than “an event.” You hung sixty shows in seven years, gave a lot of photographers their first exhibition, and created a special space, unique in the city then, for photography people to gather. For better or for worse, you brought photography back into the art market debate. Your shows were reviewed, with gravitas, in the New York Times and the Village Voice. One reviewer in the Sunday Times had the nerve to suggest that, for the modern world, photographs might just be more important than paintings. Whaaaaaat?! And so the controversy started up again, years after Stieglitz had thrown in the towel, and I’m writing to tell you that it’s going on still, today. I remember an Old Masters collector who walked into a photo auction preview by mistake. He was stunned when he saw the estimates. “Why, you can buy a good painting for what some of these things are worth!” he said to me, outraged. You just have to keep smiling, right?

Arthur Lavine, The first exhibition at Limelight featured the work of Joseph Breitenbach (and was installed by Sid Grossman), May 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

If you had just been able to hang on for a few more years, Helen, just a few. If you had just been able to figure a way around the union who tried to recruit your ragtag staff of part-time actors and out-of-work dancers. You were living one week to the next as it was, on borrowed time. Who could have predicted what the last straw would be, after all the creditors you’d dodged and all the photographers you’d cajoled? It’s heart-breaking to me that you closed when you did, because photography was about to move into the art world in a big, big way. Lisette Model introduced you to the young Diane Arbus, right at the end of your run. Grace Mayer brought by a Midwesterner named John Szarkowski—he was in town for a job interview at the Museum of Modern Art. Less than a decade after Limelight folded, Lee Witkin started down the trail you’d blazed: he opened his gallery in Manhattan, in 1969, and others followed. New York and London began to auction photographs in the 1970s, and slowly the prices went up. In 1989, I was in the room when a photograph broke that magic one-hundred-thousand-dollar ceiling at auction—an Edward Weston nautilus shell. Applause broke out, and all of us thought we’d hit the big time. Yet prices kept on going. In 2006, I was at the podium for the first photograph, classic or contemporary, to sell at auction for over a million dollars, $2.93 million, in fact. It was The Pond—Moonlight, a Pictorial tour de force by your old friend Edward Steichen. And again, I was wearing some of your jewelry that night, wishing you could be in the room to see it. What would you have thought if you had seen that $2.93 million in the press, who by then was jumping on every meteoric rise in price for photographs?

Arthur Lavine, Helen Gee on the way to the opening of Limelight, May 13, 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

Does reading your book now, when so much has changed, make me miss those historic old times? It’s romantic to read about, Helen, but maybe not to have lived it. You had the strength of an ox. Now there are more of us in the business, and there is safety in those numbers. You were thrilled when Roy and Anne DeCarava opened a gallery in their apartment on the Upper West Side, because you knew it would be good for Limelight as well. It closed before you did, unfortunately. You tried new kinds of food to keep the doors open and reviewed endless portfolios for free, but it was always a cliff-hanger. In the 1950s, selling photographs was not the way to get rich, that’s for sure. You were far, far out on a limb.

Arthur Lavine, Opening party (Helen Gee and Peggy Tallmer in center), ca. 1954

Courtesy Gary Schneider

And, yes, there’s one more question your book brings up, and it’s a question, like the others, that’s still with us today: not who succeeds at selling photographs, but can it be a woman? Being a woman, Helen, might not have been the easiest way to start. When I climbed into the auctioneer’s box for the first time, I was the first female auction head of photographs to actually take a sale. (“You need to stand up in the podium, don’t sit down up there,” a friend recommended later, when he saw how the box engulfed me. “I am standing up,” I had to tell him. “I’ve been standing up for years.”) Although there are many—many—more women in the photo world today, we’re still outnumbered. And, to top it all off, in your Limelight years, you were not just a woman, you were a divorced single mom. You stayed up nights working, retouching photos, you worked when you were sick, you scrambled to find babysitters, you read all those books on raising children, you wanted your daughter to have the best. Thank you for being frank with us about trying to find the time to date and to make those tricky man-woman relationships work. How did you have any stamina left at all? For single moms out there, career moms with not much money, like you, I expect this may not have really changed.

Arthur Lavine, Exterior of Limelight, ca. 1954

Courtesy Collection Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

Helen, I’m such a fan. We don’t have enough in print about what it was like in the early days of the photo trade, and in your case, a memoir about the business has become a memoir about the medium itself. Although I adore all that gossip, my favorite parts of the book are your zingers about the lasting (or not!) value of the photographs and exhibitions of your day—your pages on The Family of Man, for starters. Your right-on comments about the whole photo scene can’t be paraphrased—and so I’ll leave it to new readers to discover for themselves your razor-sharp eye. You would have been a great critic, Helen, because you knew the medium from the inside, and you made it your business to know the people. I am in awe of what you did, and for taking the time and trouble to put it down on paper.

With all best wishes,

Denise Bethel, New York, January 2018

Denise Bethel, formerly Chairman, Photographs, Americas, Sotheby’s New York, is now an independent advisor, a writer, and a lecturer based in New York City.

Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, published by Aperture as an e-book, is available on Amazon and other e-book retailers.

Read the original article: https://aperture.org/blog/limelight-helen-gee/

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Galleries you need to explore during an Art Basel Hong Kong

TANG CONTEMPORARY ART

10/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road

Central, Hong Kong

https://www.tangcontemporary.com/

PARA SITE ART SPACE Set up in 1996 and for many years the city’s only name in contemporary art, Para Site is still a proud voice in Hong Kong’s independent art scene.

• 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building, 677 King’s Road, Quarry Bay

http://www.para-site.org.hk/

GALLERY EXIT

Opened in 2008 to provide an exhibition space for emerging Hong Kong artists, with an emphasis on edgy, conceptual art.

• 3/F, 25 Hing Wo Street, Tin Wan, Hong Kong

http://www.galleryexit.com/

M+ PAVILION

The first completed portion of the West Kowloon Cultural district, the M+ Pavilion currently serves as an exhibition space until the completion of the M+ museum proper in 2019.

• West Kowloon Cultural District.

https://www.westkowloon.hk/en/mpluspavilion/

GALLERIST PEARL LAM

has been in the business for 20 years, making her a key figure in the rise of the Chinese contemporary art market.

• Pearl Lam Galleries Hong Kong Pedder

601-605 Pedder Building,

12 Pedder Street,

Central Hong Kong

https://www.pearllam.com/

ABOVE SECOND

Above Second is a small space punching well above its weight, as the only gallery in Hong Kong to specialise in urban and street art.

9 First St

Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong

http://www.abovesecondgallery.com/

ART AND DINE

BIBO

Half fine French fare, half art gallery: Bibo’s walls are bedecked with work by Banksy, Damien Hirst, Basquiat and Takashi Murakami – and the dishes look almost as good.

• G/F, 163 Hollywood Road, Sheung Way

DUDDELL’S

The Michelin-starred dim sum is great , but so too is the artwork. Duddell’s runs a rotating series of exhibitions of some of Hong Kong’s and Asia’s finest contemporary art.

• 3/F, Shanghai Tang Mansion, 1 Duddell Street, Central Hong Hong

THE POPSY ROOM

A gallery by day, by night The Popsy Room transforms its space into a private kitchen that takes a multi-sensory approach to food.

• 30 Upper Lascar Row, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

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INSPIRATION #150. PHOTOGRAPHY

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ABOUT DIVERSITY IN ART INDUSTRY

“The more diversity you have, the faster you are able to get the right answer…” – Kerry McCarthy.

When I read interviews with people like Thelma Golden, I am not afraid to achieve new goals.

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As someone from the far country, I am responsive to the diversity in my industry. For all the time I am looking for ways to work in a foreign land with native and multicultural people. I became more loyal, more tolerant and more open-minded for last five years for the laborious time I moved and studied a new language.a01b17eae23e2a16f8d8186fc1b9a87b
Thelma’s bio shows that we can learn not only from schools but mutual experience and nonverbal connections with objects. I agreed with her.
With a time I noticed that a comprehensive search strategy based on the specific needs of museums would increase the quality of the museum services, bring a different cultural look to the exhibitions and create an art field that people want to see in the modern art institutions. I am sure; there are a lot of multilingual and multiracial professionals who look farther the market and able to contribute the culture.

According to a Thelma Golden interview, that a critical part of curatorial duties to be as an active co-conspirator with artists, reflected in me. The same cultural language will make it more comfortable and awake new opportunities for all sides of the conversation to what the art future may bring.

“We are equal in how we should be treated. Every race and gender is equal in this sense, but we are all different – and, that is a beautiful thing.” -James Michael Sama

Inspiring day to all!

Masha

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 107. Gianluca Traina

Gianluca Traina was born in 1984 in Palermo, where he currently lives and works. He attended the art school of his hometown, where he graduated in 2002. In the same year, he moved to Florence to study Fashion Design at Polimoda. In2004 he won a scholarship of the Camera Nazionale Della Moda Italiana in Milano attends a specialization course in Fashion Home Design. This course enabled him to acquire the necessary knowledge that will open the doors of the fashion Empire. His work until 2008 for the most important companies in the industry, boasting important partnerships and experiences.

The failure of his expectations in the fashion industry and the lack of real opportunities for professional development led him in 2009 to return to his hometown and attend a course in painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Palermo.

Since 2009 in parallel with the study begins to develop interests and projects, that would soon lead him to live an extraordinary popularity and rapid and intended career in the art world. His research is focused in painting and sculpture, overlapping unusual and contemporary materials such as PVC and paper, through which develops forms, signs, and places taken from a personal memory and the suggestions from different cultures and historical periods typical of his Mediterranean identity.

COPYRIGHT BY Gianluca Traina https://gianlucatraina.com

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BEST WAY TO APPROACH A GALLERY

For me, one of the most intriguing moments for the contemporary art, that this is a human way of speaking about our transformations. From the personal prospectives to the outside world we are studying identities in action through the different art technics.
I see art as a dominant element which contains a range of conceptual meanings and theoretical roles associated with it.LAY OUT 1 idea masha

If you think that your work has a strong manifestation and deserves the personal attention of the gallery, you shouldn’t wait with submission.

Check out galleries that you think may like your work. Start to explore art spaces near you.
Get to know the artists they are showing already. Check the art fairs the gallery featured. At the beginning of your ambitious career, you need to explore the galleries background before sending the application.

Once you’ve determined which gallery or galleries you are interested in, you should carefully prepare your presentation. Better, have all of these at your fingertips already, but if not, now is the time to start. I recommend using professional templates to make the statement or hire a professional consulting. It is a first, and probably, could be the last insight about your work for the art institution.
You have to explain, your passion for working with particular gallery or curator to present a unique piece. Be able to analyze if necessary that there are no analogs on the art market.

If a gallery has a submissions policy, be sure to abide by that. If not, they’ll toss your work in the trash. Don’t hesitate to contact a gallery and get their guidelines.

When you submit your work via email or postal mail, be sure that your letter is professional. Always put the name of the person you need to contact. Google it, ask someone, or contact the gallery itself- just find out!

Put together your bio, statement, portfolio, and any other relevant information they could check about you on social media. Be aware, the galleries and art show may ask different details of your background.

Also, if you send your information via email, be sure to use small image files. If you load down their inbox, they won’t be happy, or they may not even receive your information at all. It could bounce or end up in a spam filter. So keep it small- 4MB total is best.
Perhaps the last advice would be to prepare your masterpiece for the showing. I will not recommend sending a submission of the same work to the few galleries. The limits are one of the keys to the success.

Wishing you good luck!

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 105. SKY KIM

SKY KIM

Born in Seoul, Korea, she received her M.F.A at Pratt Institute, has exhibited all over the US and internationally, and has collected a National Museum of Contemporary Art’s North Korean Art Competition Award and a Pratt Institute Art Grant. Her work has been exhibited at the Toronto Art Fair, GLAAD Art Auction, DUMBO Arts Festival, the Gwangju Biennale and has been reviewed in multiple publications including The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Washington Post and the Arts Observer.SkyKim_2

Kim has described her work as “meticulous, labor-intensive watercolor paintings/drawings (that) is at once abstract, anatomical, spiritual and sensual.” Influenced by her spiritual belief in reincarnation, there is a meditative, “wheel of life” aspect to her creative process. According to an interview with The Hawk, Kim is quoted as saying, “After I understood reincarnation, my art changed. I started using repetition, a lot of circles, wiggly lines; a lot of layers overlapping. That’s how I see life.” It seems that Kim’s efforts have not gone unnoticed. In a review published on the website Arte Fuse, author Daniel Gauss observes, “the ever-repeating patterns are a type of surrogate for the eternal. They become a type of idealized concept we can superimpose on a universe of decay and decomposition.”

You are welcome to check out the artist website
Watch “Sky Kim / Artist @ NARS Foundation Studio” on Vimeo 

Copyright @ Sky Kim

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***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 103. PAOLO ICARO

Paolo Icaro Chissotti was born in Turin in 1936.

In 1958 he began to practice sculpture in the studio of Umberto Mastroianni. In 1960 he moved to Rome, where in 1962 he held his first one-man show at the Galleria Schneider. In 1964 he took part in the III Ceramic Art Biennale of Gubbio, obtaining the Ministry for Foreign Trade award. In 1965 he was invited to the IX Quadriennale of Rome. In 1966 he moved to New York, where he lived until 1968. In America, he created the Forme di Spazio (Forms of space, 1967), immediately afterward renamed Gabbie (Cages), metal structures where instead of occupying the space the sculpture becomes the place, the origin of that space.

Some of the most significant one-man shows of the last few years are: Modalità, Lorenzelli Arte, Milano (2006-2007); Faredisfarerifarevedere, curated by Mario Bertoni, Centro d’Arte e Cultura Chiesa di San Paolo, Modena (2008); Le pietre di marmo, a homage exhibition within the XXVth Sculpture Biennale of Gubbio, curated by Giorgio Bonomi (2008); Biografia ideale, curated by Ludovico Pratesi, Centro Arti Visive Pescheria, Pesaro (2009); 15 Stele 15, curated by Lara Conte, Parma, Galleria Niccoli (2010). He has also taken part in numerous collective exhibitions, including Time & Place: Milano – Torino. 1958-1968, curated by Luca Massimo Barbero (2008; itinerant) and Italics. Arte italiana fra tradizione e rivoluzione 1968-2008, curated by Francesco Bonami (2008-2009). In 2010 he was presented by Massimo Minini in the section Back to the future of Artissima. In 2011 he showed Cardo e Decumano (2010) at Bologna, in the place of Palazzo d’Accursio, in occasion of Art First. The following personal shows were organized in these last years: Modalità, Lorenzelli Arte, Milan (2006-2007); Faredisfarerifarevedere, by Mario Bertoni, Centro d’Arte and Cultura Chiesa di San Paolo, Modena (2008); Le pietre di marmo, show in hommage to the XXV Biennale di Scultura di Gubbio, by Giorgio Bonomi (2008); Biografia ideale, by Ludovico Pratesi, Centro Arti Visive Pescheria, Pesaro (2009); 15 Stele 15, by Lara Conte, Galleria Niccoli, Parma (2010); Su misura, by Lara Conte and Mauro Panzera, Galleria Il Ponte, Florence (2011); I do as I did, Lorenzelli Arte, Milan (2011). He lives and works in Tavullia, Pesaro.

Paolo Icaro “Pile Up, 22” – Studio la Città, Verona 2013

Paolo Icaro conversazione con Marco Meneguzzo – Studio La Città, Verona 2013

Original: “Eccedenza 90°” by Paolo Icaro on Artsy https://www.artsy.net/artwork/paolo-icaro-eccedenza-90-degrees
http://www.lorenzelliarte.com/en/exhibitions/paolo-icaro-09-11
***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email
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TO PARENTS

I have a daughter, she is five, and of course, she enrolled in the art school since three years old. What I love to do, is collecting a kids books illustrated by famous Artist and read them with my adorable. So, I got another dozen books on my shelf and also cheered to Filipa’s school, they were pleased to get it. There a lot of interesting stories and colors. Below I added few links, but there are much more to find online.

The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Andersen & Yayoi Kusama: A Fairy Tale of Infinity and Love Forever

Yayoi Kusama: From Here to Infinity!

Frida Kahlo and Her Animalitos

Frida Kahlo: The Artist who Painted Herself (Smart About Art)

Keith Haring: The Boy Who Just Kept Drawing

The Keith Haring Coloring Book

David Hockney: Six Fairy Tales from Brothers Grimm

Action Jackson

The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: With Artwork by Yayoi Kusama

The Autobiography of a Snake: Drawings by Andy Warhol

Henri’s Scissors

My Museum

#art #kids #fineart #reading #school #schooldaily #family #artclasses #carring #artcollecting #artassistance #artsignificator #gallery #museum #design #contemporary

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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DON’T JUDGE THE ART

Another Art show is over.

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INSTALLATION BY ARTIST: UGO RONDINONE, NY

Five full days of art in San – Francisco, and what did I get from them?

Over 250 galleries from around the world were represented, showing an overwhelming array of art from the most talented, most imaginative contemporary artists in the world.

I love to learn from art; I like to learn from other artists. A good show for me means to have a conversation with my mind and to cast about answers for the masterpiece. I encourage myself to find a language to work and to encode the exact subject.

I don’t judge the art. This is an act of my knowledge and standards in art. The location where the piece was delivered to live, the artist’s interpretation of the concept, is all the act of imagination and self-satisfaction. What are the moral reasons to judge someone’s passion? How are we to evaluate someone’s creativity and their expression of it through art?

In the world of art we just explorers. The artists give us their permission to be engaged with their independent opinion, and in doing us, allow us to see their sensitive mind.

To attend the art exhibition, for many artists, means to feel insecure. In this highly competitive industry, they want to celebrate with us at a non-routine event. The worst part of this is that low-intelligence reviews will kill the artists’ future abilities to create.

The invitation to the art world has to be an art treatment for us. Therefore, it always satisfies the mind; the enjoyment has to be beyond everything.

Do not postpone your compliments to art. Find an artistic language with which to articulate. Open your mind to creative insights. Bring your favorite piece to work and make it your self-therapy. Do not judge the artists. Instead, find your style in art, and through connections with colors or materials, your soul will be aligned. The right words exist.

Good luck with your art observations,

Masha Melnik

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com