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10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 133. Danielle Cohen

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

I am trying to test the body and fuzziness as they appear in my private life, I deal with gender, pain, relationship or entity.
I Especially enjoyed testing the limits of suffering, the border between Erotica pornography and documentary as well as the line between the
personal and intimate private and public spheres. I test my conflict with myself many times in feminine and seductive that is far away from my own self-image and gender when I ascribe to a new image that I create diverse deflections that are associated with such dissemblance.

I disguise myself a lot, but always in order to reveal, sometimes up to the  stem cells and nerves, and the friction with the viewer is
somewhere between pleasure and pain, exciting and delightful.
My occupation with boundaries is almost obsessive , I can say decisively that there is an interface between art and my personal life, and I can hardly separate the two. I place myself in situations that are discomforting to me  and even threaten me, and the discomfort I feel brings out of me something that I feel  Satisfied with.

Images from collection: FASHION & FINE ART

Find more on https://www.daniellecohendinar.com/

Copyright © Danielle Cohen Dinar

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 131. JOHN BROOKS

His work is playful, creepy, energising and anthropomorphic. Stare at these fuzzy wonders long enough and you would swear you saw a heart beat or a leg twitch. This small body of work packs a lot of punch both visually and conceptually. The work stands as a kind of strange timeline not just from one year of fashion to the next but a sort of endless amount of time in between.Brooks fuses weaving techniques into his textile based art pieces bridging that invisible gap between craft and conceptual art.

Please, find more information http://www.johnbrooks.com.au/new-page/

Copyright @ John Brooks

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 130. Anish Kapoor

Mirroring its surroundings to reflect a rose-tinted microcosm of ambient space, UntitledANISH KAPOOR - UNTITLED, stainless steel and paint, 120 by 120 by 27.5cm., Executed in 2010 is an exquisite example of Anish Kapoor’s inimitable investigation into the possibilities of interior and exterior space. Seeming to float effortlessly in suspense above the ground, Kapoor’s dish appears to simultaneously curve outwards and inwards, distorting perception and awareness as our gaze passes across it. The luminous reflectivity of the surface radiates light, and emits a sense of meditative calm and repose. Untitledinvites contemplation: by circumnavigating the work we become an integral part of the whole, thus making every viewer’s experience of the piece subtly different.
Untitled forms part of Kapoor’s iconic corpus of mirrored sculptures, in which the possibilities of the circular format in a range of reflective materials and colors are explored. The seductive red of the present work, however, is of particular significance. Kapoor has always considered red to be a highly symbolic color, and many of his most important large-scale works – such as Marsyas, My Red Homeland (both 2003) Past, Present, Future (2006) and Svayambh (2007) – have been executed in varying shades of red. Kapoor has spoken of the importance of red in his work: “I use red a lot… It’s true that in Indian culture red is a powerful thing; it is the color a bride wears; it is associated with the matriarchal, which is central to Indian psychology. So I can see what leads me there culturally, but there’s more to it. One of the ways color has been used in art since the Eighteenth Century is to move, as in Turner, from color to light. I tend to go from color to darkness. Red has a very powerful blackness. This overt color, this open and visually beckoning color, also associates itself with a dark interior world. And that’s the real reason I’m interested in it” (Anish Kapoor in conversation with Nicholas Baume in Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Anish Kapoor: Past, Present, Future, 2008, p. 31).

Untitled also invites connections with the idea of the Sublime, in particular, the post-modern version of the concept as posited by Jean-François Lyotard. Lyotard argued that certain examples of contemporary art sought to represent ideas or themes which were impossible to truly delineate in physical form, thus arousing sensations of awe and bewilderment in the viewer as we are forced to confront concepts our mind is unable to truly comprehend. Lyotard viewed the work of Barnett Newman – with its walls of pure color undisturbed by figural or objective concerns – as being the ultimate exponent of the post-modern Sublime; yet, Kapoor’s mirrored works arguably also fulfill the conditions of post-modern Sublimity in their profound exploration of complex theory and philosophy through a totally abstract dialectic. The shimmering surfaces and the curved space of the series of wall mounted mirror installations induce a corresponding sense of disorienting arrest, not only cognitively but also physically and spatially. Indeed, the Sublime has been of abiding fascination for Kapoor throughout his career, and he has frequently spoken of the idea about his mirrored works: “It seemed it was not a mirrored object but an object full of mirroredness. The spatial questions it seemed to ask were not about deep space but about present space, which I began to think about as a new sublime. If the traditional sublime is in deep space, then this is proposing that the contemporary sublime is in front of the picture plane, not beyond it. I continue to make these works because I feel this is a whole new spatial adventure” (Anish Kapoor quoted in ibid., p. 52). As an object of immense beauty and commanding authority, Untitled is a masterful encapsulation of Kapoor’s highly assured manipulation of spatial territory.

Originally published on Sotheby’s

Copyright © Anish Kapoor http://anishkapoor.com/

Another works by Artist

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***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

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BEST WAY TO APPROACH A GALLERY

For me, one of the most intriguing moments for the contemporary art, that this is a human way of speaking about our transformations. From the personal prospectives to the outside world we are studying identities in action through the different art technics.
I see art as a dominant element which contains a range of conceptual meanings and theoretical roles associated with it.LAY OUT 1 idea masha

If you think that your work has a strong manifestation and deserves the personal attention of the gallery, you shouldn’t wait with submission.

Check out galleries that you think may like your work. Start to explore art spaces near you.
Get to know the artists they are showing already. Check the art fairs the gallery featured. At the beginning of your ambitious career, you need to explore the galleries background before sending the application.

Once you’ve determined which gallery or galleries you are interested in, you should carefully prepare your presentation. Better, have all of these at your fingertips already, but if not, now is the time to start. I recommend using professional templates to make the statement or hire a professional consulting. It is a first, and probably, could be the last insight about your work for the art institution.
You have to explain, your passion for working with particular gallery or curator to present a unique piece. Be able to analyze if necessary that there are no analogs on the art market.

If a gallery has a submissions policy, be sure to abide by that. If not, they’ll toss your work in the trash. Don’t hesitate to contact a gallery and get their guidelines.

When you submit your work via email or postal mail, be sure that your letter is professional. Always put the name of the person you need to contact. Google it, ask someone, or contact the gallery itself- just find out!

Put together your bio, statement, portfolio, and any other relevant information they could check about you on social media. Be aware, the galleries and art show may ask different details of your background.

Also, if you send your information via email, be sure to use small image files. If you load down their inbox, they won’t be happy, or they may not even receive your information at all. It could bounce or end up in a spam filter. So keep it small- 4MB total is best.
Perhaps the last advice would be to prepare your masterpiece for the showing. I will not recommend sending a submission of the same work to the few galleries. The limits are one of the keys to the success.

Wishing you good luck!

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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