WHAT TO COLLECT # 143. Khairullah Rahim

I would like to share with you today, an artwork by emerging Artist Khairullah Rahim. I stopped by the booth at Untitled art fair Miami this year because of captured his wall sculptures. I have been attracted by the pastel color pallet and nonstandard urban materials he used. I love urbanism in art because it helps us to think about our place in the world and look individually at the space where people live and work. I feel that with this type of art we can try to change modern space, make it brighter, creative and more comfortable. KR_Best-Supporting-Actor-2018-115-x-65cm
Khairullah Rahim practice explores stories that are concerned with experiences of oppression and prejudice against communities whose identities do not fit. In response, strategies for surviving and flourishing have emerged as recurring points of discussion and consideration throughout his works. While Rahim’s works may evoke a distinctive joyful demeanor, they loaded with stories of loss and marginalization. Artist blends unconventional, readymade materials to express his creative ideas in art production.
Objects and materials in his sculptures having metaphoric meanings that go deeper than the surface appearance of its particular original landscape. The artworks highlight colorism of specific female duties and shows, that visual perception just a passive observation and has nothing common with the particular cleaning process.
Artist also has a very collection of paintings and been showcased in numerous exhibitions and art fairs abroad, such as in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, Turkey, and the USA.
You can find more of Khairullah Rahim’s works on his Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/khairullahrahim/?hl=en

assemblage-flamingo-2_originstallation-view-1_1_origWe Met, and yes, we had a sex

Images source

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

3 Recommendations to Emerging Artists

Through my routine work days, I see a lot of frustration around. Every day I am receiving messages from artists with only one request: please, help me sell my art.

I could outline some practical steps for people to succeed in selling, but let’s be realistic: there is no right answer, one person’s strategy can be useless for another. Let’s focus on three general recommendation that should and will work today for emerging artists.

First of all, I am going to recommend all artists to become more independent and to find a job to earn a living, maybe outside of the art world. Dear Millennials, you need to stop waiting and dreaming, everything is much more challenging than you expect. Look to the real economy, do research: how many galleries closed in your town for the last two years? How many Art Institutes are closed around the world? You will see that we are experiencing a downturn in the middle- and a lower-priced art market. It is better to understand that real collectors are not investors, they buy art for personal satisfaction and enjoyment. Collectors have appreciated your talent, but they will not donate to your talent at list, there are no other conditions.

Second, be more precise in the way you’re expressing your ideas in art. Your masterpieces need to be academically creative and clearly, reflect your idea if you want it to be marketable today. Now is not the best time for “multi-meaning”, non-sellable or non-affordable emerging art. Art is not just about the talent of the artist. It is a whole science, including sales skills, self-representation and a deep understanding of psychology. Make sure your subject is sharp.

Finally, my third recommendation, start to learn how to support your art by yourself. Develop your Instagram, use it to display your environment and background to your benefit. Be intelligent and more transparent on social media: art curators and collectors are checking your backgrounds each day. Continue to pursue your passions, revolutionize the process of making art, explore science and technologies, learn the basics of art marketing.

Dear artists, the art industry has run into some changes, and it is not your fault. The economy wheel is spinning around, and soon we will see a new cycle and a more supportive art market. I am sure that professionals in the art industry will find the best solutions for you, and we all continue working in the new settings.

My best wishes,

Masha

WHAT TO COLLECT # 141. Riccardo Mayr

Riccardo Mayr was born and raised in Ferrara (Italy) a small city, which carries in its streets and buildings the marks of a glorious past.

During the sixteenth century, the cities of the province of Italy’s region Emilia-Romagna —although mostly small in population—were vibrant and quite distinctive, artistically and culturally. The three principal centers, Ferrara, Bologna, and Parma, were especially so, and each had a unique trajectory in both politics and the arts. Ferrara was home to one of the most important humanist courts in the Renaissance, which is known as the Este dukes.
Although small in size, Ferrara was a crucible of Renaissance thought and art. Throughout the fifteenth century, its rulers, the Este family, commissioned works from the greatest contemporary painters, including Giovanni Bellini, Fra Bartolommeo, Raphael, Titian, and Dosso Dossi.

Riccardo grew up in an early Baroque family palazzo located in the center of the city, which is over 500 years old.  The Palazzo has belonged to the Mayr family for more than 200 years.

This “big building” and courtyard garden is like a real time capsule hosting paintings covering a 500 year period collected by Riccardo’s ancestors.  The objects of art, pieces of ancient furniture and family memorabilia ranging from the XVI to the XX Century are a tangible testimony of ancient times, peoples and events.  Living in the Palazzo, surrounded by such tangible testimony of ancient times, he grew up deeply affected by the sense of the passing of time, by century’s old accumulation of dust, by the colors and smells of time.

In the late nineties, while completing his studies as an architect at the University of Ferrara, a couple of casual events marked his sudden and crucial interest in contemporary art. First, in the Palazzo, he would watch his mother learn the technique of oil painting from a Ferrara artist and painter, Emanuele Taglietti collaborator of Riccardo for this project, who himself seemed as if he would visit the palazzo from a past era. 

The second casual event was the visit of the Venice Biennale of 1997 and the casual encounter with the work of such artists as Anselm Kiefer and Christian Boltanski.

From that moment on, Riccardo was not just an architect but also a self-taught painter.

During the nineties to learn how to paint Riccardo started to use unusual materials such as rust, charcoal, ash, lead, iron and mirror debris, materials of his home surroundings. This then brought him to paint with continuity and starting exhibit in Italy and abroad.

Recently, Riccardo’s mother who had been the stoic and ever-present matriarch of the Mayr family and palazzo died of cancer.  The passing of his mother, as well as his father many years prior, required that Riccardo and his sister manage the affairs of the Mayr estate including the collection of paintings put together by their ancestors during the last 200 years. Riccardo was overwhelmed with the daunting task of managing the Mayr estate and deciding the future of the Mayr family.  Riccardo would pace through the palazzo with its big, dark, and treasure-filled rooms, pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family.

Riccardo asked himself if he had to accept passively the relentless passing of time and the succession of the generations. He would ponder if there were anyway, any scenario whereby he could jam this pitiless biological mechanism, even just for a moment.  He would turn his sight to the walls around him, rows of ancient paintings, the testimony of an unquestionable pastime, events, landscapes, and mute portraits of ancestors would stare back at him.  He began thinking about the sense of sacrifice inherent in the religious paintings of the family collection, which is similar to any parent’s sacrifice on behalf children; religious themes, ancient beliefs and offerings for relief.

At one point, Riccardo reminisced about his childhood, running through the sequence of Baroque rooms of the palazzo playing for what seemed like endless games of hide and seek, impersonating characters of the first Star Wars movies, of good versus evil, the bad and the good chasing each other with cardboard light sabers. He thought about his son, now 11 years old who has become his own Star Wars enthusiast, playing like Riccardo would in the same palazzo 35 years earlier in what seems to be the atemporal playground of the Mayr family house and garden.

It was at that point or moment of torment and mourning of his mother, that period of contemplation pondering the meaning and responsibility of being not just a husband and a father but also a descendant of the Mayr family, that Riccrado connected the dots between his past and present, between centuries old visual art traditions of Ferrara and the cinematic culture we are embedded with cross-culturally today. Riccardo realized there are links between the religious art of the family paintings and the commercial art of the Star Wars saga; both addressing the meaning of sacrifice on behalf of others, redemption and the human need for repentance.

This is the genesis of what is unveiled in this painting project, titled “Religious paintings of the expanded galaxy”  Riccardo commissioned the Ferrara painter who traveled from another era to teach his mother painting techniques and together they created a new technique which integrates into original paintings from the 17th and 18th Century fictitious elements and characters taken from the popular culture of our times, the Star Wars saga. In so doing, the project represents religious faith and ethics in what it is yet a post-modern paradigm largely embedded in fictional reality through an already generational long exposure and fascination with successful science fiction movies.  We also give back to figurative oil paintings a new path to a concept of truth. 

Mayr_Manchildstarwars

*All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 140. DeSoto

THE ARTIST

A creative mind since birth, Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto) has had an extensive journey in the arts. He began to sing at age eighteen and later on compose music in his early twenties. Spending over thirty years in the music industry, Pepe always had a passion for the visual arts. He immersed himself in the world of photography shortly after retiring from music. Over the years, his passion for photography combined with his natural talent in digital art led to the creation and evolution of his signature style known as Fragmented Reality. 

Fragmented Reality is a reflection of human nature. Each subject is divided, broken down into a profusion of feelings. Like a puzzle, an answer lies behind each piece. An unfinished masterpiece yearning for completion.

From this foundation, DeSoto began to create a series of experiments in search of new textures that broke away from traditional color palettes. His newest collection known as Translucent Dimension is a result of a year’s worth of what he calls “artistic discovery.” DeSoto not only discovered new textures but utilized light to create something indescribably beautiful.

The Mother of Pearl effect which he achieved with many of the pieces in Translucent Dimension draws in the viewer and captures them with its abyss of layers. The collection’s ability to give off a luxurious feel adds a touch of class that separates it from traditional art.

“I knew that Fragmented Reality was only the beginning of my work and not the end. The true beauty of art lies in that it is as infinite as the human mind”

— Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto)

OVERBOARD DIVAS.E.L.F.SUN BATHING
* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 139

The DUSKMANN collective formed in 2015, a union of visionary minds with a clear artistic direction and above all, a desire for continual creative experimentation. DUSKMANN’s goal is to gather complex forms of expression within a single universe, enhancing the peculiarities that distinguish them. They work in a range of fields, thus creating an ecosystem with a great deal of creative biodiversity and releasing powerful, expressive energy in a single soul on the Renaissance model.

About Artist

PRELUDE was born during a trip to Sicily. The artists were entranced by the beauty of Sicilian marbles and the figures evoked by their veining. With their characteristically minimal, post-atomic approach, somewhere between pure art and a careful study of form, they photographed them, framed them and installed them, paying careful attention to their geometries. When they came across a large jasper, sculpted by nature itself into the shape of a heart, they smoothed it down and made it the centerpiece of their work. This jasper is the beating heart, the focal point, from which the perspective on the surrounding pieces begins. The Prelude series consists of 41 black and 41 white pieces. These are photographs selected from over 2,000 taken of marbles as part of the project’s obsessive preparation. On the back of every piece is an octagonal fragment of jasper which makes them unique and reconnects them to the great central heart like the consequence of some metaphorical explosion. A continuous dichotomy, the power of opposites and the synthesis of contemporary complexities are DUSKMANN’s lifeblood and, not coincidentally, give the collection its name: a twilight soul capable of negotiating the contradictions of its time.

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*All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 138. Pao-Leng Kung

Art Description by Artist Pao Leng Kung

In my works, I magnify some elements during the working process: the erasure of color, the relationship between positive and negative spaces, and the space inside and outside the canvas.

Typically, I use ‘ white’ as a force to expand unlimited space or as an emptiness to fill all the colors by imagination. Also ‘ white’ could refer to the white of exhibition space, gesso, and the natural canvas. Because of this, it opens far more possibilities to transfer the undefined space inside and outside of my paintings.

For the other colors and stripes, they serve as multiple roles within complicatedly interactive layers and transition between positive/ negative spaces. They are the main body that constructs the base for the whole picture, while they are too supporting roles that step by step builds up the existence of negative space.

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Copyright@Pao Leng Kung

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from the on request at any time.

Why Love Generative Art? Article by Jason Bailey

Over the last 50 years, our world has turned digital at breakneck speed. No art form has captured this transitional time period – our time period – better than generative art. Generative art takes full advantage of everything that computing has to offer, producing elegant and compelling artworks that extend the same principles and goals artists have pursued from the inception of modern art.

Geometry, abstraction, and chance are important themes not just for generative art, but for all art of 20th Century. As an art historian and an amateur generative artist, I see a clear line of influence on generative art starting from Cézanne and shooting straight through to the:

  • Fracturing of geometry in Analytical Cubism

  • Emphasis on technology, machine aesthetic, and mechanized production from Futurism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus

  • Introduction of autonomy and chance in Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism

  • Anti-figurative aesthetic, bold geometry, and intense color of Neoplasticism, Suprematism, Hard-edged Abstraction, and OpArt

  • Use of algorithms by Sol Lewitt and others

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_501″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 510.78125px”>  Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth  - Hilma af Klint, 1907

Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_523″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 475px”>  Suprematist Composition -  Kasimir Malevich, 1916

Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_541″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 392.953125px”>  Circles in a Circle  - Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_560″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 400px”>  Highway and Byways  - Paul Klee, 1928

Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_578″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 380px”>  Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)  - Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_597″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 410.203125px”>  Concentric Squares  - Josef Albers, 1941

Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941