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WHAT TO COLLECT # 132. Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura is a visual artist based in Austin with a diverse multi-media practice. She received her BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from UT Austin. Teruko has exhibited in the U.S. and Mexico, and has completed three temporary public art installations in the last year.  She is currently a member of ICOSA art collective, a participant in the City of Austin’s Launchpad program for public art, and one of three Austin artists featured in the 2017 TX Biennial.

More information on https://www.terukonimura.net/

https://pin.it/yxkjxalfuul4ck

Copyright @ Teruco Nimura

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WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

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Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence?

Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence? Christie’s Will Test the Waters This Fall

The auction house is selling an AI-produced work of art for the first time this fall.

• Naomi Rea 3 days ago

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

Christie’s New York will make history this fall when it becomes the first auction house to sell a work of art made by artificial intelligence. The print on canvas, a product of an algorithm developed by the French art collective Obvious, will be included in the auction house’s prints and multiples sale October 23-25.

Hugo Caselles-Dupré, a member of the Paris-based collective, told artnet News that they were “interested in the philosophical approach behind this,” he said. “Can an algorithm be creative? If so, this algorithm is the closest to the human mind’s creativity.”

The work was created using a model called a Generative Adversarial Network. The artists first fed a generator a dataset of 15,000 portraits done between the 14th and 20th centuries. It then created new works based on the training set until it was able to fool a test designed to distinguish whether an image was made by human or machine.

The resulting work, titled Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, depicts a man in a dark coat and white collar with indecipherable facial features that reside somewhere in the uncanny valley. The unique piece, a gold-framed canvas print that is currently on view in Christie’s London showroom, is estimated at $7,000-10,000. The collective says it will use the proceeds from the sale to further train its algorithm, finance the computational power needed to make such works, and experiment with 3D modeling.

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

The Christie’s sale constitutes an important validation in the realm of AI art. Although there are many so-called “creative coders” who use similar technologies to improve web experience, few are considered contemporary artists. The members of Obvious see themselves as conceptual artists whose main goal is to democratize Generative Adversarial Networks and legitimize AI-produced art.

“We wanted to propose this new approach to a more traditional market rather than the tech area,” Caselles-Dupré said. “At the beginning it was difficult to be understood by the traditional art market because they were looking at us like, ‘Who are those guys? What is this new weird stuff?’ But the more we’ve explained what we’re doing, what we want to share, and what we want to say, the more the art world is paying attention to our work.”

Following the Christie’s sale, Obvious plans to work with brands and galleries to expand the movement. “We really believe that AI can be a new tool for art,” Caselles-Dupré said. “In 1850, when the camera showed up, it was only used by highly qualified engineers and so it was not considered for its artistic potential. We think we are in the same situation, because people view us as engineers but we really think this type of technology will be used more and more in art.”

Installation view of Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy (2018).

The collective began a conversation with Christie’s following a London symposium on the implications of blockchain for the art world. “Christie’s continually stays attuned to changes in the art market and how technology can impact the creation and consumption of art,” said the auction house’s head of prints and multiples, Richard Lloyd, in a statement. “AI has already been incorporated as a tool by contemporary artists and as this technology further develops, we are excited to participate in these continued conversations.”

Edmond de Belamy is one of 11 portraits of the fictional Belamy family, which is named after Ian Goodfellow, the AI researcher who invented the Generative Adversarial Network method in 2014. (“Goodfellow” roughly translates to the French bel ami.) Another portrait from the family, Le Comte de Belamy, sold to Parisian collector Nicolas Laugero-Lassere earlier this year.

Originally published on the artnet News

https://news-artnet-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/news.artnet.com/market/artificial-intelligence-christies-1335170/amp-page

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 127. KAWS

Born in 1974 in Jersey City, NJ, USA

Lives and works in New York, USA

Considered one of the most relevant artists of his generation, KAWS engages audiences beyond the museums and galleries in which he regularly exhibits. His prolific body of influential work straddles the worlds of art and design to include paintings, murals, large-scale sculptures, street art, and graphic and product design. Over the last two decades KAWS has built a successful career with work that consistently shows his formal agility as an artist, as well as his underlying wit, irreverence, and affection for our times. He often draws inspiration and appropriates from pop culture animations to form a unique artistic vocabulary for his works across various mediums.

Now admired for his larger-than-life sculptures and hardedge paintings that emphasize line and color, KAWS’ cast of hybrid cartoon and human characters are perhaps the strongest examples of his exploration of humanity. His refined graphic language revitalizes figuration with big, bold gestures and keen, playful intricacy. As seen in his collaborations with global brands, KAWS’ imagery possesses a sophisticated humor and reveals a thoughtful interplay with consumer products. Highly sought-after by collectors inside and outside of the art world, KAWS’ artworks, with their broad appeal, establishes him as one of the most prominent artists in today’s culture.

KAWS (b. 1974, Jersey City, New Jersey; lives and works in Brooklyn, New York) has exhibited internationally in major museums. His recent solo exhibitions include KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2016) which traveled to the Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); KAWS, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Longside Gallery, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (2016). His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2017); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga, Spain (2014); Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas (2013); Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia (2013); and the High Art Museum, Atlanta, Georgia (2011).

His monumental sculptures have been shown in prestigious locations including the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, United Kingdom and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

KAWS Is Bringing a Giant Floating Figure to Seoul’s Seokchon… https://hypebeast.com/2018/6/kaws-holiday-seokchon-lake-seoul-korea

COPYRIGHT @ by KAWS

Originally published on https://www.perrotin.com/artists/Kaws/55/view-of-the-exhibition-where-the-end-starts-curated-by-andrea-karnes-at-modern-art-museum-of-fort-worth-fort-worth-usa-2016/10000012698

#art #installation #kaws #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog #ArtForYou

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 125. SOFIA BONATI

Sofia Bonati

What I enjoy most is playing with textures and color combinations.

Sofia Bonati is an Argentinian artist currently living in Surrey, United Kingdom. She was born in Buenos Aires in 1982 into a family of artists, and started her artistic career when she moved to the UK in 2013. In addition to her studio practice, she has also developed a career as an illustrator, with clients such as Iberia (Spain), Vanity Fair (France) and Mondadori (Italy). Working mostly in pencil and wet media on paper, Bonati imbues her female gures and portraits with surrealistic elements, seemingly granting them the powers of the animals, plants, and objects that adorn them. Smooth, focused pencil drawing of realistic portraiture grounds each subject in the midst of flowing, dream-like surroundings, creating stunningly beautiful, imagined tableaus.

Copyright @ SOFIA BONATI

https://www.behance.net/Soffronia

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WHAT TO COLLECT #123. ALEX GARANT

Internationally renown as the Queen of Double Eyes, Alex Garant studied visual arts at Notre-Dame–De-Foy College just outside Quebec City. After graduating in 2001, she ultimately settled in Toronto, Canada.

She decided to indeed commit to her passion for Arts after suffering from a heart attack in 2012, changing forever how she would see the world.

As a pioneer of Contemporary Figurative Op Art, her oil paintings offer a graphic quality combined with traditional portrait techniques. Garant establishes herself as one of the leaders of analog Glitch Art by using patterns, duplication of elements,  symmetry and image superposition as crucial elements of her imagery.  Alex Garant’s paintings are indeed conversation pieces as they are meant to engage the observers in an image investigation process and hopefully enlist their senses differently while doing so.

Alex has shown works in Art Galleries all over Canada and the U.S., Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York as well as Australia and Portugal. Her works have also been shown at The Fullerton Museum and The Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH) in California. She has been featured on CB;  her works have been seen in Magazines including hi-fructose, Juxtapoz, BAZAAR, Le Petit Voyeur, Tattoo Fest Magazine, The Art Education Journal, Beautiful Bizarre Magazine and on multiple online platforms including VICE, The Huffington Post, Buzznet, ViralNova, Tory Burch Trends and many more.

Copyright @ Alex Garant

Find out more about the Artist on https://www.alexgarant.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT #122. JOAN JONAS

Born in 1936 in New York, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video art, and a titan of the American avant-garde.

She is known for blending performance and film in exciting and challenging ways. She rose to artistic fame in the late 1960s for her compelling Mirror Pieces, which featured performers carrying mirrors on stage and slowly, deliberately rotating them, transforming the audience into an image on glass.

Please, watch YouTube movie:

https://youtu.be/rzp6Ehnxq34

#art #installation #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog

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INSPIRATION #160. ART IN DESIGN

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 121. ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol

American, 1928–1987

Inspired by the portraits that Man Ray photographed of Marcel Duchamp’s alter ego, Rrose Sélavy, Andy Warhol created a series of drag self-portraits. Always questioning the conventions of constructed identity, Warhol donned a wig and bold makeup, subverting traditional gender expectations and paying homage to the artists before him.

Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981

Gelatin silver print

Image: 3.5 x 2.25 in. (8.89 x 5.72 cm.)

Sheet: 4.25 x 3.4 in. (10.8 x 8.64 cm.)

American Pop Art icon Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was known for taking photographic portraits of his many friends in and outside of the art world. The photographic medium was critical to Warhol’s artistic production, and he brought his camera with him wherever he went. His photographic oeuvre reads like today’s ubiquitous social media photo streams and provides a fascinating look into the life of an enigmatic figure whose influence on the art world, and society as a whole, is unparalleled. Playing with the notions of identity, perception, and one’s public versus private self, Warhol also took many poignant self-portraits, often in drag, as seen here.

Originally it was published on

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/andy-warhol/self-portrait-in-drag-8

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 120. LIZA RAYN

LIza RAYN

born in 1965 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Ryan earned a BFA at Dartmouth College, (New Hampshire) in 1987 and an MFA from California State University, Fullerton in 1994. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Liza works in photography, video and mixed media. Her interest in the use of visual metaphor remains constant throughout her bodies of work.The J. Paul Getty Museum, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, California) are among the public collections holding works by Ryan.

Copyright @ Liza Ryan

http://www.lizaryan.com

#lizarayn #auction #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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WHAT TO COLLECT #114 . GUDA KOSTER

Guda Koster is a Dutch artist who creates living sculptures and performances, which the photographs are the results of. Koster’s works are created in parallels of time, space, and textile. In her works, Koster uses fabrics, colors, and patterns that underline the codes and meanings our clothing conveys

How would you describe your works? I make installations, sculptures, and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives, we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.

Please, read more about Artist Guda Koster here Videos on YOUTUBE

Copyright by Guda Koster

Indian summer

photo, work

2017, fotoprint, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

Stormy weather

photo, work

2017, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

One leg

photo, work

2017, photoprint

Size: divers

Happy?

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Just married

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Box

sculpture, work

2015, sculpture, karton, textiel, schoenen, paspop, 100 x 150 x 80 cm

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