SUBMIT for ART CATALOG 2020

ART COLLECTORS ARE ON THE WAY TO MEET YOUR ART!

I hope you have a pleasant day, dear Artists!

Please, submit your Artwork to be published in our Collectors Choice Catalog 2020. Printed catalog only to present your work to potential art collectors. We will not send it to Artists. We will respond only if your work approved by the team for publication. 

Submission is free

Deadline: March 31, 2020

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How to be SUBMITED:

Everything has to be included in one letter
Name your email letter: Submission _Artistname_Catalog2020

Your name

Your website and Social media links

Your artist statement and BIO text

Your artworks, 3-6 high-resolution images in 300 dpi, Format: JPEG, PNG

The caption and non -gallery price to each Image

Must include: Names of the Galleries you are working and Exclusives you have. 

We accept:
Sculptures, Public ART
New Contemporary Photography, Paintings, Mix media, Installations (produced after the 2000 year)
Minimalism
Multimedia art, Generative, and Digital Art, including Code art.
**This is an image-oriented content and so we ask you for a short text about 90 -110 words. We recommend providing your artist statement and manifest.
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Not all submitted art is guaranteed to be presented.
Unfortunately, due to the number of submissions we receive, it’s just not possible to reply to everyone. Thank you for your kind understanding!

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If your work is approved for the promotion or Publication* you agreed:
**When you submit your artwork you agreed:*
I want my art to be published in Art Curator Online social media content and any Publications • I understand that I am responsible for the quality of my images. • I understand that Publication will be available online• I understand that no print copies are included in this fee. • I understand that my images or text may appear on the Art Curator Online website and other internet pages to promote the Catalog • I keep 100% ownership of my artwork and copyright of my images. Still, I allow Art Curator Online to edit and/or publish my images and text for the next issue • I understand that not all of my uploaded images will be published. I understand that one image will be posted if I select one image. I understand that the two images will be published if I select two images. I understand that the three to five images will be published if I select that option.• I understand that the online content will contain a variety of other visual artists as chosen by Art Curator Online• I understand that the participation fee is not refundable • I confirm that I am the original artist of the artwork I have submitted as mine.
***All rights to published artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from on request at any time. Please, contact us by email.

3 Recommendations to Emerging Artists

Through my routine work days, I see a lot of frustration around. Every day I am receiving messages from artists with only one request: please, help me sell my art.

I could outline some practical steps for people to succeed in selling, but let’s be realistic: there is no right answer, one person’s strategy can be useless for another. Let’s focus on three general recommendation that should and will work today for emerging artists.

First of all, I am going to recommend all artists to become more independent and to find a job to earn a living, maybe outside of the art world. Dear Millennials, you need to stop waiting and dreaming, everything is much more challenging than you expect. Look to the real economy, do research: how many galleries closed in your town for the last two years? How many Art Institutes are closed around the world? You will see that we are experiencing a downturn in the middle- and a lower-priced art market. It is better to understand that real collectors are not investors, they buy art for personal satisfaction and enjoyment. Collectors have appreciated your talent, but they will not donate to your talent at list, there are no other conditions.

Second, be more precise in the way you’re expressing your ideas in art. Your masterpieces need to be academically creative and clearly, reflect your idea if you want it to be marketable today. Now is not the best time for “multi-meaning”, non-sellable or non-affordable emerging art. Art is not just about the talent of the artist. It is a whole science, including sales skills, self-representation and a deep understanding of psychology. Make sure your subject is sharp.

Finally, my third recommendation, start to learn how to support your art by yourself. Develop your Instagram, use it to display your environment and background to your benefit. Be intelligent and more transparent on social media: art curators and collectors are checking your backgrounds each day. Continue to pursue your passions, revolutionize the process of making art, explore science and technologies, learn the basics of art marketing.

Dear artists, the art industry has run into some changes, and it is not your fault. The economy wheel is spinning around, and soon we will see a new cycle and a more supportive art market. I am sure that professionals in the art industry will find the best solutions for you, and we all continue working in the new settings.

My best wishes,

Masha

What to collect #142. GISELA COLON

GISELA COLON (Canada, b. 1966) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Colon is an American contemporary artist who has developed a unique vocabulary of “organic minimalism,” breathing life-like qualities into reductive forms. Colon’s oeuvre encompasses several distinct sculptural forms: Pods, Slabs, Monoliths, and Portals. The through-line in all of Colon’s work is the concept of the “mutable object;” the sculptures are conceived as variable objects that transmute their physical qualities through fluctuating movement, varied lighting, changing environmental conditions, and the passage of time.

The Pods are created through a proprietary fabrication method of blow-molding and layering various acrylic materials, producing transformational objects that emanate light and color from within. 

Biography and images via https://www.giselacolon.com/

Copyright © GISELA COLON

* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request by email@artcuratoronline.com

Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Link to share: Myths that stop people from buying art https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

WHAT TO COLLECT # 135. NINA RODER

Nina Röder

born in 1983 in Germany and graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from Bauhaus University Weimar with the focus on staged photography. Next, to her artistic activities, she is a Ph.D. candidate with the research topic about performative strategies in contemporary photography.

Nina’s photographic work is exposing hidden structures of biographical stories in which she is combining aspects of the theatre, performance, and stage with the time-based image space of photography. Her photographs have been shown in international exhibitions and photo festivals such as Voicees Off Festival in Arles, the European Month of Photography in Berlin or the Goa Photo Festival in India.

Nina lives and works in Berlin.

grandma's_furkitchennachtkittel

Title of the photography series  by Artist:

WENN DU GEHEN MUST WILLS DU DOCH AUCH BLEIBEN

My grandparents Franz & Theresia Protschka have been expelled after the Second World war from Bohemia and lost everything they had. Therefore it was almost impossible for them to throw anything away when they built up a new life in Germany.

They were both around 90 years old when they died last year. Unfortunately, we had to sell the house both have lived in for more than 60 years. This house in the Franconian province in Germany had been the center for our family.

These pictures were taken in this house when my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and me had to clear and clean the house before we sold it. So the photographs had been realized during the decision process of keeping or giving away all the objects.

One way not being too sad about losing this house with all the memories in it, was to do absurd things in the photographs.

In these pictures, you can see my mother Dagmar, my cousin Laura and my brother Heiko wearing old clothes of our grandparents.

The title is a quote of my 9-year-old nephew Luis.

How Much Is Your Object Worth? – Researching Your Art

Reposted from https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

It is hard to establish fixed values for antiques, artworks, and other collectible items. The amount asked or offered is determined by many factors, including the condition of the object, personal interests of both the seller and the purchaser, and trends in the market. According to Smithsonian Institution policy, no staff member may offer monetary evaluations. However, the following guidelines should help you find an approximate value for your artwork.

First, consult price guides to determine current sale and auction prices. Some price guides are available on the Internet, but most come in books or offline formats. Specialized university or art museum libraries and larger public libraries often carry these guides. Price indexes are usually published annually and cover international auctions and galleries.

PRICE GUIDES

ADEC: International Art Prices
Art Sales Index
Davenport’s Art Reference & Price Guide
International Auction Records
Leonard’s Annual Price Index of Art Auctions

For prints, check the following resources:

Gordon’s Print Price Annual
Contemporary Print Portfolio
Lawrence’s Dealer Print Prices International

ONLINE PRICING RESOURCES

invaluable.com

artprice.com

artnet.com

AskArt.com

FindArtinfo.com

MutualArt.com

APPRAISALS & APPRAISERS

Consider finding an appraiser to determine the value of your artwork. Appraisers are trained specialists who work for a fee. They evaluate your piece and give you a written statement of its value. Although the following organizations do not provide appraisals themselves, they each publish a directory of their members. Always seek an appraiser with an expertise in the type of artwork you own.

American Society of Appraisers
11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 310
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 478-2228 or 1-800-ASA-VALU
www.appraisers.org

Appraisers Association of America
212 West 35th Street, 11th Floor South
New York, NY 10001
(212) 889-5404
www.appraisersassoc.org

International Society of Appraisers
303 West Madison Street, Suite 2650
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 981-6778
www.isa-appraisers.org

AUCTION HOUSES

Some auction houses host free “open house” days where visitors can bring in their artworks and have auction-house staff members share their expertise. Other houses allow owners to mail their information with a photograph, and their experts will respond. To find an auction house in your area, search online for “fine art auction houses.”

Originally published on https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

WHAT TO COLLECT # 134. SIMONE LEIGH

SIMONE LEIGH

(b. 1967, Chicago)

lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo presentations of Leigh’s work have been hosted by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Studio Museum in Harlem (Marcus Garvey Park), New York; New Museum, New York (all 2016); Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Creative Time, New York (both 2014); and The Kitchen, New York (2012). The artist’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including the Berlin Biennial (2018); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, New Museum, New York (2017); Unconventional Clay: Engaged in Change, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Mo.; Greater New York, MoMA PS1, Long Island City (both 2016); The Dakar Biennial (2014); Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (traveled to Grey Art Gallery, New York; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco [2012–15]); The Whitney Biennial, New York (2012); 30 Seconds off an Inch, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2009); The Future As Disruption, The Kitchen, New York (2008); and Intersections: Defensive Mechanisms, Abrons Art Center, New York (2008). Her work has been recognized with awards and honors from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York (2018); Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2017); A Blade of Grass, New York (2016); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, New York (both 2016); Creative Capital, New York (2012); and the Joan Mitchell Foundation (2011).

https://www.simoneleigh.com/

On image: Exhibition | Simone Leigh: Haunting Race and Gender at Jack Tilton, New York

What’s Her Face Series, “Beaded Head”. 2012. Simone Leigh. Sculpture.

On image: Simone Leigh’s impactful show of new work at the Hammer Museum.

 

***All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.