WHAT TO COLLECT # 143. Khairullah Rahim

I would like to share with you today, an artwork by emerging Artist Khairullah Rahim. I stopped by the booth at Untitled art fair Miami this year because of captured his wall sculptures. I have been attracted by the pastel color pallet and nonstandard urban materials he used. I love urbanism in art because it helps us to think about our place in the world and look individually at the space where people live and work. I feel that with this type of art we can try to change modern space, make it brighter, creative and more comfortable. KR_Best-Supporting-Actor-2018-115-x-65cm
Khairullah Rahim practice explores stories that are concerned with experiences of oppression and prejudice against communities whose identities do not fit. In response, strategies for surviving and flourishing have emerged as recurring points of discussion and consideration throughout his works. While Rahim’s works may evoke a distinctive joyful demeanor, they loaded with stories of loss and marginalization. Artist blends unconventional, readymade materials to express his creative ideas in art production.
Objects and materials in his sculptures having metaphoric meanings that go deeper than the surface appearance of its particular original landscape. The artworks highlight colorism of specific female duties and shows, that visual perception just a passive observation and has nothing common with the particular cleaning process.
Artist also has a very collection of paintings and been showcased in numerous exhibitions and art fairs abroad, such as in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, Turkey, and the USA.
You can find more of Khairullah Rahim’s works on his Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/khairullahrahim/?hl=en

assemblage-flamingo-2_originstallation-view-1_1_origWe Met, and yes, we had a sex

Images source

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

3 Recommendations to Emerging Artists

Through my routine work days, I see a lot of frustration around. Every day I am receiving messages from artists with only one request: please, help me sell my art.

I could outline some practical steps for people to succeed in selling, but let’s be realistic: there is no right answer, one person’s strategy can be useless for another. Let’s focus on three general recommendation that should and will work today for emerging artists.

First of all, I am going to recommend all artists to become more independent and to find a job to earn a living, maybe outside of the art world. Dear Millennials, you need to stop waiting and dreaming, everything is much more challenging than you expect. Look to the real economy, do research: how many galleries closed in your town for the last two years? How many Art Institutes are closed around the world? You will see that we are experiencing a downturn in the middle- and a lower-priced art market. It is better to understand that real collectors are not investors, they buy art for personal satisfaction and enjoyment. Collectors have appreciated your talent, but they will not donate to your talent at list, there are no other conditions.

Second, be more precise in the way you’re expressing your ideas in art. Your masterpieces need to be academically creative and clearly, reflect your idea if you want it to be marketable today. Now is not the best time for “multi-meaning”, non-sellable or non-affordable emerging art. Art is not just about the talent of the artist. It is a whole science, including sales skills, self-representation and a deep understanding of psychology. Make sure your subject is sharp.

Finally, my third recommendation, start to learn how to support your art by yourself. Develop your Instagram, use it to display your environment and background to your benefit. Be intelligent and more transparent on social media: art curators and collectors are checking your backgrounds each day. Continue to pursue your passions, revolutionize the process of making art, explore science and technologies, learn the basics of art marketing.

Dear artists, the art industry has run into some changes, and it is not your fault. The economy wheel is spinning around, and soon we will see a new cycle and a more supportive art market. I am sure that professionals in the art industry will find the best solutions for you, and we all continue working in the new settings.

My best wishes,

Masha

What to collect #142. GISELA COLON

GISELA COLON (Canada, b. 1966) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Colon is an American contemporary artist who has developed a unique vocabulary of “organic minimalism,” breathing life-like qualities into reductive forms. Colon’s oeuvre encompasses several distinct sculptural forms: Pods, Slabs, Monoliths, and Portals. The through-line in all of Colon’s work is the concept of the “mutable object;” the sculptures are conceived as variable objects that transmute their physical qualities through fluctuating movement, varied lighting, changing environmental conditions, and the passage of time.

The Pods are created through a proprietary fabrication method of blow-molding and layering various acrylic materials, producing transformational objects that emanate light and color from within. 

Biography and images via https://www.giselacolon.com/

Copyright © GISELA COLON

* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request by email@artcuratoronline.com

5 Things You Must Know Before You Invest in Art

5 Things You Must Know Before You Invest in Art

Investing in art may seem en vogue or even financially advantageous. But what do art investing novices need to know before diving into this market?
Investing in art may seem en vogue or even financially advantageous. But what do art investing novices need to know before diving into this market?
By – DECEMBER 13, 2018

From “Nu couché (sur le côté gauche)” to “Salvator Mundi”, expensive works of art have been in the news for fetching sale prices of hundreds of millions of dollars. This may intrigue wealthy individuals and lead them to consider adding artwork to their own portfolio of assets. Some may even consider art to be an exciting investment vehicle. In fact, a survey by Deloitte suggests that 76% of art collectors consider their collections as investments, up from 53% in 2012. However, there are several essential considerations for amateur art investors to consider before making their first acquisition.

Value of Global Art Market (billions)

Being an Art Investor Takes Expertise

The first hurdle for investors seeking to get involved with investing in artwork is to develop an understanding of artistic theories and valuation techniques. Unlike investing in public companies or real estate, artwork does not lend itself to traditional investing valuation methods.

Therefore, prudent investors will need to put in a significant amount of effort to learn about artistic methods, art history, specific markets and pricing trends before getting into the action themselves. Fortunately for those that have some type of analytical experience, there are a few helpful data sources available. For example, investors can use the Blouin Art Sales Index to analyse trends in the art market. The platform has an extensive database which allows investors to analyse various artists’ sales records, estimate price bands and locate auctions. Additionally, for those that have a particularly keen interest in learning more about these topics, there are many online and in-person courses offered by Universities and organisations such as Sotheby’s Institute of Art that provide training to understand the fundamentals of art theory, collecting and investing.

Be Aware of the Hidden Costs

In addition the high sticker prices of artwork, investors must be aware of the costs associated with buying and selling these assets. First, in order to ensure that your purchase is valuable, it is crucial to determine that you are purchasing an original work. Therefore, you may want to hire an art inspector if you are relatively new to art investing or purchasing a very expensive piece. Once you have purchased a piece of artwork, you will also have to consider the costs of storing, cleaning and maintaining the piece. This varies greatly based on the age and type artwork (e.g. painting, sculpture, etc.).

Next, unlike stocks or bonds, paintings, sculptures and other types of art are more difficult to sell. In fact, some experts estimate that a mere 0.5% of paintings purchased are ever resold. For this reason, and to ensure that they receive the highest possible price, many individuals elect to sell their pieces through galleries or art dealers. The fee structure of these agents varies, but is typically charged based on a rather high percentage of the sale price. Those confident in their own ability to sell their artwork may be able to dodge fees by selling through online auctions.

Cost of Selling Art

You Don’t Need to Travel to London or New York to Buy Art

While about 60% of global art sales take place in the United States and United Kingdom, art markets elsewhere are growing. For instance, in 2008 China accounted for just 9% of global art sales, but now represents about 20%. Furthermore, major auction houses such as Christie’s, Sotheby’s and Bonhams have locations in Singapore. Additionally, the online art market has grown rapidly, with total online sales up 76% since 2013. These factors indicate that investing in art is increasingly accessible for Singaporeans, who no longer have to travel far to participate in art auctions.

Global Online Art & Antiques Sales by Year

Art Versus Other Investments

While a study Stanford found that artwork investments averaged annual returns of about 6.5% from 1972 to 2010, individuals may find even better returns from more traditional investments such as mutual funds or index funds. For example, the S&P 500 has historically averaged annual returns of about 7% to 10%. For this reason, individuals that view their artwork as simply an investment vehicle may be better off choosing to invest in property or securities. In order to ensure that you maximise your returns, be sure to compare fee structures across brokerage platforms as these fees can eat into your total return. On the other hand, if you enjoy physical ownership of artworks you may be willing to accept the potential of smaller returns from an art investment in comparison to stocks or property. Additionally, some analysts believe that art can be a safer investment as it is less tied to financial markets than stocks or properties. However, it is important to keep in mind that the art market is subject to its own volatility as tastes in artwork can also change over time.

S&P 500 Index

You Don’t Have to Buy a Famous Painting to Invest in Art

If reading more about the reality of art investing has discouraged you from purchasing artwork yourself, there is good news. Through investment funds, it is possible to invest in funds managed by professional art investment managers who have trained expertise in the field. For their services, these funds tend to charge fees of 1% to 5%. While these fees can be more expensive that other types of investment funds, art funds provide access to an exciting area of investing for individuals that are unable to dedicate large amounts of funds to purchasing individual pieces of art. Additionally, seasoned art investors tend to seek out up-and-coming artists in order to purchase potentially valuable art before it garners a reputation and high price tag. You can try finding some of these new artists through websites such as Artsy or Instagram. Furthermore, with enough expertise, you might be able to spot valuable but unrecognised pieces of artwork at the oddest places while travelling.

Originally published on https://www.valuechampion.sg/5-things-you-must-know-you-invest-art-0

William Hofmann

William is a Senior Research Analyst at ValueChampion Singapore, focusing on banking and SMEs. He previously was an Economic Consultant at Industrial Economics Inc

Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Link to share: Myths that stop people from buying art https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Why Love Generative Art? Article by Jason Bailey

Over the last 50 years, our world has turned digital at breakneck speed. No art form has captured this transitional time period – our time period – better than generative art. Generative art takes full advantage of everything that computing has to offer, producing elegant and compelling artworks that extend the same principles and goals artists have pursued from the inception of modern art.

Geometry, abstraction, and chance are important themes not just for generative art, but for all art of 20th Century. As an art historian and an amateur generative artist, I see a clear line of influence on generative art starting from Cézanne and shooting straight through to the:

  • Fracturing of geometry in Analytical Cubism

  • Emphasis on technology, machine aesthetic, and mechanized production from Futurism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus

  • Introduction of autonomy and chance in Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism

  • Anti-figurative aesthetic, bold geometry, and intense color of Neoplasticism, Suprematism, Hard-edged Abstraction, and OpArt

  • Use of algorithms by Sol Lewitt and others

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_501″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 510.78125px”>  Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth  - Hilma af Klint, 1907

Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_523″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 475px”>  Suprematist Composition -  Kasimir Malevich, 1916

Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_541″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 392.953125px”>  Circles in a Circle  - Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_560″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 400px”>  Highway and Byways  - Paul Klee, 1928

Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_578″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 380px”>  Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)  - Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_597″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 410.203125px”>  Concentric Squares  - Josef Albers, 1941

Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941