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WHAT TO COLLECT #124. Pablo Thecuadro

Born in 1992. From Zaragoza but he lives and works in Madrid. There’s only one thing he loves the most: to create images.

Essential but powerful collages, in which Pablo Thecuadro mixes different techniques: from the cut by hand to digital techniques.

Pablo Thecuadro collages go beyond the simply combination of beautiful images; they include the concept of duality in the human being.

His work is a deep, elegant and abstract exploration that brings back to reality, to the human essence.

Copyright @ by Pablo Thecuadro

Read the interview with Artist on https://www.thefashionatlas.com/en/atlas_en/photography_en/the-abstract-collages-by-spanish-artist-pablo-thecuadro.php#prettyPhoto

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #122. JOAN JONAS

Born in 1936 in New York, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video art, and a titan of the American avant-garde.

She is known for blending performance and film in exciting and challenging ways. She rose to artistic fame in the late 1960s for her compelling Mirror Pieces, which featured performers carrying mirrors on stage and slowly, deliberately rotating them, transforming the audience into an image on glass.

Please, watch YouTube movie:

https://youtu.be/rzp6Ehnxq34

#art #installation #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 121. ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol

American, 1928–1987

Inspired by the portraits that Man Ray photographed of Marcel Duchamp’s alter ego, Rrose Sélavy, Andy Warhol created a series of drag self-portraits. Always questioning the conventions of constructed identity, Warhol donned a wig and bold makeup, subverting traditional gender expectations and paying homage to the artists before him.

Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981

Gelatin silver print

Image: 3.5 x 2.25 in. (8.89 x 5.72 cm.)

Sheet: 4.25 x 3.4 in. (10.8 x 8.64 cm.)

American Pop Art icon Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was known for taking photographic portraits of his many friends in and outside of the art world. The photographic medium was critical to Warhol’s artistic production, and he brought his camera with him wherever he went. His photographic oeuvre reads like today’s ubiquitous social media photo streams and provides a fascinating look into the life of an enigmatic figure whose influence on the art world, and society as a whole, is unparalleled. Playing with the notions of identity, perception, and one’s public versus private self, Warhol also took many poignant self-portraits, often in drag, as seen here.

Originally it was published on

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/andy-warhol/self-portrait-in-drag-8

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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HOW TO BE INSPIRED BY OTHER ARTISTS WITHOUT COPYING THEM

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 5: composition

Apr 17, 2017 | Inspiration

This is the fifth and final post in the series, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 Each week we’ll look at a single aspect of painting and how…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 4: perspective

Apr 10, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the fourth in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at viewpoints, or perspective. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 3: subject matter

Apr 3, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the third in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at subject matter. Part 1 | Part 2 Each week…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 2: colour palettes

Mar 27, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the second in a series of five, in which we’re exploring ways to be inspired by the artists whose work you love, while keeping you focused on developing your own art. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at colour palettes. Part 1 Each…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them: Part 1

Mar 13, 2017 | Inspiration

Something a bit different this week! This post is the first in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. {Which might be handy as we’re all being inspired all the…

a gallery of abstractified art : a selection of works by Abstractify students

Feb 27, 2017 | Inspiration

Last year I put together a virtual exhibition of work from previous Abstractify students to share with you. It was such a great way to showcase their beautiful creations and the possibilities the course offers, I decided to do another this year! As before, I’ve…

This series of articles was originally published on http://taraleaver.com/category/inspiration-2/

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 18. SONDRA PERRY

Sondra Perry is an American artist who was born in 1986. Sondra Perry has had numerous gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. There have been numerous articles about Sondra Perry, including ‘Sondra Perry’s Typhoon wrenches my soul but Ian Cheng’s AI is merely soulless – review’ written by Jonathan Jones for The Guardian in 2018.

Masks and Global African Art, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, 2015; A Curious Blindness, Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, New York (2015); Of Present Bodies, Arlington Arts Center, Arlington VA (2014); and Young, Gifted, & Black: Transforming Visual Media, The Camera Club of New York (2012). Perry performed Sondra Perry & Associate Make Pancakes and Shame the Devil at the Artist’s Institute, New York, in 2015. The artist’s work has been screened at venues such as Les Voutes, Paris, France; Light Industry, New York; Video Art and Experimental Film Festival, Tribeca Cinemas, New York; Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts Museum, Shenyang China; and LOOP Barcelona Media Arts Festival. Perry was a panelist at Black Artists on Social Media at the Brooklyn Museum, NY. In 2014 Perry was Guest Lecturer at the School of Visual Arts, New York, for the course History, Theory, and Practice of the Image. Perry has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Vermont Studio Center, Ox-bow, and the Experimental Television Center. Perry is currently based in Houston, Texas as part of the artist-in-residence program CORE at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Articles

https://frieze.com/article/we-might-not-need-another-hero-do-we-need-another-fair-middling-biennial

https://www.mutualart.com/Artist/Sondra-Perry/A53ED27C8C149F1C/Articles

http://www.mutualart.com/ExternalArticle/Sondra-Perry-Wins-Seattle-Art-Museums-20/EDDF97EB7293BC0B

Credit Photo illustration by Adam Ferriss. Source photograph by Jean-Erick Pasquier/Gamma-Rapho, via Getty Images.
Sondra Perry’s ‘TK (Suspicious Glorious Absence)’ at the Serpentine Gallery CREDIT: HEATHCLIFF O’MALLEY
Credit Photo illustration by Adam Ferriss. Source photograph by View Pictures/UIG, via Getty Images.
Sondra Perry, “Graft and Ash for a Three Monitor Workstation” (still, 2016, courtesy of the artist)
Installation view of Typhoon Coming On (© 2018 Mike Din, photo courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery)

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Visit to Basel 2018

Art, it is a good way to entertain when you have dinner with friends in your house – just like talking about expensive wine or travels you now can talk about your existing art experience. Art is always about stature.

With Art Significator You will be proud of your art collection.

Masha Melnik

From Art Basel, Switzerland

2018

Photo credit by Masha Melnik

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #116. AVERY SINGER

“I feel incredibly free when I have an art idea.

Being an artist is almost like, a pursuit of this feeling of freedom. I love that feeling.

I live for that.” – Avery Singer

Avery Singer was born in 1987 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Painting almost exclusively in tones of black and white, Singer’s canvases teeter between abstraction and figuration.

Employing the 3D-modeling software, Google SketchUp, to create an under-drawing, Singer applies acrylic paint to the canvas via an airbrush, creating images that are both digital and analog. The artist’s conceptual considerations are bolstered by her deep sense of art history, to which the titles of her works occasionally make references. In her juxtaposition of unexpected props that appear part human and part cyborg, Singer finds her inimitable signature style.

Original article: https://art21.org/artist/avery-singer/

Copyright by Avery Singer

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #115. ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

Born 1969 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. She lives and works in Berlin and Almaty.

Artist Statement

“My educational background is in the Soviet Russian, avant-garde school of Futurism, which I combine with the nomadic aesthetic of post-Soviet, contemporary Kazakhstan that I have been exploring in recent years through photographic and video work.

I use specific modes of expression in modern and contemporary art as a vehicle to investigate my personal archaic atavism as a certain mystical anthropomorphism. In other words, I explore the nature of a specific Egregore, a shared cultural psychic experience, which manifests itself as a specific form of thought among the people(s) of the ancient, arid and dusty Steppes between the Caspian Sea, Baikonur and Altai in today’s Kazakhstan.

In the Russian language, Archaic Atavism is personalised as a being — which points to and creates a different meaning. We are not just speaking about an idea or archaic element in the collective subconscious of a people, but about the embodiment of our archaic atavism, which becomes an active entity, just like a creature itself. Our archaic atavism is not just internalised, but also externalised. It is as if It, like a being, has been awakened by the post-Soviet experience of the indigenous Kazakh people, who are becoming their own after 80 years of Soviet domination and cultural genocide. Suddenly, It (Archaic Atavism) became interested in enculturation and in modern behaviours. It also began to have entertaining dialogues with the trans-national circulation of ideas in contemporary art.

For this dialogue, I have chosen the medium of video and photography, and like to work with the notion of memory and reality. My archaic atavism is interested in my video explorations in the Steppes and in post-Soviet Asia. By editing raw data and combining documentary and staged footage, I become Its voice, enabling a cultural exodus from long oblivion. My work raises metaphysical questions such as Who am I? and Where shall I go?; this (psychic) experience and perspective marks my artistic language.”

Almagul Menlibayeva’s recent notable exhibitions include a solo show at the Grand Palais in Paris (2016) and group shows Elective Affinities at the NCCA in Moscow (2015), BALAGAN!!! in Berlin (2015), Moscow Biennale (2015, 2011), The Union of Fire and Water at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), 18th Sydney Biennale (2012), 1st Kyiv Biennale (2012), 10th Sharjah Biennale (2011) and Unconditional Love at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009).

Please, find more information about Artist here

Watch “LOUIS VUITTON – ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/52163759?ref=em-share

Copyright by ALMAGUL MENLIBAYEVA

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector by Sylvain Levy.

Building art collections has always been a diverse and a personal adventure. Today we can add a new profile to the different types of collectors: the entrepreneurial collector.

Original article: 6 Rules for the Entrepreneurial Collector https://blog.vastari.com/the-entrepreneurial-collector-sylvain-levy-dsl/

All the fields of our society are impacted by individuals who has invested in changing history, not just making money. Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Jeff Bezos are among these entrepreneurs focused on change.

How can art collectors be inspired by Elon Musk’s disruptive thinking? Below, I’ll share 6 points that should always be considered by the entrepreneurial collector.

1. A collection needs a vision

Any entrepreneur wishing to make it big must first put everything into their vision. They must believe in the project before anyone else does. They must love the brand before anyone else starts to. In the words of Nobel Laurate Dennis Gabor, “The future cannot be predicted, but futures can be invented.”

As for us [at DSL], our vision is to build a timely and timeless collection with a very strong cultural identity. We can only achieve this goal by being clear, authentic and giving a soul to a collection

2. A collection must always be on the move, aiming for the stars with feet on the ground

In a six-year period, Elon Musk accomplished what can be considered a titanic entrepreneurial crusade. He founded SpaceX in 2002 and Tesla Motors in 2003, both companies achieving their first major victories in 2008.

As for a collection it should always greatly challenge its time by the choice of collected works but also by how those works want to impact the audience and the collector..

Dslcollection is constantly surfing on the wave of Chinese contemporary art and the wave of technology. We were among the first ones, to be be present on internet since 2005, to have 2D and 3D museums, a second life museum in 2012 and today a virtual museum.

3. Don’t let failure defeat you

Musk does have several failed attempts to his name. Not every idea that he’s pursued has been an instant success. The first three launches at SpaceX were failures, and the Tesla Roadster took three years to become commercially viable even after the engineering was already foolproof.

It means for a collector to risk failure by constantly challenging the status quo or collecting works out of their comfort zone.

Unfortunately more and more collectors, because of basing their collections on investment criteria, prefer to play it safe

By focussing on China, we [DSL] have deliberately positioned ourselves out of our comfort zone

4. Craziness is an important part of an entrepreneurial culture

Yes, Elon Musk’s ideas are crazy. But so were Steve Jobs’s ideas, Bill Gates’s ideas, Benjamin Franklin’s ideas.

As for us, we built a collection in 2005 which only focussed on Chinese contemporary art – when we live 12.000km from China, we do not speak Chinese and there was not any institution validation.At the time, many would have considered this to be a crazy idea.

We had to think outside of the box and invent new ways to have access to the works (especially by using WeChat to stay informed!)

5. Criticism and self reflection

Elon solicits criticism and seeks out his critics to converse with them. This shows how important self-reflection can be to help one grow.

A collection should always interact with its audience and the art eco -system surrounding it. Sharing through social networks, and being open to feedback is an inspiring way to make a collection always lively and relevant.

Today Dslcollection has more than 31,000 followers on Linkedin with whom a dialogue is established through daily posts

6. A breakthrough innovation, it is rarely one little thing. It’s usually a whole bunch of things that collectively amount to a huge innovation

A collection should live in the context of the world in which it is built. To be innovative is not just about collecting emerging artists. It is also about harmoniously bridging humanities, art and science. That is the sense of the dslcollection project we have built the past 13 years.

Conclusion

Musk’s passionate obsession is an inspiration for anyone wanting to achieve something extraordinary. His focus, discipline and style are powerful antidotes against the mediocrity and complacency that creep up after routine settles in.

If you have a vision to transform a whole industry,if you are one of those who doesn’t like to play it safe, then there is a lot you can learn from Elon Musk, even as an art collector or art industry professional.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #114 . GUDA KOSTER

Guda Koster is a Dutch artist who creates living sculptures and performances, which the photographs are the results of. Koster’s works are created in parallels of time, space, and textile. In her works, Koster uses fabrics, colors, and patterns that underline the codes and meanings our clothing conveys

How would you describe your works? I make installations, sculptures, and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives, we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.

Please, read more about Artist Guda Koster here Videos on YOUTUBE

Copyright by Guda Koster

Indian summer

photo, work

2017, fotoprint, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

Stormy weather

photo, work

2017, 90 x 60 cm or 75 x 50 cm

One leg

photo, work

2017, photoprint

Size: divers

Happy?

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Just married

photo, work

2016, 50×75 cm

Box

sculpture, work

2015, sculpture, karton, textiel, schoenen, paspop, 100 x 150 x 80 cm

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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