Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 135. NINA RODER

Nina Röder

born in 1983 in Germany and graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from Bauhaus University Weimar with the focus on staged photography. Next, to her artistic activities, she is a Ph.D. candidate with the research topic about performative strategies in contemporary photography.

Nina’s photographic work is exposing hidden structures of biographical stories in which she is combining aspects of the theatre, performance, and stage with the time-based image space of photography. Her photographs have been shown in international exhibitions and photo festivals such as Voicees Off Festival in Arles, the European Month of Photography in Berlin or the Goa Photo Festival in India.

Nina lives and works in Berlin.

grandma's_furkitchennachtkittel

Title of the photography series  by Artist:

WENN DU GEHEN MUST WILLS DU DOCH AUCH BLEIBEN

My grandparents Franz & Theresia Protschka have been expelled after the Second World war from Bohemia and lost everything they had. Therefore it was almost impossible for them to throw anything away when they built up a new life in Germany.

They were both around 90 years old when they died last year. Unfortunately, we had to sell the house both have lived in for more than 60 years. This house in the Franconian province in Germany had been the center for our family.

These pictures were taken in this house when my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and me had to clear and clean the house before we sold it. So the photographs had been realized during the decision process of keeping or giving away all the objects.

One way not being too sad about losing this house with all the memories in it, was to do absurd things in the photographs.

In these pictures, you can see my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and my brother Heiko wearing old clothes of our grandparents.

The title is a quote of my 9-year-old nephew Luis.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 134. SIMONE LEIGH

SIMONE LEIGH

(b. 1967, Chicago)

lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo presentations of Leigh’s work have been hosted by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Studio Museum in Harlem (Marcus Garvey Park), New York; New Museum, New York (all 2016); Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Creative Time, New York (both 2014); and The Kitchen, New York (2012). The artist’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including the Berlin Biennial (2018); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, New Museum, New York (2017); Unconventional Clay: Engaged in Change, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Mo.; Greater New York, MoMA PS1, Long Island City (both 2016); The Dakar Biennial (2014); Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (traveled to Grey Art Gallery, New York; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco [2012–15]); The Whitney Biennial, New York (2012); 30 Seconds off an Inch, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2009); The Future As Disruption, The Kitchen, New York (2008); and Intersections: Defensive Mechanisms, Abrons Art Center, New York (2008). Her work has been recognized with awards and honors from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York (2018); Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2017); A Blade of Grass, New York (2016); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, New York (both 2016); Creative Capital, New York (2012); and the Joan Mitchell Foundation (2011).

https://www.simoneleigh.com/

On image: Exhibition | Simone Leigh: Haunting Race and Gender at Jack Tilton, New York

What’s Her Face Series, “Beaded Head”. 2012. Simone Leigh. Sculpture.

On image: Simone Leigh’s impactful show of new work at the Hammer Museum.

 

***All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 133. Danielle Cohen

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

I am trying to test the body and fuzziness as they appear in my private life, I deal with gender, pain, relationship or entity.
I Especially enjoyed testing the limits of suffering, the border between Erotica pornography and documentary as well as the line between the
personal and intimate private and public spheres. I test my conflict with myself many times in feminine and seductive that is far away from my own self-image and gender when I ascribe to a new image that I create diverse deflections that are associated with such dissemblance.

I disguise myself a lot, but always in order to reveal, sometimes up to the  stem cells and nerves, and the friction with the viewer is
somewhere between pleasure and pain, exciting and delightful.
My occupation with boundaries is almost obsessive , I can say decisively that there is an interface between art and my personal life, and I can hardly separate the two. I place myself in situations that are discomforting to me  and even threaten me, and the discomfort I feel brings out of me something that I feel  Satisfied with.

Images from collection: FASHION & FINE ART

Find more on https://www.daniellecohendinar.com/

Copyright © Danielle Cohen Dinar

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 131. JOHN BROOKS

His work is playful, creepy, energising and anthropomorphic. Stare at these fuzzy wonders long enough and you would swear you saw a heart beat or a leg twitch. This small body of work packs a lot of punch both visually and conceptually. The work stands as a kind of strange timeline not just from one year of fashion to the next but a sort of endless amount of time in between.Brooks fuses weaving techniques into his textile based art pieces bridging that invisible gap between craft and conceptual art.

Please, find more information http://www.johnbrooks.com.au/new-page/

Copyright @ John Brooks

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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