WHAT TO COLLECT # 143. Khairullah Rahim

I would like to share with you today, an artwork by emerging Artist Khairullah Rahim. I stopped by the booth at Untitled art fair Miami this year because of captured his wall sculptures. I have been attracted by the pastel color pallet and nonstandard urban materials he used. I love urbanism in art because it helps us to think about our place in the world and look individually at the space where people live and work. I feel that with this type of art we can try to change modern space, make it brighter, creative and more comfortable. KR_Best-Supporting-Actor-2018-115-x-65cm
Khairullah Rahim practice explores stories that are concerned with experiences of oppression and prejudice against communities whose identities do not fit. In response, strategies for surviving and flourishing have emerged as recurring points of discussion and consideration throughout his works. While Rahim’s works may evoke a distinctive joyful demeanor, they loaded with stories of loss and marginalization. Artist blends unconventional, readymade materials to express his creative ideas in art production.
Objects and materials in his sculptures having metaphoric meanings that go deeper than the surface appearance of its particular original landscape. The artworks highlight colorism of specific female duties and shows, that visual perception just a passive observation and has nothing common with the particular cleaning process.
Artist also has a very collection of paintings and been showcased in numerous exhibitions and art fairs abroad, such as in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, Turkey, and the USA.
You can find more of Khairullah Rahim’s works on his Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/khairullahrahim/?hl=en

assemblage-flamingo-2_originstallation-view-1_1_origWe Met, and yes, we had a sex

Images source

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

3 Recommendations to Emerging Artists

Through my routine work days, I see a lot of frustration around. Every day I am receiving messages from artists with only one request: please, help me sell my art.

I could outline some practical steps for people to succeed in selling, but let’s be realistic: there is no right answer, one person’s strategy can be useless for another. Let’s focus on three general recommendation that should and will work today for emerging artists.

First of all, I am going to recommend all artists to become more independent and to find a job to earn a living, maybe outside of the art world. Dear Millennials, you need to stop waiting and dreaming, everything is much more challenging than you expect. Look to the real economy, do research: how many galleries closed in your town for the last two years? How many Art Institutes are closed around the world? You will see that we are experiencing a downturn in the middle- and a lower-priced art market. It is better to understand that real collectors are not investors, they buy art for personal satisfaction and enjoyment. Collectors have appreciated your talent, but they will not donate to your talent at list, there are no other conditions.

Second, be more precise in the way you’re expressing your ideas in art. Your masterpieces need to be academically creative and clearly, reflect your idea if you want it to be marketable today. Now is not the best time for “multi-meaning”, non-sellable or non-affordable emerging art. Art is not just about the talent of the artist. It is a whole science, including sales skills, self-representation and a deep understanding of psychology. Make sure your subject is sharp.

Finally, my third recommendation, start to learn how to support your art by yourself. Develop your Instagram, use it to display your environment and background to your benefit. Be intelligent and more transparent on social media: art curators and collectors are checking your backgrounds each day. Continue to pursue your passions, revolutionize the process of making art, explore science and technologies, learn the basics of art marketing.

Dear artists, the art industry has run into some changes, and it is not your fault. The economy wheel is spinning around, and soon we will see a new cycle and a more supportive art market. I am sure that professionals in the art industry will find the best solutions for you, and we all continue working in the new settings.

My best wishes,

Masha

What to collect #142. GISELA COLON

GISELA COLON (Canada, b. 1966) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Colon is an American contemporary artist who has developed a unique vocabulary of “organic minimalism,” breathing life-like qualities into reductive forms. Colon’s oeuvre encompasses several distinct sculptural forms: Pods, Slabs, Monoliths, and Portals. The through-line in all of Colon’s work is the concept of the “mutable object;” the sculptures are conceived as variable objects that transmute their physical qualities through fluctuating movement, varied lighting, changing environmental conditions, and the passage of time.

The Pods are created through a proprietary fabrication method of blow-molding and layering various acrylic materials, producing transformational objects that emanate light and color from within. 

Biography and images via https://www.giselacolon.com/

Copyright © GISELA COLON

* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request by email@artcuratoronline.com

5 Things You Must Know Before You Invest in Art

5 Things You Must Know Before You Invest in Art

Investing in art may seem en vogue or even financially advantageous. But what do art investing novices need to know before diving into this market?
Investing in art may seem en vogue or even financially advantageous. But what do art investing novices need to know before diving into this market?
By – DECEMBER 13, 2018

From “Nu couché (sur le côté gauche)” to “Salvator Mundi”, expensive works of art have been in the news for fetching sale prices of hundreds of millions of dollars. This may intrigue wealthy individuals and lead them to consider adding artwork to their own portfolio of assets. Some may even consider art to be an exciting investment vehicle. In fact, a survey by Deloitte suggests that 76% of art collectors consider their collections as investments, up from 53% in 2012. However, there are several essential considerations for amateur art investors to consider before making their first acquisition.

Value of Global Art Market (billions)

Being an Art Investor Takes Expertise

The first hurdle for investors seeking to get involved with investing in artwork is to develop an understanding of artistic theories and valuation techniques. Unlike investing in public companies or real estate, artwork does not lend itself to traditional investing valuation methods.

Therefore, prudent investors will need to put in a significant amount of effort to learn about artistic methods, art history, specific markets and pricing trends before getting into the action themselves. Fortunately for those that have some type of analytical experience, there are a few helpful data sources available. For example, investors can use the Blouin Art Sales Index to analyse trends in the art market. The platform has an extensive database which allows investors to analyse various artists’ sales records, estimate price bands and locate auctions. Additionally, for those that have a particularly keen interest in learning more about these topics, there are many online and in-person courses offered by Universities and organisations such as Sotheby’s Institute of Art that provide training to understand the fundamentals of art theory, collecting and investing.

Be Aware of the Hidden Costs

In addition the high sticker prices of artwork, investors must be aware of the costs associated with buying and selling these assets. First, in order to ensure that your purchase is valuable, it is crucial to determine that you are purchasing an original work. Therefore, you may want to hire an art inspector if you are relatively new to art investing or purchasing a very expensive piece. Once you have purchased a piece of artwork, you will also have to consider the costs of storing, cleaning and maintaining the piece. This varies greatly based on the age and type artwork (e.g. painting, sculpture, etc.).

Next, unlike stocks or bonds, paintings, sculptures and other types of art are more difficult to sell. In fact, some experts estimate that a mere 0.5% of paintings purchased are ever resold. For this reason, and to ensure that they receive the highest possible price, many individuals elect to sell their pieces through galleries or art dealers. The fee structure of these agents varies, but is typically charged based on a rather high percentage of the sale price. Those confident in their own ability to sell their artwork may be able to dodge fees by selling through online auctions.

Cost of Selling Art

You Don’t Need to Travel to London or New York to Buy Art

While about 60% of global art sales take place in the United States and United Kingdom, art markets elsewhere are growing. For instance, in 2008 China accounted for just 9% of global art sales, but now represents about 20%. Furthermore, major auction houses such as Christie’s, Sotheby’s and Bonhams have locations in Singapore. Additionally, the online art market has grown rapidly, with total online sales up 76% since 2013. These factors indicate that investing in art is increasingly accessible for Singaporeans, who no longer have to travel far to participate in art auctions.

Global Online Art & Antiques Sales by Year

Art Versus Other Investments

While a study Stanford found that artwork investments averaged annual returns of about 6.5% from 1972 to 2010, individuals may find even better returns from more traditional investments such as mutual funds or index funds. For example, the S&P 500 has historically averaged annual returns of about 7% to 10%. For this reason, individuals that view their artwork as simply an investment vehicle may be better off choosing to invest in property or securities. In order to ensure that you maximise your returns, be sure to compare fee structures across brokerage platforms as these fees can eat into your total return. On the other hand, if you enjoy physical ownership of artworks you may be willing to accept the potential of smaller returns from an art investment in comparison to stocks or property. Additionally, some analysts believe that art can be a safer investment as it is less tied to financial markets than stocks or properties. However, it is important to keep in mind that the art market is subject to its own volatility as tastes in artwork can also change over time.

S&P 500 Index

You Don’t Have to Buy a Famous Painting to Invest in Art

If reading more about the reality of art investing has discouraged you from purchasing artwork yourself, there is good news. Through investment funds, it is possible to invest in funds managed by professional art investment managers who have trained expertise in the field. For their services, these funds tend to charge fees of 1% to 5%. While these fees can be more expensive that other types of investment funds, art funds provide access to an exciting area of investing for individuals that are unable to dedicate large amounts of funds to purchasing individual pieces of art. Additionally, seasoned art investors tend to seek out up-and-coming artists in order to purchase potentially valuable art before it garners a reputation and high price tag. You can try finding some of these new artists through websites such as Artsy or Instagram. Furthermore, with enough expertise, you might be able to spot valuable but unrecognised pieces of artwork at the oddest places while travelling.

Originally published on https://www.valuechampion.sg/5-things-you-must-know-you-invest-art-0

William Hofmann

William is a Senior Research Analyst at ValueChampion Singapore, focusing on banking and SMEs. He previously was an Economic Consultant at Industrial Economics Inc

WHAT TO COLLECT # 141. Riccardo Mayr

Riccardo Mayr was born and raised in Ferrara (Italy) a small city, which carries in its streets and buildings the marks of a glorious past.

During the sixteenth century, the cities of the province of Italy’s region Emilia-Romagna —although mostly small in population—were vibrant and quite distinctive, artistically and culturally. The three principal centers, Ferrara, Bologna, and Parma, were especially so, and each had a unique trajectory in both politics and the arts. Ferrara was home to one of the most important humanist courts in the Renaissance, which is known as the Este dukes.
Although small in size, Ferrara was a crucible of Renaissance thought and art. Throughout the fifteenth century, its rulers, the Este family, commissioned works from the greatest contemporary painters, including Giovanni Bellini, Fra Bartolommeo, Raphael, Titian, and Dosso Dossi.

Riccardo grew up in an early Baroque family palazzo located in the center of the city, which is over 500 years old.  The Palazzo has belonged to the Mayr family for more than 200 years.

This “big building” and courtyard garden is like a real time capsule hosting paintings covering a 500 year period collected by Riccardo’s ancestors.  The objects of art, pieces of ancient furniture and family memorabilia ranging from the XVI to the XX Century are a tangible testimony of ancient times, peoples and events.  Living in the Palazzo, surrounded by such tangible testimony of ancient times, he grew up deeply affected by the sense of the passing of time, by century’s old accumulation of dust, by the colors and smells of time.

In the late nineties, while completing his studies as an architect at the University of Ferrara, a couple of casual events marked his sudden and crucial interest in contemporary art. First, in the Palazzo, he would watch his mother learn the technique of oil painting from a Ferrara artist and painter, Emanuele Taglietti collaborator of Riccardo for this project, who himself seemed as if he would visit the palazzo from a past era. 

The second casual event was the visit of the Venice Biennale of 1997 and the casual encounter with the work of such artists as Anselm Kiefer and Christian Boltanski.

From that moment on, Riccardo was not just an architect but also a self-taught painter.

During the nineties to learn how to paint Riccardo started to use unusual materials such as rust, charcoal, ash, lead, iron and mirror debris, materials of his home surroundings. This then brought him to paint with continuity and starting exhibit in Italy and abroad.

Recently, Riccardo’s mother who had been the stoic and ever-present matriarch of the Mayr family and palazzo died of cancer.  The passing of his mother, as well as his father many years prior, required that Riccardo and his sister manage the affairs of the Mayr estate including the collection of paintings put together by their ancestors during the last 200 years. Riccardo was overwhelmed with the daunting task of managing the Mayr estate and deciding the future of the Mayr family.  Riccardo would pace through the palazzo with its big, dark, and treasure-filled rooms, pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family.

Riccardo asked himself if he had to accept passively the relentless passing of time and the succession of the generations. He would ponder if there were anyway, any scenario whereby he could jam this pitiless biological mechanism, even just for a moment.  He would turn his sight to the walls around him, rows of ancient paintings, the testimony of an unquestionable pastime, events, landscapes, and mute portraits of ancestors would stare back at him.  He began thinking about the sense of sacrifice inherent in the religious paintings of the family collection, which is similar to any parent’s sacrifice on behalf children; religious themes, ancient beliefs and offerings for relief.

At one point, Riccardo reminisced about his childhood, running through the sequence of Baroque rooms of the palazzo playing for what seemed like endless games of hide and seek, impersonating characters of the first Star Wars movies, of good versus evil, the bad and the good chasing each other with cardboard light sabers. He thought about his son, now 11 years old who has become his own Star Wars enthusiast, playing like Riccardo would in the same palazzo 35 years earlier in what seems to be the atemporal playground of the Mayr family house and garden.

It was at that point or moment of torment and mourning of his mother, that period of contemplation pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family, that Riccrado connected the dots between his past and present, between centuries old visual art traditions of Ferrara and the cinematic culture we are embedded with cross-culturally today. Riccardo realized there are links between the religious art of the family paintings and the commercial art of the Star Wars saga; both addressing the meaning of sacrifice on behalf of others, redemption and the human need for repentance.

This is the genesis of what is unveiled in this painting project, titled “Religious paintings of the expanded galaxy”  Riccardo commissioned the Ferrara painter who traveled from another era to teach his mother painting techniques and together they created a new technique which integrates into original paintings from the 17th and 18th Century fictitious elements and characters taken from the popular culture of our times, the Star Wars saga. In so doing, the project represents religious faith and ethics in what it is yet a post-modern paradigm largely embedded in fictional reality through an already generational long exposure and fascination with successful science fiction movies.  We also give back to figurative oil paintings a new path to a concept of truth. 

Mayr_Manchildstarwars

*All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 140. DeSoto

THE ARTIST

A creative mind since birth, Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto) has had an extensive journey in the arts. He began to sing at age eighteen and later on compose music in his early twenties. Spending over thirty years in the music industry, Pepe always had a passion for the visual arts. He immersed himself in the world of photography shortly after retiring from music. Over the years, his passion for photography combined with his natural talent in digital art led to the creation and evolution of his signature style known as Fragmented Reality. 

Fragmented Reality is a reflection of human nature. Each subject is divided, broken down into a profusion of feelings. Like a puzzle, an answer lies behind each piece. An unfinished masterpiece yearning for completion.

From this foundation, DeSoto began to create a series of experiments in search of new textures that broke away from traditional color palettes. His newest collection known as Translucent Dimension is a result of a year’s worth of what he calls “artistic discovery.” DeSoto not only discovered new textures but utilized light to create something indescribably beautiful.

The Mother of Pearl effect which he achieved with many of the pieces in Translucent Dimension draws in the viewer and captures them with its abyss of layers. The collection’s ability to give off a luxurious feel adds a touch of class that separates it from traditional art.

“I knew that Fragmented Reality was only the beginning of my work and not the end. The true beauty of art lies in that it is as infinite as the human mind”

— Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto)

OVERBOARD DIVAS.E.L.F.SUN BATHING
* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 138. Pao-Leng Kung

Art Description by Artist Pao Leng Kung

In my works, I magnify some elements during the working process: the erasure of color, the relationship between positive and negative spaces, and the space inside and outside the canvas.

Typically, I use ‘ white’ as a force to expand unlimited space or as an emptiness to fill all the colors by imagination. Also ‘ white’ could refer to the white of exhibition space, gesso, and the natural canvas. Because of this, it opens far more possibilities to transfer the undefined space inside and outside of my paintings.

For the other colors and stripes, they serve as multiple roles within complicatedly interactive layers and transition between positive/ negative spaces. They are the main body that constructs the base for the whole picture, while they are too supporting roles that step by step builds up the existence of negative space.

PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_2PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_3PAO LENG KUNG abstract_painting_4PAO LENG Kung_abstract painting_151327-studyformeschers-ellsworthkelley2c1951

Copyright@Pao Leng Kung

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from the on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 137. Kristóf Szabó

Kristóf Szabó – KristofLab hungarian visual artist.

Artist Statement

My purpose is to involve the spectator into the vision through my works. For me, the exhibition space is a tool which I recreate and retransform into a new space experience that did not exist before by building my works into it. The interaction is crucial for me, I want to create a connection between the spectator, space and work. My artworks are based on the urbanistic lifestyle’s concept. I examine the relations between the areas which can be found in cities, the buildings, means of transport and I interpret them in a specific way. I think that the human’s role and its connection with the environment are essential.

Studies:

2012-2013 Hungarian University of Fine Arts – Master in Visual Education

2011 Hochschule fur Bildende Kunste Dresden (Erasmus scholarship)

2007- 2012 Hungarian University of Fine Arts – Specialisation in Graphic Arts

2003-2007 School of Dance and Fine Arts, Győr

Masters: Alajos Eszik, László Hefter, András Lengyel, Peter Bömmels, Károly István Selényi, Tibor Somorjai Kiss, József Szurcsik

 

M4, installation, 2018_1THINK OUT OF THE BOX_Memorial of Lost Office Workers_4BLOCK series enterierTHINK OUT OF THE BOX_Memorial of Lost Office Workers_3Block IV 120x80cm oil on canvas 2018

***All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 135. NINA RODER

Nina Röder

born in 1983 in Germany and graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from Bauhaus University Weimar with the focus on staged photography. Next, to her artistic activities, she is a Ph.D. candidate with the research topic about performative strategies in contemporary photography.

Nina’s photographic work is exposing hidden structures of biographical stories in which she is combining aspects of the theatre, performance, and stage with the time-based image space of photography. Her photographs have been shown in international exhibitions and photo festivals such as Voicees Off Festival in Arles, the European Month of Photography in Berlin or the Goa Photo Festival in India.

Nina lives and works in Berlin.

grandma's_furkitchennachtkittel

Title of the photography series  by Artist:

WENN DU GEHEN MUST WILLS DU DOCH AUCH BLEIBEN

My grandparents Franz & Theresia Protschka have been expelled after the Second World war from Bohemia and lost everything they had. Therefore it was almost impossible for them to throw anything away when they built up a new life in Germany.

They were both around 90 years old when they died last year. Unfortunately, we had to sell the house both have lived in for more than 60 years. This house in the Franconian province in Germany had been the center for our family.

These pictures were taken in this house when my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and me had to clear and clean the house before we sold it. So the photographs had been realized during the decision process of keeping or giving away all the objects.

One way not being too sad about losing this house with all the memories in it, was to do absurd things in the photographs.

In these pictures, you can see my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and my brother Heiko wearing old clothes of our grandparents.

The title is a quote of my 9-year-old nephew Luis.

How Much Is Your Object Worth? – Researching Your Art

Reposted from https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

It is hard to establish fixed values for antiques, artworks, and other collectible items. The amount asked or offered is determined by many factors, including the condition of the object, personal interests of both the seller and the purchaser, and trends in the market. According to Smithsonian Institution policy, no staff member may offer monetary evaluations. However, the following guidelines should help you find an approximate value for your artwork.

First, consult price guides to determine current sale and auction prices. Some price guides are available on the Internet, but most come in books or offline formats. Specialized university or art museum libraries and larger public libraries often carry these guides. Price indexes are usually published annually and cover international auctions and galleries.

PRICE GUIDES

ADEC: International Art Prices
Art Sales Index
Davenport’s Art Reference & Price Guide
International Auction Records
Leonard’s Annual Price Index of Art Auctions

For prints, check the following resources:

Gordon’s Print Price Annual
Contemporary Print Portfolio
Lawrence’s Dealer Print Prices International

ONLINE PRICING RESOURCES

invaluable.com

artprice.com

artnet.com

AskArt.com

FindArtinfo.com

MutualArt.com

APPRAISALS & APPRAISERS

Consider finding an appraiser to determine the value of your artwork. Appraisers are trained specialists who work for a fee. They evaluate your piece and give you a written statement of its value. Although the following organizations do not provide appraisals themselves, they each publish a directory of their members. Always seek an appraiser with an expertise in the type of artwork you own.

American Society of Appraisers
11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 310
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 478-2228 or 1-800-ASA-VALU
www.appraisers.org

Appraisers Association of America
212 West 35th Street, 11th Floor South
New York, NY 10001
(212) 889-5404
www.appraisersassoc.org

International Society of Appraisers
303 West Madison Street, Suite 2650
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 981-6778
www.isa-appraisers.org

AUCTION HOUSES

Some auction houses host free “open house” days where visitors can bring in their artworks and have auction-house staff members share their expertise. Other houses allow owners to mail their information with a photograph, and their experts will respond. To find an auction house in your area, search online for “fine art auction houses.”

Originally published on https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

WHAT TO COLLECT # 133. Danielle Cohen

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

I am trying to test the body and fuzziness as they appear in my private life, I deal with gender, pain, relationship or entity.
I Especially enjoyed testing the limits of suffering, the border between Erotica pornography and documentary as well as the line between the
personal and intimate private and public spheres. I test my conflict with myself many times in feminine and seductive that is far away from my own self-image and gender when I ascribe to a new image that I create diverse deflections that are associated with such dissemblance.

I disguise myself a lot, but always in order to reveal, sometimes up to the  stem cells and nerves, and the friction with the viewer is
somewhere between pleasure and pain, exciting and delightful.
My occupation with boundaries is almost obsessive , I can say decisively that there is an interface between art and my personal life, and I can hardly separate the two. I place myself in situations that are discomforting to me  and even threaten me, and the discomfort I feel brings out of me something that I feel  Satisfied with.

Images from collection: FASHION & FINE ART

Find more on https://www.daniellecohendinar.com/

Copyright © Danielle Cohen Dinar

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 128. Cristina Coral

Educated in Italy where she lives and works as a photographer.
Her approach to photography and its development was almost entirely self-taught.
She has lived her childhood in an artistic environment.
Her father was a composer, music and art have always been a very important part of her life. She has chosen the camera as my main artistic expression since 2012.

If you would like to know something more or for info about art purchases you can write to : cristinacoral@yahoo.it

Artworks by Cristina Coral are available as limited edition prints, professionally printed on museum quality archival paper.
I guarantee max. 20 or 10 copies of 1 artwork in different sizes as a limited edition.
Each artwork is signed and numbered on the reverse of the photograph and certificate.

Originally published here

Copyright © Cristina Coral

Cristina-Coral-2Cristina-Coral-10curtain_8_670DSC_0195_1340_cDSC_0984-copia_800

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 127. KAWS

Born in 1974 in Jersey City, NJ, USA

Lives and works in New York, USA

Considered one of the most relevant artists of his generation, KAWS engages audiences beyond the museums and galleries in which he regularly exhibits. His prolific body of influential work straddles the worlds of art and design to include paintings, murals, large-scale sculptures, street art, and graphics and product design. Over the last two decades, KAWS has built a successful career with work that consistently shows his formal agility as an artist, as well as his underlying wit, irreverence, and affection for our times. He often draws inspiration and appropriates from pop culture animations to form a unique artistic vocabulary for his works across various mediums.

Now admired for his larger-than-life sculptures and hard edge paintings that emphasize line and color, KAWS’ cast of hybrid cartoon and human characters are perhaps the strongest examples of his exploration of humanity. His refined graphics language revitalizes figuration with big, bold gestures and keen, playful intricacy. As seen in his collaborations with global brands, KAWS’ imagery possesses a sophisticated humor and reveals a thoughtful interplay with consumer products. Highly sought-after by collectors inside and outside of the art world, KAWS’ artworks, with their broad appeal, establishes him as one of the most prominent artists in today’s culture.

KAWS (b. 1974, Jersey City, New Jersey; lives and works in Brooklyn, New York) has exhibited internationally in major museums. His recent solo exhibitions include KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2016) which traveled to the Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); KAWS, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Longside Gallery, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (2016). His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2017); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga, Spain (2014); Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas (2013); Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia (2013); and the High Art Museum, Atlanta, Georgia (2011).

His monumental sculptures have been shown in prestigious locations including the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, United Kingdom and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

KAWS Is Bringing a Giant Floating Figure to Seoul’s Seokchon… https://hypebeast.com/2018/6/kaws-holiday-seokchon-lake-seoul-korea

COPYRIGHT @ by KAWS

Originally published on https://www.perrotin.com/artists/Kaws/55/view-of-the-exhibition-where-the-end-starts-curated-by-andrea-karnes-at-modern-art-museum-of-fort-worth-fort-worth-usa-2016/10000012698

#art #installation #kaws #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog #ArtForYou

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 125. SOFIA BONATI

Sofia Bonati

What I enjoy most is playing with textures and color combinations.

Sofia Bonati is an Argentinian artist currently living in Surrey, United Kingdom. She was born in Buenos Aires in 1982 into a family of artists, and started her artistic career when she moved to the UK in 2013. In addition to her studio practice, she has also developed a career as an illustrator, with clients such as Iberia (Spain), Vanity Fair (France) and Mondadori (Italy). Working mostly in pencil and wet media on paper, Bonati imbues her female gures and portraits with surrealistic elements, seemingly granting them the powers of the animals, plants, and objects that adorn them. Smooth, focused pencil drawing of realistic portraiture grounds each subject in the midst of flowing, dream-like surroundings, creating stunningly beautiful, imagined tableaus.

Copyright @ SOFIA BONATI

https://www.behance.net/Soffronia

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT #124. Pablo Thecuadro

Born in 1992. From Zaragoza but he lives and works in Madrid. There’s only one thing he loves the most: to create images.

Essential but powerful collages, in which Pablo Thecuadro mixes different techniques: from the cut by hand to digital techniques.

Pablo Thecuadro collages go beyond the simply combination of beautiful images; they include the concept of duality in the human being.

His work is a deep, elegant and abstract exploration that brings back to reality, to the human essence.

Copyright @ by Pablo Thecuadro

Read the interview with Artist on https://www.thefashionatlas.com/en/atlas_en/photography_en/the-abstract-collages-by-spanish-artist-pablo-thecuadro.php#prettyPhoto

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com