What to Collect # 144 NICK ERVINCK

NICK ERVINCK (° 1981) graduated in 2003 from the KASK (Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Ghent) with a master’s degree in Mixed Media. He then trained in computer modeling, sculpting and working with materials such as polyester, plaster and wood. After teaching at art academies in Tielt, Menen and Kortrijk (2004-2012), he returned to the KASK to spend three years as a visiting professor here. His work consists of large installations, handmade and 3D printed sculptures, ceramics, prints, drawings, light boxes and animated films.

As diverse as this art production may be, above all, he remains fascinated by the “negative space” as he discovered it with classical sculptors such as Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth. The finding that a “hole” in matter is such a young idea will probably haunt him for the rest of his life. As a child of his time, he plays a varying game between the physical and virtual world, using both classic and new craftsmanship (computers, 3D printing and milling). From here he explores in his own unique way classical themes such as man (with a focus on his anatomy and the emergence of cyborgs), plants (especially their genetic manipulation), masks and animals, always starting from an (art) historical background that he cuts with contemporary pop and sci-fi culture.

Watch Instagram Live with Gallery Think+feel Contemporary , Nick Ervinck and our Curator Masha Melnik here
Please, find more information about Artist here

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All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

Why Love Generative Art? Article by Jason Bailey

Over the last 50 years, our world has turned digital at breakneck speed. No art form has captured this transitional time period – our time period – better than generative art. Generative art takes full advantage of everything that computing has to offer, producing elegant and compelling artworks that extend the same principles and goals artists have pursued from the inception of modern art.

Geometry, abstraction, and chance are important themes not just for generative art, but for all art of 20th Century. As an art historian and an amateur generative artist, I see a clear line of influence on generative art starting from Cézanne and shooting straight through to the:

  • Fracturing of geometry in Analytical Cubism

  • Emphasis on technology, machine aesthetic, and mechanized production from Futurism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus

  • Introduction of autonomy and chance in Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism

  • Anti-figurative aesthetic, bold geometry, and intense color of Neoplasticism, Suprematism, Hard-edged Abstraction, and OpArt

  • Use of algorithms by Sol Lewitt and others

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_501″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 510.78125px”>  Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth  - Hilma af Klint, 1907

Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_523″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 475px”>  Suprematist Composition -  Kasimir Malevich, 1916

Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_541″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 392.953125px”>  Circles in a Circle  - Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_560″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 400px”>  Highway and Byways  - Paul Klee, 1928

Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_578″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 380px”>  Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)  - Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_597″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 410.203125px”>  Concentric Squares  - Josef Albers, 1941

Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941