WHAT TO COLLECT # 135. NINA RODER

Nina Röder

born in 1983 in Germany and graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from Bauhaus University Weimar with the focus on staged photography. Next, to her artistic activities, she is a Ph.D. candidate with the research topic about performative strategies in contemporary photography.

Nina’s photographic work is exposing hidden structures of biographical stories in which she is combining aspects of the theatre, performance, and stage with the time-based image space of photography. Her photographs have been shown in international exhibitions and photo festivals such as Voicees Off Festival in Arles, the European Month of Photography in Berlin or the Goa Photo Festival in India.

Nina lives and works in Berlin.

grandma's_furkitchennachtkittel

Title of the photography series  by Artist:

WENN DU GEHEN MUST WILLS DU DOCH AUCH BLEIBEN

My grandparents Franz & Theresia Protschka have been expelled after the Second World war from Bohemia and lost everything they had. Therefore it was almost impossible for them to throw anything away when they built up a new life in Germany.

They were both around 90 years old when they died last year. Unfortunately, we had to sell the house both have lived in for more than 60 years. This house in the Franconian province in Germany had been the center for our family.

These pictures were taken in this house when my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and me had to clear and clean the house before we sold it. So the photographs had been realized during the decision process of keeping or giving away all the objects.

One way not being too sad about losing this house with all the memories in it, was to do absurd things in the photographs.

In these pictures, you can see my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and my brother Heiko wearing old clothes of our grandparents.

The title is a quote of my 9-year-old nephew Luis.

What We Learned from Writing 7,000 Artist Bios

Reposted October 24, 2018, from Artsy

Communication is increasingly being reduced to 140 characters, emojis, and voice memos. Despite this, clear prose remains a powerful sales and branding tool within the art world, and beyond.

Artsy has created over 7,000 artist bios, and over the years we’ve learned a few things about what our audience of collectors and art lovers finds valuable when discovering new art. Since Artsy’s partners can now add their own artist bios, we decided to take this opportunity to invite Jessica Backus, the Director of Artsy Learning and The Art Genome Project, to share some insights into what makes for a compelling bio and how to eloquently summarize an artist’s practice in 120 words.

If you have—or are planning to include—artist biographies on your website, this article was written for you. Read on for our best practices, mistakes to avoid, and a few SEO tips for your gallery’s artist bios.

GALLERY INSIGHTS
BY JESSICA BACKUS
MAY 12TH, 2016 8:53 PM
Detail from Brie Ruais’s studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Detail from Brie Ruais’s studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

_______________
Why Write A Bio?

An artist bio is often the first piece of information available to readers and collectors, and as such it offers you a chance to frame their practice and give collectors a reason to want to learn more. Bios also drive search engine optimization (SEO). When returning search results, Google and other search engines privilege written content that is “sticky” (i.e. readers spend time on the page and continue browsing), so providing an engaging, well-written bio is a great way to increase discoverability for your artists.

These are the three cornerstones—tried, tested, and used today by our writers at Artsy—of the perfect artist bio:

The bio should summarize the artist’s practice—including medium(s), themes, techniques, and influences.

The bio should open with a first line that encapsulates, as far as possible, what is most significant about the artist and his or her work, rather than opening with biographical tidbits, such as where the artist went to school, grew up, etc. For example, John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus.

The profile should be between 80 and 140 words. The ideal bio is ~120 words, though a tightly written 80-word bio is preferable to a longer bio that includes repetition and filler sentences.

Why 120 Words?

Audience engagement researchers at museums have found that visitors lose interest in wall labels after 150 words. Our philosophy for artist bios is to leave your reader wanting more by limiting your word count to ~120 words. At most, a reader should take away one or two key points.

If you want to provide a more definitive overview of an artist’s practice, consider other channels, such as a press release or a blog post (Artsy Preferred and Premium subscribers can create posts using Writer, our in-house publishing tool).

Portrait of Ryan Foerster by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Portrait of Ryan Foerster by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

____________________________________
Questions to consider when writing about an artist’s practice

Physical

What medium/media does the artist work in?
What is his or her style like?
What work or works can you talk about that will give a visual description of the above qualities?

Subject matter

What are common or characteristic themes depicted in the artist’s work?
What subjects drive the works or provide underlying themes?

Art-Historical

Why is this artist important?
What impact has this artist made on history, or what precedent has he or she set in art-making? What other artists have impacted the artist’s practice?
How does this artist redefine a medium or media?
Who are the artist’s peers or teachers?

Context

In what political or technological climate is the artist working in? I.e. what historical or political events might have influenced the work?

Popular Culture

What areas of the arts or popular culture does this artist incorporate into his or her work?
What other areas of the arts or popular culture does this artist engage with? E.g. creating theatrical sets, costumes, music videos, etc.

Quotes

Can any of the above questions be answered in a brief (1–2 sentences), an engaging quotation from the artist?

Detail from Genieve Figgis’s County Wicklow studio by Doreen Kilfeather for Artsy.
Detail from Genieve Figgis’s County Wicklow studio by Doreen Kilfeather for Artsy.

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6 Most Common Mistakes in Artist Bios

Hyperbolic praise

It can be tempting to sing your artists’ praises. We’ve noticed, however, that readers do not respond positively to unsubstantiated claims about an artist’s import (e.g. “Artist X is considered one of the most important artists of the post-war period,” or, “Artist Y is widely regarded for her beautiful work”). Most readers will see right through trumped-up language and, even worse, may become skeptical of the rest of your program. The best way to maximize the power of a good bio is to try to educate, not “hard-sell,” your reader. Numerous studies have shown that the hard sell doesn’t work, especially for younger audiences (read: tech-savvy collectors), who respond most positively to simple and authentic messages.

The “laundry list of accomplishments”

We recommend keeping exhibition highlights and accolades to a minimum (readers who are interested can refer to the artist’s CV). Impressive as these may be, these laundry lists are tedious to read in prose format. They also take up precious real estate, which you could otherwise devote to a real discussion of your artist’s practice.

There are certainly instances where it makes sense to include one particularly outstanding prize or exhibition, for example, an artist’s inclusion in the Venice Biennale. In this case, try to find a way to naturally include mention of the distinction in the normal flow of the text.

Artspeak

Misplaced academic jargon and pseudo-theoretical writing are almost universally despised. Instead of trying to impress other curators, academics, and galleries focus on your audience of new collectors who may be completely unfamiliar with your artists. Readers want to glean information from your writing, and the best way to do that is to use simple language. A good rule of thumb is to impart one idea per sentence.

Spelling and Punctuation

Nothing undermines the credibility of your content more quickly than spelling and grammar mistakes. When writing, some best practices are:

Use a serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) to ensure proper formatting of “smart” or curly quotes
Make sure you have the spell check function turned on, and that your language preferences are set to English
Have at least one other person, if not two, read over your text
Don’t forget to put exhibition titles in quotations (e.g., “Greater New York”), and artwork titles in italics (e.g., La Vie, 1903)

Duplicating (or omitting) artist’s nationality, birth year, and death year

It is a common convention in most art writing to include an artist’s nationality, birth year, and death year upon first mention (for example, Alexander Calder [American, 1898–1976]). However, many online databases (including Artsy) store these facts as metadata fields that accompany the artist’s name (see above). Understand how your bio will appear and omit (or include) this information accordingly to ensure consistent formatting and keep clutter to a minimum.

Letting bios get stale

For young artists with rapidly evolving careers, be sure to check back every year, or before new exhibitions, to re-assess what the most important aspects of your artist’s practice are.

—Jessica Backus

We hope that these tips will help you create compelling and effective artist bios (see examples of our favorite artist bios below). Stay tuned for upcoming Gallery Insights editions, including Part 3 of our Art Fairs series, a special edition on selling to tech collectors, and a mini-course on SEO for galleries. In the meantime, learn more about Artsy Gallery Partnerships.

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Our Favorite Artist Bios

HISTORICAL ARTISTS

Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early non-objective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated performance art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making monumental outdoor sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

John Chamberlain

John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus. “My work has nothing to do with car wrecks,“ he has said. “I believe common materials are the best materials.” With its emphasis on paint finishes and the raw materials’ lines and seams, his work has been described as a kind of three-dimensional abstract expressionist painting. While his breakthrough work dates from the 1960s, most recently he has worked with large-scale photography.

HISTORICALLY OVERLOOKED ARTISTS

Carol Rama

In her decades-spanning practice, Carol Rama has explored sexuality and desire through different materials and mediums. Self-taught, Rama began painting as a means of dealing with family tragedies. In her early work in the 1930s and 1940s, she created lustful images of the female body, highlighting sexuality and pleasure as major themes. Rama later experimented with abstraction and assemblage in the vein of arte povera, using bicycle tires from her father’s factory before he declared bankruptcy and committed suicide. She returned to making paintings and watercolors in the 1980s. The recipient of the Golden Lion at the 50th Venice Biennale, Rama falls outside the confines of any particular artistic movement or period, but she remains a seminal figure and an important influence to artists such as Cindy Sherman and Kiki Smith.

ESTABLISHED LIVING ARTISTS

Christopher Williams

The often-opaque themes in Christopher Williams’s works have in common the artist’s fascination with obsolescence and the relationship between photographs and the objects they document. Known for his high-gloss, crisply focused photographs, reminiscent of the commercial photography of a bygone era, Williams’s subjects range from stacked Ritter Sport chocolate bars to old cameras that have outlived their usefulness. Williams ironically references the practice of retouching in advertising by highlighting the small but conspicuous imperfections in his own subjects or, as in the case of Kodak Three Point Reflection Guide, © 1968 Eastman Kodak Company, 1968 (Corn) (2003), trying to ‘sell’ a food item that is clearly made out of plastic. Former Editor-in-Chief of Artforum Tim Griffin described Williams’s approach as “sociophotographic,” meaning that the work explores underlying codes within photography, advertising, and ethnography.

EARLY- AND MID-CAREER ARTISTS

Tal R

Tal R uses the word kolbojnik, meaning “leftovers” in Hebrew, to describe his practice of sourcing and collecting a wide range of imagery, figurative and abstract, from high and low culture. Like work by Donald Baechler, Maira Kalman, and Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tal R’s paintings, with their bold brushstrokes, colorful patterns, and exuberantly painted imagery, give the false impression of childlike simplicity. Interested in creation myths and darker themes, Tal R always conveys a sense of joy and generosity of spirit.

EMERGING DESIGNERS

Chris Schanck

Furniture designer Chris Schanck is interested in materials and design processes that are not traditionally associated with luxury, mass-production, and standards of perfection. “If we accept the idea that [an object] doesn’t have to be reproducible and doesn’t have to mimic a commercial form or process, then what are the limits of that?” Schanck asks. Among his best-known pieces are those that comprise his “ALUfoil” series, in which industrial or discarded materials are covered in aluminum foil, painted, and then sealed with resin. The final pieces are both durable and light. His methods characteristically involve both marginalized techniques as well as the help of marginalized members of his Detroit community. Schanck has a background in commercial model-making and has produced commissioned works for Tom Ford.

Originally posted on Artsy

Millennials are shaping the art market’s future

The “2018 Insights on Wealth and Worth — Art Collectors” survey by U.S. Trust revealed that millennials are now the fastest growing segment of art collectors. Growing up with technology by their side, millennials—born between 1982 and 1998—have different values and buying habits than generations before them. Faced with these shifting demographics, what is your gallery doing to reach millennial collectors?

UBS’s 2017 “Millennials — the global guardians of capital” report explained that millennials, who currently account for roughly $17 trillion of global wealth, consistently prioritize “convenience, multi-channel delivery, and transparency.” So, how does this behavior translate to the art world?

To begin, millennials are “more transactional” than their predecessors, the boomers. Many view art as a capital asset, and are likely to sell and trade with more frequency. And not surprisingly—since millennials are also adapting to the online art market at an unparalleled velocity—78% of millennials bought art online in 2018.

This suggests a positive trajectory for the online art market, which is estimated to reach $8.37 billion by 2023. A recent ArtTactic report revealed that “63% of Gen Y (millennials) intend to buy more art online than last year,” and 57% of millennial buyers either prefer buying online or have no preference at all between a website and a brick-and-mortar space.

The article also made note of the increase in using platforms like Instagram to discover artists, as well as the surge in buying art on a mobile device—up to 20% from 4% in 2015.

From financial institutions to luxury brands, businesses around the world have had to adapt to millennial consumer behavior. Market forces are beginning to demand that galleries, dealers, and auction houses do the same. Do you feel the need to cultivate a network of millennial collectors?

Kind Regards,

Saskia Clifford-Mobley

Head of Gallery Partnerships, Europe, Middle East, and Africa

Originally published on Artsy.net

Also read, 2018 Insights on Wealth and Worth – Art Collectors | U.S. Trust

Photo credit by Masha Melnik, 2018

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 121. ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol

American, 1928–1987

Inspired by the portraits that Man Ray photographed of Marcel Duchamp’s alter ego, Rrose Sélavy, Andy Warhol created a series of drag self-portraits. Always questioning the conventions of constructed identity, Warhol donned a wig and bold makeup, subverting traditional gender expectations and paying homage to the artists before him.

Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981

Gelatin silver print

Image: 3.5 x 2.25 in. (8.89 x 5.72 cm.)

Sheet: 4.25 x 3.4 in. (10.8 x 8.64 cm.)

American Pop Art icon Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was known for taking photographic portraits of his many friends in and outside of the art world. The photographic medium was critical to Warhol’s artistic production, and he brought his camera with him wherever he went. His photographic oeuvre reads like today’s ubiquitous social media photo streams and provides a fascinating look into the life of an enigmatic figure whose influence on the art world, and society as a whole, is unparalleled. Playing with the notions of identity, perception, and one’s public versus private self, Warhol also took many poignant self-portraits, often in drag, as seen here.

Originally it was published on

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/andy-warhol/self-portrait-in-drag-8

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram

7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram
ELENA SOBOLEVA
MAY 15TH, 2015 3:17 PM

Following up on part one of our Instagram survey (How Collectors Use Instagram To Buy Art), which brought to light the importance of this social media channel as a tool for sales, we are excited to share the second half of our findings for galleries, which focus on how collectors want to be engaged on Instagram.

1. Collectors on Instagram Expect a Human Touch.

Collectors want personality. 70% of collectors prefer to follow an individual’s Instagram account (belonging to the gallery owner or staff) over the general gallery account. Nearly half of surveyed collectors want to follow gallery owners directly.

Create separate accounts for the gallery owner and staff. Developing individual accounts in tandem with the gallery’s main one will allow for more personal interaction with potential clients, feedback, and an opportunity to start a conversation.

Tip: The official gallery account can (and should) be used for gallery-wide updates, and is great for branding, but collectors crave the inside scoop. Great examples include Andrea Rosen, Zach Feuer, and James Fuentes.
2. Collectors Use #Hashtags Before They Buy.

Among surveyed collectors who use Instagram, 42% claim they often (or very often) look up an artist’s hashtag (#ArtistName) before purchasing their work. Only 6% say they never do this, meaning that 94% of collectors search by hashtag at some point.

#Hashtags enable collectors to instantly aggregate an artist’s content and also reveal public support for an artist. Curators, influencers, and press who have posted their works serve as another seal of approval for collectors. Include artist hashtags to highlight your latest inventory, studio views, and related content.

Tip: Use hashtags specific to an event or area (i.e. #FriezeNY), but don’t overwhelm your followers. Include your gallery hashtag (i.e. #DavidZwirner, #WhiteCube) on brochures and other marketing materials. Visitors to openings and events who use this “official” hashtag serve as brand ambassadors for your business.

#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by  Clemens Kois for Artsy.
#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by Clemens Kois for Artsy.

3. Convert Followers to New Collectors.

Our survey found that nearly half of collectors (46%) are most likely to follow gallery accounts they have already purchased work from. Still, over half follow gallery accounts they either view as tastemakers (27%) or from whom they want to buy (27%).

To capitalize on this purchase intent, make sure your Instagram bio includes contact details so collectors can reach you. Include a physical gallery address, your gallery’s official hashtag, and a link to your website (or your Artsy profile, whichever is a better collector experience).

Tip: To make your bio stand out, format your text outside of Instagram and copy + paste it back into Instagram. We recommend the Notes app, which allows you to add line breaks and special characters.

4. Collectors Want Your Attention.

A common complaint from collectors is that their comments and questions are often ignored, potentially turning them off a gallery. Make it a habit to reply to comments (setting a daily reminder helps), and offer to continue the conversation with potential buyers offline. Additionally, browse through images that others post of your artists and gallery (see #2 above) and like or comment where appropriate. Going the extra mile to engage collectors is a no-brainer. If you don’t already have a social media associate, consider hiring an intern for a 3-month test.

Tip: Maintain the quality of your account by deleting inappropriate or spammy comments on your Instagram photos. On an iPhone, click the comment icon to access the comments, swipe to the left on the comment, and click the trash icon.

5. Make Your Artists Collaborators.

Because collectors actively research and follow artists on Instagram, consider involving artists you represent in collaborations or account takeovers leading up to an opening. Find creative ways to involve your artists with account takeovers, meetups, and hashtag projects to give your followers more personal experiences.

Tip: Collectors told us that they want to follow accounts that show personality, but offer a balance. Check out Artsy’s #ArtWorldSpaces campaign for ideas.
6. Think Globally, Post Locally.

Following closely behind “an imbalance of photos” (posting too much of one type of photo), over-posting was the second most popular reason collectors said they would unfollow someone. We recommend posting a maximum of twice per day and scheduling your posts with purpose. Posting at the wrong time (for most of your followers) means that your content is less likely to be viewed, and much less engaged with.

Tip: Use the “two birds, one stone” adage, and aim to reach key locations during primetime: If you have galleries in NYC and Rome, posting by 6 PM makes sense, but midnight doesn’t.

7. Post Content That Collectors Want To See From Galleries.

When asked what they enjoy most about a gallery’s Instagram feed, more collectors chose “behind the scenes content” (i.e. studio visits and installation day) than “museum shows,” “art fair coverage,” “announcements,” and “gallery views” combined! At a close second was “first look at new inventory.”

And a final note to put things in perspective: While the platform’s influence on art buying behavior is clearly growing, Instagram is but one additional outlet for your digital content. Instagram should be a part of your content strategy and not its own end. Use it for what it is, and don’t forget to enjoy the process!

Originally posted on ARTSY

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

WHAT TO COLLECT # 117. ANNETTE KELM

Annette KELM was born 1975 in Stuttgart, Germany. She currently lives and works in Berlin.

Kelm is interested in typologies, models of mass production, the function of objects and the nature of their representation, and stylistic developments in patterned textiles, design, and technology. In her work she conflates several genres in single images or in series on a single motif that combine a variety of artistic, historical, and cross-cultural references. Taken with large- and medium-format analog cameras and individually printed by hand, her carefully composed pictures appear not unlike advertisements. But their sense of precise objectivity is undercut by artifice and strangeness: Kelm turns out baffling narratives, such as that in Untitled (Cardboard, Paisley, Ladder, Hands), in which the typically concealed photographic setup unexpectedly crops up within the picture frame.

MOMA

Copyright @ Annette KELM

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 113. NAUM GABO

Naum Gabo, original name Naum Neemia Pevsner (born August 5, 1890, Bryansk, Russia—died August 23, 1977, Waterbury, Connecticut, U.S.), pioneering Constructivist sculptor who used materials such as glass, plastic, and metal and created a sense of spatial movement in his work.

Gabo studied medicine and natural science, then philosophy and art history, at the University of Munich in Germany; he also took engineering classes at the Technical University in Munich. In 1913 he walked from Munich to Florence and Venice, viewing many works of art and architecture along the way. Early in his life he changed his name to Gabo in order to distinguish himself from his brother Antoine Pevsner, a painter.

While visiting Pevsner in Paris in 1913–14, Gabo met the artist Alexander Archipenko and others involved with the avant-garde. During World War I he lived with Pevsner in Oslo, Norway. There, Gabo produced his first Cubist-influenced figurative sculptures, exemplified by Constructed Head No. 2 (1916), which he executed in celluloid and metal. The brothers also began to experiment along the Constructivist lines laid down by their fellow Russian Vladimir Tatlin. Constructivist sculpture as practiced by Tatlin had definite political implications, but Gabo was more interested in its use of modern technology and industrial materials.

Returning to Russia after the Revolution, Gabo and Pevsner saw political forces redirect Russian art from exploration to propaganda. In 1920 the two brothers issued the Realistic Manifesto of Constructivism, which they posted and distributed in the streets of Moscow. In it they asserted that art had a value and function independent of the state, and that geometric principles should be the basis for sculpture. They advocated the use of transparent materials to define volumes of empty space instead of solid mass. In 1920 Gabo produced Kinetic Composition, a motor-driven sculpture that demonstrated his principles by incorporating elements of space and time.

Gabo left Russia in 1922 and lived for 10 years in Berlin, where he worked with László Moholy-Nagy and other artists of the Bauhaus. During the 1920s Gabo continued to create monumental constructions out of glass, metal, and plastic. In 1932 he went to Paris, where he joined the Abstraction-Création group, an association of artists that advocated pure abstraction. He lived in England from 1936 to 1946, promoting Constructivism there by editing the collective manifesto Circle in 1937 with the abstract painter Ben Nicholson. Curves replaced angles in Gabo’s new spatial constructions made of taut wire and plastic thread. He moved to the United States in 1946, and in 1953–54 he taught at the Harvard Graduate School of Architecture. During the 1950s Gabo received several commissions for public sculptures, only some of which he completed, such as the large commemorative monument for the Bijenkorf department store (1954, unveiled in 1957) in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

From Encyclopædia Britannica

http://www.all-art.org/Architecture/24-2.htm

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 111. Marina De Caro

Born in 1961 in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Body, behavior and space; intuition, sensitivity, and perception; experience and knowledge: these are the keywords of Marina De Caro’s work. De Caro develops her poetics from the field of drawing towards the realms of sculpture and performance. Her spatial and action-based works often incorporate soft wearable sculptures especially designed to invite the viewer/performer to experience an unpredictable regard on the every day, on bodily and social behavior and norms. In her drawings and experiences, De Caro disrupts the given, abruptly. A most refined and irreverent master in the use of color, her works also unfold as delicately poetic spatial entities that usually envelop the viewer in a particular novel ambiance and experience.

Copyright @ Marina de Caro

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 110. LIONEL SMIT.

Today I went through the exhibition of Emerging and Established Artist Lionel Smit at the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami Beach.

Lionel Smit was born in Pretoria, South Africa in 1982. He creates monumental portraiture works on canvas, sculpture, silkscreen, video and public installations. Smit’s work has been exhibited locally and internationally in prestigious galleries, art fairs, and public spaces. These include a solo exhibition at the Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki and various public sculptures of his being featured in the USA including Union Square, New York City.

Smit’s painting, Kholiswa, received the Viewer’s Choice Award as part of the BP Portrait Award 2013 at the National Portrait Gallery in London. He has been a featured artist at the Miami Art Fair 2014 and on the cover of Christie’s catalog in London 2009.

Recent exhibitions include Faces of Identity, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in London and Premise, a solo exhibition with Everard Read in Cape Town.

Please, find more information about the artist on https://www.lionelsmit.co.za/about

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2017 Art Basel

Did you miss the 2017 Art Basel in June? Here is a great reason to spend 6 mins in a tour de force through the Galleries sector.

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 103. PAOLO ICARO

Paolo Icaro Chissotti was born in Turin in 1936.

In 1958 he began to practice sculpture in the studio of Umberto Mastroianni. In 1960 he moved to Rome, where in 1962 he held his first one-man show at the Galleria Schneider. In 1964 he took part in the III Ceramic Art Biennale of Gubbio, obtaining the Ministry for Foreign Trade award. In 1965 he was invited to the IX Quadriennale of Rome. In 1966 he moved to New York, where he lived until 1968. In America, he created the Forme di Spazio (Forms of space, 1967), immediately afterward renamed Gabbie (Cages), metal structures where instead of occupying the space the sculpture becomes the place, the origin of that space.

Some of the most significant one-man shows of the last few years are: Modalità, Lorenzelli Arte, Milano (2006-2007); Faredisfarerifarevedere, curated by Mario Bertoni, Centro d’Arte e Cultura Chiesa di San Paolo, Modena (2008); Le pietre di marmo, a homage exhibition within the XXVth Sculpture Biennale of Gubbio, curated by Giorgio Bonomi (2008); Biografia ideale, curated by Ludovico Pratesi, Centro Arti Visive Pescheria, Pesaro (2009); 15 Stele 15, curated by Lara Conte, Parma, Galleria Niccoli (2010). He has also taken part in numerous collective exhibitions, including Time & Place: Milano – Torino. 1958-1968, curated by Luca Massimo Barbero (2008; itinerant) and Italics. Arte italiana fra tradizione e rivoluzione 1968-2008, curated by Francesco Bonami (2008-2009). In 2010 he was presented by Massimo Minini in the section Back to the future of Artissima. In 2011 he showed Cardo e Decumano (2010) at Bologna, in the place of Palazzo d’Accursio, in occasion of Art First. The following personal shows were organized in these last years: Modalità, Lorenzelli Arte, Milan (2006-2007); Faredisfarerifarevedere, by Mario Bertoni, Centro d’Arte and Cultura Chiesa di San Paolo, Modena (2008); Le pietre di marmo, show in hommage to the XXV Biennale di Scultura di Gubbio, by Giorgio Bonomi (2008); Biografia ideale, by Ludovico Pratesi, Centro Arti Visive Pescheria, Pesaro (2009); 15 Stele 15, by Lara Conte, Galleria Niccoli, Parma (2010); Su misura, by Lara Conte and Mauro Panzera, Galleria Il Ponte, Florence (2011); I do as I did, Lorenzelli Arte, Milan (2011). He lives and works in Tavullia, Pesaro.

Paolo Icaro “Pile Up, 22” – Studio la Città, Verona 2013

Paolo Icaro conversazione con Marco Meneguzzo – Studio La Città, Verona 2013

Original: “Eccedenza 90°” by Paolo Icaro on Artsy https://www.artsy.net/artwork/paolo-icaro-eccedenza-90-degrees
http://www.lorenzelliarte.com/en/exhibitions/paolo-icaro-09-11
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