Myths that stop people from buying art by Goda Smilingyte

I have decided to break some myths today. I realised, that very often people do not have any art at home just because they are not confident enough about buying art. The art market has been always surrounded by mysteries, stereotypes and myths, but it is not as complicated as it seems. I believe everyone deserves living in beautiful and inspiring environment. So let’s begin the myth breaking!

1. Art is for rich people

Rich people can afford very expensive artworks created by famous artists. Yes, their budgets empower them to buy most expensive paintings at prestigious art fairs or place high bids at the auctions, but that does not mean that only people with very high income have the privilege to surround themselves with art. I think this myth is quite strong because every time someone acquires the work created by Warhol, Hirst, Basquiat or other celebrity, it hits the headlines. However, there are a lot of good artists who’s names are not in the media all the time and they still create very powerful pieces. I think that artists are driven by the creative process. Of course they need recognition, but they don’t have any assumptions about who should own their art and do not care about the art lover’s income.

2. Only art experts know what good art is

Collecting art as an investment requires the knowledge of art history and market. However, I dare to argue that most people buy art (whatever their level of income is) because they like it. They feel connected with the artwork, they find it interesting, vibrant, maybe even shocking, but they want to own it. They like it for whatever emotion it arises. I like comparing visual arts to music. You hear a song and you either like it or not. The same criteria applies to visual art — if you like it, it is good and it does not matter that someone else hates it. There is no need to be a certified expert to understand what is it you like. We are all different, we have different tastes and so there is plenty of different art for everyone.

3. You must have a certain status to enter an art gallery

I don’t know why entering a gallery always feels a bit uncomfortable. I visit a lot of exhibitions regularly, but I always have this awkward feeling stepping in. I cannot explain where does it come from, the silence, white walls or the absence of people. Whatever the psychological reason is, it should not stop us. People who work at the galleries are usually very nice. They can tell you a lot of interesting facts about the exhibiting artist and will not judge you in any way. The purpose of the gallery is to exhibit art and promote the artists, so the more visitors a gallery has, the happier is the gallery owner!

4. Art requires a lot of space

Yes and no. Large canvas demands a large wall, but smaller canvases also exist. Just as large and small sculptures. Every apartment and every house has walls, shelfs and corners that can be decorated with art. When you start collecting art the result is quite unexpected — the more art you have, the more pleasant is your space!

5. It is difficult to match art with interior

Absolutely not. If you acquire an artwork you like, it will always fit. You will always find the right place for the art that brings joy to your eyes. There are no rules and everyone is free to experiment. It is easy to move the artworks around and change the lightning. We are the creators of our environment and we can do anything we like. The most important criteria is that we are happy with what we see.

Originally published by Goda Smilingyte on https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

Link to share: Myths that stop people from buying art https://www.artgoda.ch/single-post/2017/11/12/5-MYTHS-THAT-STOP-PEOPLE-FROM-BUYING-ART

WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 120. LIZA RAYN

LIza RAYN

born in 1965 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Ryan earned a BFA at Dartmouth College, (New Hampshire) in 1987 and an MFA from California State University, Fullerton in 1994. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Liza works in photography, video and mixed media. Her interest in the use of visual metaphor remains constant throughout her bodies of work.The J. Paul Getty Museum, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, California) are among the public collections holding works by Ryan.

Copyright @ Liza Ryan

http://www.lizaryan.com

#lizarayn #auction #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

WHAT TO COLLECT # 117. ANNETTE KELM

Annette KELM was born 1975 in Stuttgart, Germany. She currently lives and works in Berlin.

Kelm is interested in typologies, models of mass production, the function of objects and the nature of their representation, and stylistic developments in patterned textiles, design, and technology. In her work she conflates several genres in single images or in series on a single motif that combine a variety of artistic, historical, and cross-cultural references. Taken with large- and medium-format analog cameras and individually printed by hand, her carefully composed pictures appear not unlike advertisements. But their sense of precise objectivity is undercut by artifice and strangeness: Kelm turns out baffling narratives, such as that in Untitled (Cardboard, Paisley, Ladder, Hands), in which the typically concealed photographic setup unexpectedly crops up within the picture frame.

MOMA

Copyright @ Annette KELM

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Visit to Basel 2018

Art, it is a good way to entertain when you have dinner with friends in your house – just like talking about expensive wine or travels you now can talk about your existing art experience. Art is always about stature.

With Art Significator You will be proud of your art collection.

Masha Melnik

From Art Basel, Switzerland

2018

Photo credit by Masha Melnik

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 111. Marina De Caro

Born in 1961 in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Body, behavior and space; intuition, sensitivity, and perception; experience and knowledge: these are the keywords of Marina De Caro’s work. De Caro develops her poetics from the field of drawing towards the realms of sculpture and performance. Her spatial and action-based works often incorporate soft wearable sculptures especially designed to invite the viewer/performer to experience an unpredictable regard on the every day, on bodily and social behavior and norms. In her drawings and experiences, De Caro disrupts the given, abruptly. A most refined and irreverent master in the use of color, her works also unfold as delicately poetic spatial entities that usually envelop the viewer in a particular novel ambiance and experience.

Copyright @ Marina de Caro

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Galleries you need to explore during an Art Basel Hong Kong

TANG CONTEMPORARY ART

10/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road

Central, Hong Kong

https://www.tangcontemporary.com/

PARA SITE ART SPACE Set up in 1996 and for many years the city’s only name in contemporary art, Para Site is still a proud voice in Hong Kong’s independent art scene.

• 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building, 677 King’s Road, Quarry Bay

http://www.para-site.org.hk/

GALLERY EXIT

Opened in 2008 to provide an exhibition space for emerging Hong Kong artists, with an emphasis on edgy, conceptual art.

• 3/F, 25 Hing Wo Street, Tin Wan, Hong Kong

http://www.galleryexit.com/

M+ PAVILION

The first completed portion of the West Kowloon Cultural district, the M+ Pavilion currently serves as an exhibition space until the completion of the M+ museum proper in 2019.

• West Kowloon Cultural District.

https://www.westkowloon.hk/en/mpluspavilion/

GALLERIST PEARL LAM

has been in the business for 20 years, making her a key figure in the rise of the Chinese contemporary art market.

• Pearl Lam Galleries Hong Kong Pedder

601-605 Pedder Building,

12 Pedder Street,

Central Hong Kong

https://www.pearllam.com/

ABOVE SECOND

Above Second is a small space punching well above its weight, as the only gallery in Hong Kong to specialise in urban and street art.

9 First St

Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong

http://www.abovesecondgallery.com/

ART AND DINE

BIBO

Half fine French fare, half art gallery: Bibo’s walls are bedecked with work by Banksy, Damien Hirst, Basquiat and Takashi Murakami – and the dishes look almost as good.

• G/F, 163 Hollywood Road, Sheung Way

DUDDELL’S

The Michelin-starred dim sum is great , but so too is the artwork. Duddell’s runs a rotating series of exhibitions of some of Hong Kong’s and Asia’s finest contemporary art.

• 3/F, Shanghai Tang Mansion, 1 Duddell Street, Central Hong Hong

THE POPSY ROOM

A gallery by day, by night The Popsy Room transforms its space into a private kitchen that takes a multi-sensory approach to food.

• 30 Upper Lascar Row, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

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2017 Art Basel

Did you miss the 2017 Art Basel in June? Here is a great reason to spend 6 mins in a tour de force through the Galleries sector.

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