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WHAT TO COLLECT #124. Pablo Thecuadro

Born in 1992. From Zaragoza but he lives and works in Madrid. There’s only one thing he loves the most: to create images.

Essential but powerful collages, in which Pablo Thecuadro mixes different techniques: from the cut by hand to digital techniques.

Pablo Thecuadro collages go beyond the simply combination of beautiful images; they include the concept of duality in the human being.

His work is a deep, elegant and abstract exploration that brings back to reality, to the human essence.

Copyright @ by Pablo Thecuadro

Read the interview with Artist on https://www.thefashionatlas.com/en/atlas_en/photography_en/the-abstract-collages-by-spanish-artist-pablo-thecuadro.php#prettyPhoto

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #123. ALEX GARANT

Internationally renown as the Queen of Double Eyes, Alex Garant studied visual arts at Notre-Dame–De-Foy College just outside Quebec City. After graduating in 2001, she ultimately settled in Toronto, Canada.

She decided to indeed commit to her passion for Arts after suffering from a heart attack in 2012, changing forever how she would see the world.

As a pioneer of Contemporary Figurative Op Art, her oil paintings offer a graphic quality combined with traditional portrait techniques. Garant establishes herself as one of the leaders of analog Glitch Art by using patterns, duplication of elements,  symmetry and image superposition as crucial elements of her imagery.  Alex Garant’s paintings are indeed conversation pieces as they are meant to engage the observers in an image investigation process and hopefully enlist their senses differently while doing so.

Alex has shown works in Art Galleries all over Canada and the U.S., Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York as well as Australia and Portugal. Her works have also been shown at The Fullerton Museum and The Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH) in California. She has been featured on CB;  her works have been seen in Magazines including hi-fructose, Juxtapoz, BAZAAR, Le Petit Voyeur, Tattoo Fest Magazine, The Art Education Journal, Beautiful Bizarre Magazine and on multiple online platforms including VICE, The Huffington Post, Buzznet, ViralNova, Tory Burch Trends and many more.

Copyright @ Alex Garant

Find out more about the Artist on https://www.alexgarant.com

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #122. JOAN JONAS

Born in 1936 in New York, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video art, and a titan of the American avant-garde.

She is known for blending performance and film in exciting and challenging ways. She rose to artistic fame in the late 1960s for her compelling Mirror Pieces, which featured performers carrying mirrors on stage and slowly, deliberately rotating them, transforming the audience into an image on glass.

Please, watch YouTube movie:

https://youtu.be/rzp6Ehnxq34

#art #installation #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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INSPIRATION #160. ART IN DESIGN

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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The museum pieces that every school kid needs to see.

Tristram Hunt, the director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, recently named five objects in UK museum collections every child should see. We asked five more leading figures in the museum and art worlds to pick out their own must-see items from public collections in the UK. Here’s what they’ve come up with…

Christopher Baker

Director of European and Scottish Art and Portraiture, National Galleries of Scotland

Diana and Actaeon (1556–59), Titian. National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh/National Gallery, London

Diana and Actaeon (1556–59), Titian

National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh/National Gallery, London

A clash between the human world and that of the gods in painting of stunning beauty (with the best dogs in all art!)

The Rosetta Stone

British Museum, London

The ultimate code-breaker that revealed the mysteries of ancient Egypt.

The Snail (1953), Henri Matisse

Tate, London

A joyous image of deceptive simplicity and singing colours, which could inspire your own work.

Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway (1844), J.M.W. Turner

National Gallery, London

Technology dashes into the future in very British weather: will the hare survive?

Angel of the North (1998), Anthony Gormley

Gateshead

Outdoor sculpture on a monumental scale, delicate and awe-inspiring against changing skies.

Maria Balshaw

Director of Tate

Self-portrait, aged 51 (1659), Rembrandt van Rijn. National Galleries of Scotland

Self Portrait, aged 51 (1657), Rembrandt van Rijn

Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh
In this self-portrait, Rembrandt’s direct gaze arrests our attention. The effects of time and experience are written on his face, as he explores the subtle colouring and textures of ageing skin with startling objectivity. The artist left more than 80 paintings, etchings and drawings of himself which record his appearance throughout his career and reflect his changing fortunes.

Handsworth Songs (1986), Black Audio Film Collective

Tate, London

A richly-layered documentary representing the hopes and dreams of post-war black British people in the light of the civil disturbances of the 1980s, Handsworth Songs engages with Britain’s colonial past, public and private memories, and the struggles of race and class.

Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View (1991), Cornelia Parker

Tate, London
This work is made of the restored contents of a garden shed exploded by the British Army at the request of the artist Cornelia Parker. The surviving pieces have been used by Parker to create an installation suspended from the ceiling as if held mid-explosion. Lit by a single lightbulb the fragments cast dramatic shadows on the gallery’s walls.

Hesitate (1964), Bridget Riley

Tate, London
Hesitate is a painting on a rectangular board that features even rows of circular and elliptical shapes. Riley’s paintings of the 1960s are the best-known works of what became called op art, referring to the optical effects that dominate the viewer’s experience of the painting, sometimes having an almost physical effect, destabilising the viewer.

Work (1852–65), Ford Madox Brown

Manchester Art Gallery
Generally considered to be Brown’s most important achievement, Work attempts to portray, both literally and analytically, the totality of the Victorian social system and the transition from a rural to an urban economy.

Alistair Hudson

Director of Whitworth Gallery and Manchester Art Gallery

Brass plaque (16th century), Edo, Benin City. British Museum, London; © Michel Wal, 2009

The Benin Bronzes

British Museum, London

These beautiful artworks are amazingly complex (putting paid to the idea of the ‘primitive’).

Handsworth Songs (1986), Black Audio Film Collective

Tate, London

For the slightly older child, it gives a little bit of a sense of how we got to now.

Work (1852–65), Ford Madox Brown

Manchester Art Gallery

Class, social division, anger, gender and social change, all in one dose.

Alan Turing’s Automatic Computing Engine (ACE)

Science Museum, London

Ushering in the information age, globalisation, hyper-vanity, Fortnite, and some of mankind’s greatest leaps and falls.

John Ruskin’s Lecture Diagrams

Ruskin Library, Lancaster

A comprehensive education from the flawed man whose Victorian equivalent of TED Talks influenced the beginnings of modern environmentalism, the Arts and Crafts movement, the creation of the Labour Party, Gandhi, the National Trust, the conservation of Venice and a general campaign for ecological thinking – the things that children in our day and age will need the most.

Victoria Pomery

Director of Turner Contemporary

Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Rail (1855), Joseph William Mallard Turner. National Gallery, London

Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway (1844), J.M.W. Turner

National Gallery, London

Evocative of the industrial revolution in the 19th century, this work provides a historical counterpart to the environmental degradation we are experiencing today.

The British Library (2014), Yinka Shonibare

The technicolour array of books is spectacular. Displaying the names of hundreds of outstanding British cultural figures, this work feels vital – particularly now as we debate the future of our country.

The Unfinished Conversation (2012), John Akomfrah

Tate, London

This work is a tribute to Stuart Hall’s life and writings. In part a reflection on memory, history, race and identity, it is a film that speaks to all of us.

Untitled, Dunce (2015),  Phyllida Barlow

Arts Council Collection

I love the way Barlow experiments with everyday materials, colour and form to create monumental structures. For me her work fizzes with the creativity and playfulness we should all adopt in our everyday lives.

Why I never became a Dancer (1995), Tracey Emin

Tate, London

Linked to Emin’s life in Margate and growing up, this is an incredibly inspirational film which suggests that anything is possible – it has a fantastic soundtrack, too.

Ed Vaizey

Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries, 2010–16

Illustration of St Mark, from the Lindisfarne Gospels (710–721). British Library

Lindisfarne Gospels

British Library, London

A medieval masterpiece and the oldest surviving version of the New Testament Gospels written in English.

The Rosetta Stone

British Museum

A linguistic treasure. The key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics and unlocking the door to an ancient world.

The Ambassadors (1533), Hans Holbein the Younger

National Gallery, London

An era-defining example of Tudor portraiture crammed with hidden quirks and curiosities.

Humours of an Election (1755), William Hogarth

Sir John Soane’s Museum, London

A series of snapshots capturing the noise and turbulence at the heart of 18th-century politics – as relevant today as ever.

‘Record Plant’ piano

The Beatles Story, Liverpool

The piano on which John Lennon’s final notes were played before a lifetime defining the course of British pop music was cut tragically short.

Originally published on

The museum pieces that every school kid needs to see

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 121. ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol

American, 1928–1987

Inspired by the portraits that Man Ray photographed of Marcel Duchamp’s alter ego, Rrose Sélavy, Andy Warhol created a series of drag self-portraits. Always questioning the conventions of constructed identity, Warhol donned a wig and bold makeup, subverting traditional gender expectations and paying homage to the artists before him.

Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981

Gelatin silver print

Image: 3.5 x 2.25 in. (8.89 x 5.72 cm.)

Sheet: 4.25 x 3.4 in. (10.8 x 8.64 cm.)

American Pop Art icon Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was known for taking photographic portraits of his many friends in and outside of the art world. The photographic medium was critical to Warhol’s artistic production, and he brought his camera with him wherever he went. His photographic oeuvre reads like today’s ubiquitous social media photo streams and provides a fascinating look into the life of an enigmatic figure whose influence on the art world, and society as a whole, is unparalleled. Playing with the notions of identity, perception, and one’s public versus private self, Warhol also took many poignant self-portraits, often in drag, as seen here.

Originally it was published on

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/andy-warhol/self-portrait-in-drag-8

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram

7 Ways to Win Over Collectors on Instagram
ELENA SOBOLEVA
MAY 15TH, 2015 3:17 PM

Following up on part one of our Instagram survey (How Collectors Use Instagram To Buy Art), which brought to light the importance of this social media channel as a tool for sales, we are excited to share the second half of our findings for galleries, which focus on how collectors want to be engaged on Instagram.

1. Collectors on Instagram Expect a Human Touch.

Collectors want personality. 70% of collectors prefer to follow an individual’s Instagram account (belonging to the gallery owner or staff) over the general gallery account. Nearly half of surveyed collectors want to follow gallery owners directly.

Create separate accounts for the gallery owner and staff. Developing individual accounts in tandem with the gallery’s main one will allow for more personal interaction with potential clients, feedback, and an opportunity to start a conversation.

Tip: The official gallery account can (and should) be used for gallery-wide updates, and is great for branding, but collectors crave the inside scoop. Great examples include Andrea Rosen, Zach Feuer, and James Fuentes.
2. Collectors Use #Hashtags Before They Buy.

Among surveyed collectors who use Instagram, 42% claim they often (or very often) look up an artist’s hashtag (#ArtistName) before purchasing their work. Only 6% say they never do this, meaning that 94% of collectors search by hashtag at some point.

#Hashtags enable collectors to instantly aggregate an artist’s content and also reveal public support for an artist. Curators, influencers, and press who have posted their works serve as another seal of approval for collectors. Include artist hashtags to highlight your latest inventory, studio views, and related content.

Tip: Use hashtags specific to an event or area (i.e. #FriezeNY), but don’t overwhelm your followers. Include your gallery hashtag (i.e. #DavidZwirner, #WhiteCube) on brochures and other marketing materials. Visitors to openings and events who use this “official” hashtag serve as brand ambassadors for your business.

#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by  Clemens Kois for Artsy.
#ArtsyTakeover at Collective Art & Design Fair. Photo by Clemens Kois for Artsy.

3. Convert Followers to New Collectors.

Our survey found that nearly half of collectors (46%) are most likely to follow gallery accounts they have already purchased work from. Still, over half follow gallery accounts they either view as tastemakers (27%) or from whom they want to buy (27%).

To capitalize on this purchase intent, make sure your Instagram bio includes contact details so collectors can reach you. Include a physical gallery address, your gallery’s official hashtag, and a link to your website (or your Artsy profile, whichever is a better collector experience).

Tip: To make your bio stand out, format your text outside of Instagram and copy + paste it back into Instagram. We recommend the Notes app, which allows you to add line breaks and special characters.

4. Collectors Want Your Attention.

A common complaint from collectors is that their comments and questions are often ignored, potentially turning them off a gallery. Make it a habit to reply to comments (setting a daily reminder helps), and offer to continue the conversation with potential buyers offline. Additionally, browse through images that others post of your artists and gallery (see #2 above) and like or comment where appropriate. Going the extra mile to engage collectors is a no-brainer. If you don’t already have a social media associate, consider hiring an intern for a 3-month test.

Tip: Maintain the quality of your account by deleting inappropriate or spammy comments on your Instagram photos. On an iPhone, click the comment icon to access the comments, swipe to the left on the comment, and click the trash icon.

5. Make Your Artists Collaborators.

Because collectors actively research and follow artists on Instagram, consider involving artists you represent in collaborations or account takeovers leading up to an opening. Find creative ways to involve your artists with account takeovers, meetups, and hashtag projects to give your followers more personal experiences.

Tip: Collectors told us that they want to follow accounts that show personality, but offer a balance. Check out Artsy’s #ArtWorldSpaces campaign for ideas.
6. Think Globally, Post Locally.

Following closely behind “an imbalance of photos” (posting too much of one type of photo), over-posting was the second most popular reason collectors said they would unfollow someone. We recommend posting a maximum of twice per day and scheduling your posts with purpose. Posting at the wrong time (for most of your followers) means that your content is less likely to be viewed, and much less engaged with.

Tip: Use the “two birds, one stone” adage, and aim to reach key locations during primetime: If you have galleries in NYC and Rome, posting by 6 PM makes sense, but midnight doesn’t.

7. Post Content That Collectors Want To See From Galleries.

When asked what they enjoy most about a gallery’s Instagram feed, more collectors chose “behind the scenes content” (i.e. studio visits and installation day) than “museum shows,” “art fair coverage,” “announcements,” and “gallery views” combined! At a close second was “first look at new inventory.”

And a final note to put things in perspective: While the platform’s influence on art buying behavior is clearly growing, Instagram is but one additional outlet for your digital content. Instagram should be a part of your content strategy and not its own end. Use it for what it is, and don’t forget to enjoy the process!

Originally posted on ARTSY

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WHAT TO COLLECT #119. PIET MONDRIAN

“I wish to approach truth as closely as is possible, and therefore I abstract everything until I arrive at the fundamental quality of objects.”

Born: March 7, 1872 – Amersfoort, The Netherlands

Died: February 1, 1944 – New York, New York

Piet Mondrian, one of the founders of the Dutch modern movement De Stijl, is recognized for the purity of his abstractions and methodical practice by which he arrived at them. He radically simplified the elements of his paintings to reflect what he saw as the spiritual order underlying the visible world, creating a clear, universal aesthetic language within his canvases. In his best known paintings from the 1920s, Mondrian reduced his shapes to lines and rectangles and his palette to fundamental basics pushing past references to the outside world toward pure abstraction. His use of asymmetrical balance and a simplified pictorial vocabulary were crucial in the development of modern art, and his iconic abstract works remain influential in design and familiar in popular culture to this day.

This painting is famous for being the last work of Piet Mondrian which remained unfinished due to his death caused by pneumonia in February 1944. While Mondrian’s works of the 1920s and 1930s have scientific austerity about them, this painting is bright and lively reflecting the upbeat music by which it is inspired. The work was conceived in expectation of victory of the Allied Forces in World War II.
Piet Mondrian is best known for his artistic style Neoplasticism in which he simplified visual compositions to the most basic elements of the straight line, the three primary colors, and the neutrals of black, white and gray. By early 1920s Mondrian had created this new form of abstract art, distinct from Cubism and Futurism. In this painting he has used one large dominant block of red which is balanced by distribution of smaller blocks of yellow, blue, gray and white around it. It is one of his most famous early neoplastic masterpieces.

After following the prevailing trends in Dutch art, Piet Mondrian became involved in the Luminism movement which devoted greater attention to light effects and rendered them using the primary colors. This is the most famous painting of Mondrian’s Luminist period and an important work in his series on the tree theme. In it, he creates a balance between the contrasting hues of red and blue, and between the violent movement of the tree and the blue sky. Mondrian thus produces a sense of equilibrium which remained his artblog #fineart #inspiration #artadvisory #artcollecting #artcollectors #artsignificator #fineart #sculptors #installation #collecting #art #contemporary #contemporaryart #melnikblog #artist

#PietMondrian #Composition #artblog #fineart #inspiration #artadvisory #artcollecting #artcollectors #artsignificator #fineart #sculptors #installation #collecting #art #contemporary #contemporaryart #melnikblog #artist

Copyright @ Piet Mondrian

original articles published on

http://www.m.theartstory.org/artist-mondrian-piet.htm

https://learnodo-newtonic.com/piet-mondrian-famous-paintings

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 120. LIZA RAYN

LIza RAYN

born in 1965 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Ryan earned a BFA at Dartmouth College, (New Hampshire) in 1987 and an MFA from California State University, Fullerton in 1994. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Liza works in photography, video and mixed media. Her interest in the use of visual metaphor remains constant throughout her bodies of work.The J. Paul Getty Museum, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, California) are among the public collections holding works by Ryan.

Copyright @ Liza Ryan

http://www.lizaryan.com

#lizarayn #auction #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Why art exhibitions are returning to domestic settings

A show in the new Kettle’s Yard space highlights why the traditional gallery aesthetic is falling out of favour

Jul 12th 2018

by A.C. CAMBRIDGE

In dining room at Kettle’s Yard, a lemon sits on a pewter dish. Replaced every week, it directs viewers’ eyes to the adjacent wall, where the yellow spot in a painting by Joan Miró gleams a little brighter. Illuminated by an everyday object, “Tic Tic” is one of the many artworks in Kettle’s Yard which proves that intimate and domestic spaces are the best places to appreciate art.

The Cambridge home of the late Jim Ede—a former curator at the Tate—and his wife Helen, Kettle’s Yard is filled with work by the likes of Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi and Elisabeth Vellacott. When the Edes donated their home and its collection to Cambridge University, their caveat was that it be left without labels or plaques; visitors view artworks as equals to the domestic collage of furniture, flowers and ornamental objects. The relationship between viewer and subject is solely personal: where one person is drawn to a glass sculpture by Gregorio Vardanega, another is pulled to the sprawling pot plants reflected inside it.

In the newly opened extension to the house, an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley (pictured, below) also seeks to emphasise the importance of perception. Normally installed in outdoor spaces, Mr Gormley’s recognisable rust-red figures explore the relationship between art, architecture and the earth. The show at Kettle’s Yard claims that “the ‘subject’ of this exhibition is as much our own bodies, their relationship to the sculptures in the galleries and to the architecture of the spaces, as the works themselves.” Above head height, Mr Gormley has struck two steel bars through the gallery’s main space. Casting vertical shadows down the walls, from certain perspectives the shadows conjure up an illusion of glass walls. Viewers walk uneasily around the gallery, not only looking at Mr Gormley’s sculptures but also interacting with the setting itself.

But while Mr Gormley’s wider oeuvre and the placement of his work in natural settings fits with the Edes’ vision, this new exhibition does not quite work. With their concrete floors and plain white walls, the new galleries at Kettle’s Yard contradict the Edes’ desire that the site be “a living place where works of art could be enjoyed…unhampered by the greater austerity of the museum or public art gallery”. Compared with an enormous bronze figure of Mr Gormley’s which stands on the riverbank at nearby Trinity College, or the hundreds of iron men placed on Liverpool’s coastline, in the new galleries his sculptures feel flat and uninspiring. Mr Gormley’s attempt to subvert the space with steel bars and shadows only highlights its shortcomings.

Indeed, the decision to open another “white cube” is not only misguided, but well behind the times. Art in isolation is fast falling out of fashion, which may well be a testament to the attraction of Kettle’s Yard itself. Led by Chatsworth House, Britain’s historic attractions have made a virtue of the combined experience of subject and setting; Damien Hirst’s spot paintings recently brightened up the panelled walls of Houghton Hall, while Jenny Holzer projected text onto the stonework of Blenheim Palace. Opera and contemporary art might once have seemed unlikely bedfellows, but the recent “White Cube at Glyndebourne” partnership was accepted without question. These relationships aren’t just marketing ploys to double the attractions’ potential audiences. In the stately setting of Houghton Hall, “Charity”, Mr Hirst’s 22-foot-tall sculpture of a disabled girl with a broken collection box, becomes particularly poignant.

The trend isn’t limited to old venues and new art: contemporary artists, galleries and audiences are increasingly breaking away from the plain wall, too. In 2014 Hauser and Wirth opened a new space on a farm in Somerset, currently host to the sculptures of Alexander Calder. Dynamic galleries such as Cecelia Brunson Projects and Eleven Spitalfields, both in London, are not just former houses, but current homes.

This return to the domestic setting is fitting, given that the art gallery was born in the home. Joaquín Sorolla’s house in Madrid and Sir John Soane’s house cum museum in London (pictured, top) both retain this dualism, a legacy of the Renaissance period, to great effect. Hans Ulrich Obrist, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, says that a show he held in the 1980s in his own kitchen still informs his work today. It did so particularly in an exhibition he curated in 1999 in the Soane’s museum, where “there were no didactic panels or sound guides, and visitors moved where they wished through the rooms, encountering unexpected works of art in unexpected places.”

As Mr Obrist observes, there is an appealing accessibility in these intimate, lived-in spaces. A spartan room and a security guard can make viewers feel like they’re also on display: trying to engage with the art is like trying to have an intimate conversation in a starkly lit restaurant while an overbearing waiter hovers by your shoulder. Removed from the sacrosanct gallery, art creates a more lasting impression: viewed alongside other objects and in familiar frameworks, artworks are not left behind at the gallery’s door, but carried imaginatively into our everyday lives. Later, when life hands out lemons, the viewer might recall a Miró.

This article is published on https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018/07/12/why-art-exhibitions-are-returning-to-domestic-settings

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

Christie’s Elliot Safra speaks on the Artelligence Podcast ahead of next week’s Art + Tech Summit.

soundcloud.com/artelligence/christies-art-tech-conference

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ART OBSERVATION. PHOTO BASEL & SCOOP. BASEL. 2018

Today I am observing around the Photo Basel and SCOPE in Basel:)!

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#ARTBASEL2018 #Basel #photobasel #scope ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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HOW TO BE INSPIRED BY OTHER ARTISTS WITHOUT COPYING THEM

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 5: composition

Apr 17, 2017 | Inspiration

This is the fifth and final post in the series, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 Each week we’ll look at a single aspect of painting and how…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 4: perspective

Apr 10, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the fourth in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at viewpoints, or perspective. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 3: subject matter

Apr 3, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the third in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at subject matter. Part 1 | Part 2 Each week…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them 2: colour palettes

Mar 27, 2017 | Inspiration

This post is the second in a series of five, in which we’re exploring ways to be inspired by the artists whose work you love, while keeping you focused on developing your own art. Continuing our series, today we’re looking at colour palettes. Part 1 Each…

How to be inspired by other artists without copying them: Part 1

Mar 13, 2017 | Inspiration

Something a bit different this week! This post is the first in a series of five, focused on helping you become ever clearer about what’s unique to you, even while being inspired by other artists. {Which might be handy as we’re all being inspired all the…

a gallery of abstractified art : a selection of works by Abstractify students

Feb 27, 2017 | Inspiration

Last year I put together a virtual exhibition of work from previous Abstractify students to share with you. It was such a great way to showcase their beautiful creations and the possibilities the course offers, I decided to do another this year! As before, I’ve…

This series of articles was originally published on http://taraleaver.com/category/inspiration-2/

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ART OBSERVATION. SWITZERLAND ART AWARD.

***All rights to the artwork or any material remain with the author and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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ARTBASEL2018 #Basel ♥️ #artcollecting #artdealer #artcollectors #art #artist #artbasel #artsignificator #contemporaryart #Contemporary #artfair #artcurator #artsy #artadvisor #mashamelnik #melnikblog #арт #современныйарт #искусство #современноеискусство #арткуратор #машамельник #мельникмаша #коллекционер #галлерея #музей #оценкаарта #артблог #блоггер #артбазель #photo credit Masha Melnik

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ART OBSERVATION. ART BASEL 2018

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