How Much Is Your Object Worth? – Researching Your Art

Reposted from https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

It is hard to establish fixed values for antiques, artworks, and other collectible items. The amount asked or offered is determined by many factors, including the condition of the object, personal interests of both the seller and the purchaser, and trends in the market. According to Smithsonian Institution policy, no staff member may offer monetary evaluations. However, the following guidelines should help you find an approximate value for your artwork.

First, consult price guides to determine current sale and auction prices. Some price guides are available on the Internet, but most come in books or offline formats. Specialized university or art museum libraries and larger public libraries often carry these guides. Price indexes are usually published annually and cover international auctions and galleries.

PRICE GUIDES

ADEC: International Art Prices
Art Sales Index
Davenport’s Art Reference & Price Guide
International Auction Records
Leonard’s Annual Price Index of Art Auctions

For prints, check the following resources:

Gordon’s Print Price Annual
Contemporary Print Portfolio
Lawrence’s Dealer Print Prices International

ONLINE PRICING RESOURCES

invaluable.com

artprice.com

artnet.com

AskArt.com

FindArtinfo.com

MutualArt.com

APPRAISALS & APPRAISERS

Consider finding an appraiser to determine the value of your artwork. Appraisers are trained specialists who work for a fee. They evaluate your piece and give you a written statement of its value. Although the following organizations do not provide appraisals themselves, they each publish a directory of their members. Always seek an appraiser with an expertise in the type of artwork you own.

American Society of Appraisers
11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 310
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 478-2228 or 1-800-ASA-VALU
www.appraisers.org

Appraisers Association of America
212 West 35th Street, 11th Floor South
New York, NY 10001
(212) 889-5404
www.appraisersassoc.org

International Society of Appraisers
303 West Madison Street, Suite 2650
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 981-6778
www.isa-appraisers.org

AUCTION HOUSES

Some auction houses host free “open house” days where visitors can bring in their artworks and have auction-house staff members share their expertise. Other houses allow owners to mail their information with a photograph, and their experts will respond. To find an auction house in your area, search online for “fine art auction houses.”

Originally published on https://americanart.si.edu/research/my-art/object-worth

What We Learned from Writing 7,000 Artist Bios

Reposted October 24, 2018, from Artsy

Communication is increasingly being reduced to 140 characters, emojis, and voice memos. Despite this, clear prose remains a powerful sales and branding tool within the art world, and beyond.

Artsy has created over 7,000 artist bios, and over the years we’ve learned a few things about what our audience of collectors and art lovers finds valuable when discovering new art. Since Artsy’s partners can now add their own artist bios, we decided to take this opportunity to invite Jessica Backus, the Director of Artsy Learning and The Art Genome Project, to share some insights into what makes for a compelling bio and how to eloquently summarize an artist’s practice in 120 words.

If you have—or are planning to include—artist biographies on your website, this article was written for you. Read on for our best practices, mistakes to avoid, and a few SEO tips for your gallery’s artist bios.

GALLERY INSIGHTS
BY JESSICA BACKUS
MAY 12TH, 2016 8:53 PM
Detail from Brie Ruais’s studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Detail from Brie Ruais’s studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

_______________
Why Write A Bio?

An artist bio is often the first piece of information available to readers and collectors, and as such it offers you a chance to frame their practice and give collectors a reason to want to learn more. Bios also drive search engine optimization (SEO). When returning search results, Google and other search engines privilege written content that is “sticky” (i.e. readers spend time on the page and continue browsing), so providing an engaging, well-written bio is a great way to increase discoverability for your artists.

These are the three cornerstones—tried, tested, and used today by our writers at Artsy—of the perfect artist bio:

The bio should summarize the artist’s practice—including medium(s), themes, techniques, and influences.

The bio should open with a first line that encapsulates, as far as possible, what is most significant about the artist and his or her work, rather than opening with biographical tidbits, such as where the artist went to school, grew up, etc. For example, John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus.

The profile should be between 80 and 140 words. The ideal bio is ~120 words, though a tightly written 80-word bio is preferable to a longer bio that includes repetition and filler sentences.

Why 120 Words?

Audience engagement researchers at museums have found that visitors lose interest in wall labels after 150 words. Our philosophy for artist bios is to leave your reader wanting more by limiting your word count to ~120 words. At most, a reader should take away one or two key points.

If you want to provide a more definitive overview of an artist’s practice, consider other channels, such as a press release or a blog post (Artsy Preferred and Premium subscribers can create posts using Writer, our in-house publishing tool).

Portrait of Ryan Foerster by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Portrait of Ryan Foerster by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

____________________________________
Questions to consider when writing about an artist’s practice

Physical

What medium/media does the artist work in?
What is his or her style like?
What work or works can you talk about that will give a visual description of the above qualities?

Subject matter

What are common or characteristic themes depicted in the artist’s work?
What subjects drive the works or provide underlying themes?

Art-Historical

Why is this artist important?
What impact has this artist made on history, or what precedent has he or she set in art-making? What other artists have impacted the artist’s practice?
How does this artist redefine a medium or media?
Who are the artist’s peers or teachers?

Context

In what political or technological climate is the artist working in? I.e. what historical or political events might have influenced the work?

Popular Culture

What areas of the arts or popular culture does this artist incorporate into his or her work?
What other areas of the arts or popular culture does this artist engage with? E.g. creating theatrical sets, costumes, music videos, etc.

Quotes

Can any of the above questions be answered in a brief (1–2 sentences), an engaging quotation from the artist?

Detail from Genieve Figgis’s County Wicklow studio by Doreen Kilfeather for Artsy.
Detail from Genieve Figgis’s County Wicklow studio by Doreen Kilfeather for Artsy.

________________________________
6 Most Common Mistakes in Artist Bios

Hyperbolic praise

It can be tempting to sing your artists’ praises. We’ve noticed, however, that readers do not respond positively to unsubstantiated claims about an artist’s import (e.g. “Artist X is considered one of the most important artists of the post-war period,” or, “Artist Y is widely regarded for her beautiful work”). Most readers will see right through trumped-up language and, even worse, may become skeptical of the rest of your program. The best way to maximize the power of a good bio is to try to educate, not “hard-sell,” your reader. Numerous studies have shown that the hard sell doesn’t work, especially for younger audiences (read: tech-savvy collectors), who respond most positively to simple and authentic messages.

The “laundry list of accomplishments”

We recommend keeping exhibition highlights and accolades to a minimum (readers who are interested can refer to the artist’s CV). Impressive as these may be, these laundry lists are tedious to read in prose format. They also take up precious real estate, which you could otherwise devote to a real discussion of your artist’s practice.

There are certainly instances where it makes sense to include one particularly outstanding prize or exhibition, for example, an artist’s inclusion in the Venice Biennale. In this case, try to find a way to naturally include mention of the distinction in the normal flow of the text.

Artspeak

Misplaced academic jargon and pseudo-theoretical writing are almost universally despised. Instead of trying to impress other curators, academics, and galleries focus on your audience of new collectors who may be completely unfamiliar with your artists. Readers want to glean information from your writing, and the best way to do that is to use simple language. A good rule of thumb is to impart one idea per sentence.

Spelling and Punctuation

Nothing undermines the credibility of your content more quickly than spelling and grammar mistakes. When writing, some best practices are:

Use a serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) to ensure proper formatting of “smart” or curly quotes
Make sure you have the spell check function turned on, and that your language preferences are set to English
Have at least one other person, if not two, read over your text
Don’t forget to put exhibition titles in quotations (e.g., “Greater New York”), and artwork titles in italics (e.g., La Vie, 1903)

Duplicating (or omitting) artist’s nationality, birth year, and death year

It is a common convention in most art writing to include an artist’s nationality, birth year, and death year upon first mention (for example, Alexander Calder [American, 1898–1976]). However, many online databases (including Artsy) store these facts as metadata fields that accompany the artist’s name (see above). Understand how your bio will appear and omit (or include) this information accordingly to ensure consistent formatting and keep clutter to a minimum.

Letting bios get stale

For young artists with rapidly evolving careers, be sure to check back every year, or before new exhibitions, to re-assess what the most important aspects of your artist’s practice are.

—Jessica Backus

We hope that these tips will help you create compelling and effective artist bios (see examples of our favorite artist bios below). Stay tuned for upcoming Gallery Insights editions, including Part 3 of our Art Fairs series, a special edition on selling to tech collectors, and a mini-course on SEO for galleries. In the meantime, learn more about Artsy Gallery Partnerships.

____________________
Our Favorite Artist Bios

HISTORICAL ARTISTS

Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early non-objective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated performance art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making monumental outdoor sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

John Chamberlain

John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus. “My work has nothing to do with car wrecks,“ he has said. “I believe common materials are the best materials.” With its emphasis on paint finishes and the raw materials’ lines and seams, his work has been described as a kind of three-dimensional abstract expressionist painting. While his breakthrough work dates from the 1960s, most recently he has worked with large-scale photography.

HISTORICALLY OVERLOOKED ARTISTS

Carol Rama

In her decades-spanning practice, Carol Rama has explored sexuality and desire through different materials and mediums. Self-taught, Rama began painting as a means of dealing with family tragedies. In her early work in the 1930s and 1940s, she created lustful images of the female body, highlighting sexuality and pleasure as major themes. Rama later experimented with abstraction and assemblage in the vein of arte povera, using bicycle tires from her father’s factory before he declared bankruptcy and committed suicide. She returned to making paintings and watercolors in the 1980s. The recipient of the Golden Lion at the 50th Venice Biennale, Rama falls outside the confines of any particular artistic movement or period, but she remains a seminal figure and an important influence to artists such as Cindy Sherman and Kiki Smith.

ESTABLISHED LIVING ARTISTS

Christopher Williams

The often-opaque themes in Christopher Williams’s works have in common the artist’s fascination with obsolescence and the relationship between photographs and the objects they document. Known for his high-gloss, crisply focused photographs, reminiscent of the commercial photography of a bygone era, Williams’s subjects range from stacked Ritter Sport chocolate bars to old cameras that have outlived their usefulness. Williams ironically references the practice of retouching in advertising by highlighting the small but conspicuous imperfections in his own subjects or, as in the case of Kodak Three Point Reflection Guide, © 1968 Eastman Kodak Company, 1968 (Corn) (2003), trying to ‘sell’ a food item that is clearly made out of plastic. Former Editor-in-Chief of Artforum Tim Griffin described Williams’s approach as “sociophotographic,” meaning that the work explores underlying codes within photography, advertising, and ethnography.

EARLY- AND MID-CAREER ARTISTS

Tal R

Tal R uses the word kolbojnik, meaning “leftovers” in Hebrew, to describe his practice of sourcing and collecting a wide range of imagery, figurative and abstract, from high and low culture. Like work by Donald Baechler, Maira Kalman, and Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tal R’s paintings, with their bold brushstrokes, colorful patterns, and exuberantly painted imagery, give the false impression of childlike simplicity. Interested in creation myths and darker themes, Tal R always conveys a sense of joy and generosity of spirit.

EMERGING DESIGNERS

Chris Schanck

Furniture designer Chris Schanck is interested in materials and design processes that are not traditionally associated with luxury, mass-production, and standards of perfection. “If we accept the idea that [an object] doesn’t have to be reproducible and doesn’t have to mimic a commercial form or process, then what are the limits of that?” Schanck asks. Among his best-known pieces are those that comprise his “ALUfoil” series, in which industrial or discarded materials are covered in aluminum foil, painted, and then sealed with resin. The final pieces are both durable and light. His methods characteristically involve both marginalized techniques as well as the help of marginalized members of his Detroit community. Schanck has a background in commercial model-making and has produced commissioned works for Tom Ford.

Originally posted on Artsy

WHAT TO COLLECT # 134. SIMONE LEIGH

SIMONE LEIGH

(b. 1967, Chicago)

lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo presentations of Leigh’s work have been hosted by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Studio Museum in Harlem (Marcus Garvey Park), New York; New Museum, New York (all 2016); Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Creative Time, New York (both 2014); and The Kitchen, New York (2012). The artist’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including the Berlin Biennial (2018); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, New Museum, New York (2017); Unconventional Clay: Engaged in Change, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Mo.; Greater New York, MoMA PS1, Long Island City (both 2016); The Dakar Biennial (2014); Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (traveled to Grey Art Gallery, New York; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco [2012–15]); The Whitney Biennial, New York (2012); 30 Seconds off an Inch, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2009); The Future As Disruption, The Kitchen, New York (2008); and Intersections: Defensive Mechanisms, Abrons Art Center, New York (2008). Her work has been recognized with awards and honors from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York (2018); Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2017); A Blade of Grass, New York (2016); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, New York (both 2016); Creative Capital, New York (2012); and the Joan Mitchell Foundation (2011).

https://www.simoneleigh.com/

On image: Exhibition | Simone Leigh: Haunting Race and Gender at Jack Tilton, New York

What’s Her Face Series, “Beaded Head”. 2012. Simone Leigh. Sculpture.

On image: Simone Leigh’s impactful show of new work at the Hammer Museum.

 

***All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

Check out the best kept secrets to buying art as an investment.

Check out the best kept secrets to buying art as an investment by Saatchi Art.

http://s3.amazonaws.com/document.issuu.com/180913233342-a0eebe59dd18143a2e0bbe259894f072/original.file?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAI3AWG2EVNT4VZFNQ&Expires=1539329235&Signature=bekcSVfugbd5AxNOk06HwBexqWw%3D

10 WAYS TO UNSUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST

Marketing yourself as an artist can often feel like a full-time job. But it doesn’t have to be this way!

If you’ve ever wished for an honest checklist of marketing tactics to avoid, consider it an early Christmas gift. Stop making these common self-promotion mistakes and you will quickly feel the luck turning in your favor.

  1. Avoiding self-promotion

It’s typical of artists to shy away from self-promotion. All kinds of reasons bubble up to the surface once you press an artist about the promotional opportunities available online: it’s too complex, they don’t know how to do it, they don’t have the time to do it, they’re worried about someone stealing their work and ideas… The list is endless, take your pick. In truth, many artists are simply put off by the idea of actively promoting themselves and their artwork. So they choose to ignore it.

It must be said that the style and strategy of self-promotion is completely up to the artists themselves. Although the ultimate goal of self-promotion is to increase sales, the promotional strategy should never be that blunt. Self-promotion can be the one thing that makes or breaks your career as an artist, so don’t ignore all the great opportunities lying at your fingertips. If you don’t snatch them, someone else will!

Even someone as successful as Banksy acknowledges that marketing your art isn’t an easy proposition. | Banksy

  1. Promoting your work, but not the philosophy behind it

Why do so many people avoid art galleries? Because art can be (and often is) intimidating. If there’s no behind-the-scenes story to shed light on your creative process and philosophy, people might be wary of engaging with it for the fear of being exposed as “unsophisticated” and “uneducated.” The old myth that only art critics and art dealers can have an opinion about art is still very much alive and thriving.

“People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.”

Letting people in on the purpose of your work, talking about why you’re doing it, and revealing the reasons driving your creative decisions will make your artwork seem more accessible, and therefore, more appealing. Simon Sinek, a visionary thinker who teaches people how to lead with why, is known for saying, “People don’t buy ‘what’ you do, they buy ‘why’ you do it.” Let your philosophy shine through your marketing messages and don’t be afraid to show your mistakes and missteps; it only makes your art more human.

  1. Having a lousy web presence

A vibrant online portfolio or showcase is a crucial part of your brand image, but sadly, it isn’t nearly enough to grab people’s attention these days and stand out from the crowd. A strong web presence means making the most out of all the digital channels that are relevant to your field of expertise. This can include maintaining a thriving Vimeo or YouTube channel, running a diverse blog, actively posting on social media platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram, or building an email list of raving fans. Or, ideally, all of the above. Having a strong web presence means you’re just a quick Google search away from your existing and potential fans.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing.

You must understand that people don’t buy or look at art products every day. It’s more of a special occasion kind of thing. Whether it’s a Christmas gift or a little pick-me-up treat, it has to be easily accessible online and capture buyers in the right intent.

  1. Signing your artwork with your first name only

Think of every piece you create as a potential marketing tool. If you sign your work with your first name only, it makes it almost impossible for those who like your art to find you. Unless you’re signing under a pseudonym or have a very unusual name, it’s always best to include your full name. A new admirer can simply pop your full name into a Google search and locate your online portfolio almost instantly. However, if you only sign with a common first name like “John” or “Sarah,” it will take a very passionate fan to sift through a pile of search results until they find your website.

Another mistake that artists often make is placing their signature in an area that can be easily cropped. Yes, it’s outrageous to think that someone would do that, but cropping is more common than you’d like to think. Sometimes it happens because an image needs to be resized, sometimes it’s done maliciously. Whatever the reason, you need to be thinking about this when choosing a spot for your signature. Be smart and protect your artwork from copyright thieves.

Consider setting actual prices. If people don’t know how much your art costs, they probably won’t ask.

  1. Using poor quality visuals

Many artists make the same boring mistake of using poor quality images to showcase and promote their work. Imagine walking into a physical store and finding used products on a shelf, with a handwritten note explaining that these are only representations of the real products… That wouldn’t get you in the right mood for buying, would it? It cannot be stressed enough that compelling visuals fire up buyer’s imagination and improve conversion rates. Great images elevate and strengthen your visual brand and can help you sell more, so think about what your customers might want to see and learn about the product before they make a purchase and brush up on your product photography skills.

  1. Using a cookie-cutter branding strategy

The first thing you want to do when crafting a powerful branding strategy is to make sure your brand voice and visual story are cohesive and unique. Ensure that all your social media channels, your personal website and blog use the same colors, fonts, imagery and messaging, but please, don’t be another artist with a Comic Sans banner on their site. Stay true to your philosophy and creative process and try to funnel that information into your branding. Let your art guide you and you won’t fail.

  1. Targeting everyone

You could say that the whole world is your target market. Who doesn’t like art, right? But you couldn’t be more wrong. Art comes in a rainbow of different colors, shapes, textures, sizes, and functionalities. And so do people (well, not exactly, but you get the point). To craft a winning marketing campaign and see your artwork flying off the shelves — even if they’re digital — you must start by defining your target audience. It might be intimidating at first (yes, you’re not a marketer), but the best approach is to look at your past clients — who are they? How did they find you? Why did they buy from you? Once you have all the answers, you can use that information to map out the tools and channels that will enable you to reach a similar audience. If your fans hang out in a particular online forum, an online art shop, or anywhere else — you need to be there and be visible.

If you haven’t had any sales yet, don’t despair. Research artists who are in a similar field and study their strategy. Is there anything that you can borrow and build on? Remember, to succeed you must find people who not only love your art but are happy to pay for it, too.

Presentation matters. Doll these pine cones up in an attractive basket with a bow made from strips of bark and people will pay double.

  1. Relying solely on social media

There’s no denying that social media is a powerful tool that allows artists to build and nurture their fanbase. However, relying exclusively on social media channels to gain exposure and attract new buyers is risky, if not irresponsible. Overdoing the self-promotion on social media can damage your brand and shrink your following. Remember, engaging and connecting with your fans should be the number one goal of social media strategy. There’s nothing wrong with sharing a link to your new blog post or updated portfolio, but bombarding fans with one promotional update after another will most likely be seen as spamming.

  1. Building your network in the art world only

Let’s be honest. Other artists are unlikely to become your loyal customers. It’s great to have connections in the art world when it comes to forming creative partnerships, being part of important events, or simply surrounding yourself with like-minded people. However, having a bunch of connections outside the art world enables you to call in favors and seek advice when it’s most needed. Rather than spending hours trying to get your head around the basics of SEO, you could seek help from someone in your network that has the right skillset. The more diverse is your network, the further its tentacles can reach.

  1. Not paying attention to SEO

SEO is a hot topic right now. Why? Because for thousands of online buyers, if you don’t exist online, you don’t exist at all. And when done right, SEO is basically free advertising. Claiming the top spots in search page results and showing up in the right searches is key to driving enough traffic to your website or creative portfolio. If people are not finding your work online, how will they buy it? SEO is something that takes a lot of work and doesn’t happen overnight, so it’s crucial to have a well planned out content strategy to beat your competition. If you feel like it’s definitely not something you can do yourself, don’t hesitate to hire a freelancer to get it sorted for you.

Originally published on https://www.sketchbook.com/blog/10-ways-to-unsuccessfully-market-yourself-as-an-artist/

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 133. Danielle Cohen

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

I am trying to test the body and fuzziness as they appear in my private life, I deal with gender, pain, relationship or entity.
I Especially enjoyed testing the limits of suffering, the border between Erotica pornography and documentary as well as the line between the
personal and intimate private and public spheres. I test my conflict with myself many times in feminine and seductive that is far away from my own self-image and gender when I ascribe to a new image that I create diverse deflections that are associated with such dissemblance.

I disguise myself a lot, but always in order to reveal, sometimes up to the  stem cells and nerves, and the friction with the viewer is
somewhere between pleasure and pain, exciting and delightful.
My occupation with boundaries is almost obsessive , I can say decisively that there is an interface between art and my personal life, and I can hardly separate the two. I place myself in situations that are discomforting to me  and even threaten me, and the discomfort I feel brings out of me something that I feel  Satisfied with.

Images from collection: FASHION & FINE ART

Find more on https://www.daniellecohendinar.com/

Copyright © Danielle Cohen Dinar

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 132. Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura is a visual artist based in Austin with a diverse multi-media practice. She received her BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from UT Austin. Teruko has exhibited in the U.S. and Mexico, and has completed three temporary public art installations in the last year.  She is currently a member of ICOSA art collective, a participant in the City of Austin’s Launchpad program for public art, and one of three Austin artists featured in the 2017 TX Biennial.

More information on https://www.terukonimura.net/

https://pin.it/yxkjxalfuul4ck

Copyright @ Teruco Nimura

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 131. JOHN BROOKS

His work is playful, creepy, energising and anthropomorphic. Stare at these fuzzy wonders long enough and you would swear you saw a heart beat or a leg twitch. This small body of work packs a lot of punch both visually and conceptually. The work stands as a kind of strange timeline not just from one year of fashion to the next but a sort of endless amount of time in between.Brooks fuses weaving techniques into his textile based art pieces bridging that invisible gap between craft and conceptual art.

Please, find more information http://www.johnbrooks.com.au/new-page/

Copyright @ John Brooks

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

WHAT TO COLLECT # 130. Anish Kapoor

Mirroring its surroundings to reflect a rose-tinted microcosm of ambient space, UntitledANISH KAPOOR - UNTITLED, stainless steel and paint, 120 by 120 by 27.5cm., Executed in 2010 is an exquisite example of Anish Kapoor’s inimitable investigation into the possibilities of interior and exterior space. Seeming to float effortlessly in suspense above the ground, Kapoor’s dish appears to simultaneously curve outwards and inwards, distorting perception and awareness as our gaze passes across it. The luminous reflectivity of the surface radiates light, and emits a sense of meditative calm and repose. Untitledinvites contemplation: by circumnavigating the work we become an integral part of the whole, thus making every viewer’s experience of the piece subtly different.
Untitled forms part of Kapoor’s iconic corpus of mirrored sculptures, in which the possibilities of the circular format in a range of reflective materials and colors are explored. The seductive red of the present work, however, is of particular significance. Kapoor has always considered red to be a highly symbolic color, and many of his most important large-scale works – such as Marsyas, My Red Homeland (both 2003) Past, Present, Future (2006) and Svayambh (2007) – have been executed in varying shades of red. Kapoor has spoken of the importance of red in his work: “I use red a lot… It’s true that in Indian culture red is a powerful thing; it is the color a bride wears; it is associated with the matriarchal, which is central to Indian psychology. So I can see what leads me there culturally, but there’s more to it. One of the ways color has been used in art since the Eighteenth Century is to move, as in Turner, from color to light. I tend to go from color to darkness. Red has a very powerful blackness. This overt color, this open and visually beckoning color, also associates itself with a dark interior world. And that’s the real reason I’m interested in it” (Anish Kapoor in conversation with Nicholas Baume in Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Anish Kapoor: Past, Present, Future, 2008, p. 31).

Untitled also invites connections with the idea of the Sublime, in particular, the post-modern version of the concept as posited by Jean-François Lyotard. Lyotard argued that certain examples of contemporary art sought to represent ideas or themes which were impossible to truly delineate in physical form, thus arousing sensations of awe and bewilderment in the viewer as we are forced to confront concepts our mind is unable to truly comprehend. Lyotard viewed the work of Barnett Newman – with its walls of pure color undisturbed by figural or objective concerns – as being the ultimate exponent of the post-modern Sublime; yet, Kapoor’s mirrored works arguably also fulfill the conditions of post-modern Sublimity in their profound exploration of complex theory and philosophy through a totally abstract dialectic. The shimmering surfaces and the curved space of the series of wall mounted mirror installations induce a corresponding sense of disorienting arrest, not only cognitively but also physically and spatially. Indeed, the Sublime has been of abiding fascination for Kapoor throughout his career, and he has frequently spoken of the idea about his mirrored works: “It seemed it was not a mirrored object but an object full of mirroredness. The spatial questions it seemed to ask were not about deep space but about present space, which I began to think about as a new sublime. If the traditional sublime is in deep space, then this is proposing that the contemporary sublime is in front of the picture plane, not beyond it. I continue to make these works because I feel this is a whole new spatial adventure” (Anish Kapoor quoted in ibid., p. 52). As an object of immense beauty and commanding authority, Untitled is a masterful encapsulation of Kapoor’s highly assured manipulation of spatial territory.

Originally published on Sotheby’s

Copyright © Anish Kapoor http://anishkapoor.com/

Another works by Artist

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***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT #129. Yves Klein

Born: April 28, 1928 – Nice, France

Died: June 6, 1962 – Paris, France

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War. For some critics he is a descendent of Marcel Duchamp, a prankster who lampooned settled understandings of painting and opened art up to new media. Others consider him as a descendant of earlier avant-garde artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Aleksander Rodchenko, who were also attracted to the monochrome. And even in the ways he used performance later on in his career, he is like many artists who rediscovered some of the tactics of earlier avant-gardes in the 1950s and ’60s. Klein might also be compared to his contemporary Joseph Beuys, for, like Beuys, he embraced aspects of Romanticism and mysticism – Klein was intrigued by Eastern religion and Rosicrucianism, and was even influenced by judo. Also like Beuys, many have condemned him as an obscurantist and a charlatan: yet the brevity, wit, and seductive beauty of much of his work continues to inspire.

Yves Klein, Anthropometry series Tate Shots interview with one of Klein’s models and performers

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 128. Cristina Coral

Educated in Italy where she lives and works as a photographer.
Her approach to photography and its development was almost entirely self-taught.
She has lived her childhood in an artistic environment.
Her father was a composer, music and art have always been a very important part of her life. She has chosen the camera as my main artistic expression since 2012.

If you would like to know something more or for info about art purchases you can write to : cristinacoral@yahoo.it

Artworks by Cristina Coral are available as limited edition prints, professionally printed on museum quality archival paper.
I guarantee max. 20 or 10 copies of 1 artwork in different sizes as a limited edition.
Each artwork is signed and numbered on the reverse of the photograph and certificate.

Originally published here

Copyright © Cristina Coral

Cristina-Coral-2Cristina-Coral-10curtain_8_670DSC_0195_1340_cDSC_0984-copia_800

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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10 Secrets for Promoting Your Art on Instagram

by Madelaine Buttini December 07, 2017

Using social media platforms, like Instagram and Facebook, to share your art is a great way to promote your creations online. We now have the opportunity to share our artworks at to millions of people in real time!

You never know where a post will lead your career and what opportunities you may receive in return. I have had great benefits from using Instagram and really wanted to share with you my top ten secrets for promoting your art on this much loved platform.

Connect Your Instagram with Your Facebook Page

You get some awesome insight features when you connect your Instagram to your Facebook page. Once you have done the integration you will have a much better understanding of your Instagram page!

This can be helpful when you are trying to work out what time is best to post and on what days. You can also see other useful information such as the amount of impressions, reach, profile views, website clicks and email clicks your page has generated in the past seven days. If you wanted to dig a little deeper you can also see this for individual posts to get a grasp of what people are liking most — this can be done over a 2 year period.

I also love how it tells in depth information about your followers, such as the percentage of men to women, the top locations and age range. This can be particularly great when you are starting out with your online store or website. You know what your main demographic and audience is and where they may come from!

Read Instagram’s advice on integrating your pages together here.

Use Popular & Relevant Hashtags

I think this is a really important part of promotion no matter how large or small your brand is. Hashtags have become an integral way that we share our photos to other people we may not necessarily cross paths with online.

On my collage posts I use the terms #collageart #collage_art #contemporarycollage #australianartist, this way when people go to these hashtags they are more likely to come across my art.

Research other artists like yourself and find what terms they use, incorporate some of the hashtags they use into your posts and see what works best. This could have the potential to increase your reach and impressions for you Instagram page! But of course, like anything it is really trial and error, so switch it up.

Post High Quality Images of Your Art

Nobody likes to see low quality anything, it can be difficult to interpret and hard to vibe off. The same is for Instagram, no one wants to view low quality photographs or videos of your art. Always make sure to take photos at the highest resolution!

Pssst… if you are using an iPhone turn on HDR.

If you are making digital collages, always make sure the images you use are at the highest resolution and the size of your “canvas” is at it’s highest dimensions. I recommend using the dimensions: 1080 x 1080 px and at 200 dpi.

A little note for posting images: People seem to prefer square images over rectangular!

What will happen if you hound your followers to buy your art!

Don’t Always Try To Sell To Your Followers

I know that it’s awesome when you make a sale from a follower on Instagram, but that’s not what they are there for! Yeah, you have beautiful art to offer but you don’t always have to shove it in their faces. It can be really tempting to push for sales (everyday) but it will only hinder them from wanting to purchase and they may unfollow you.

If you are lacking in sales maybe they don’t know about your online store yet. So definitely do a post here and there about your products but not all the time! Limit it to once a week and make sure your website is easily visible in your about me section of your Instagram.

Give Your Followers Love

Your followers are those you should be nurturing, they are not only potential customers but they give your art the love it needs online.

I always recommend giving love to new followers, those who comment and like your posts. Simply give them a like on a few of their photos so that they will feel like the love is reciprocated!

Start Your Own Hashtag

I highly recommend this one! If you haven’t already started using your own hashtag, what a perfect time to start doing so. It’s an easy way for people to view your work and to start a “trend”.

I have my own hashtag, #madbutt which I put on every collage post and check daily. It’s great when you see people sharing your work and using that hashtag – it means you’re really getting your work out there!

Post Frequently Throughout The Week

This is really up to your own discretion and if you have the amount of work to share. I recommending post at least three times a week, minimum. I know of artists who post three things a day, seven days a week and for me I think that could be a little overbearing for some people who follow me. It’s definitely up to what you feel comfortable doing!

Posting is all about consistency too. For example you could post on Monday, Tuesday and Friday. You can always double check if that works well with the stats you collected from your Instagram Insights!

If you don’t have a lot of work to post, don’t worry — use this as motivation to get your body of work at a larger size and start posting!

Write Interesting & Captivating Captions

People will be drawn into your beautiful creations and would like to hear a little bit about what it means to you and how you relate back to it. Sometimes you don’t even have to write about anything!

It could always be a cool title of your work, what music you are digging that day or an inspirational quote. But either way, think of something just as creative as the work you made and don’t forget to use your hashtags!

Tag Your Favourite Art Relevant Pages

I think this a great way of getting Instagram art blogs and profiles to view your art and hopefully reposted (yay, free promotion)! Find some of your favourite pages on Instagram and go through who they are following to see what other pages you might like.

If you need inspiration I recommend pages like @taxcollection, @ratedmodernart and @love.watts.

Now you don’t want to tag them in your caption, you want to tag them in the image itself so it’s viewable on their profile under the tagged section. You can do this while you are posting the image (just hit edit and tag people).

Be Authentic & Don’t Hesitate

The best thing to do in the end is just be yourself, some people will love you and some people might not. You can’t control their feelings and it’s inevitable that people might disagree with what you say or what you create.

That is the beauty in being an artist — you get to express yourself! Don’t hesitate to express yourself and be who you are. As long as it’s positive there is nothing to worry about!

So, that’s my ten secrets for promoting your art on Instagram. I hope you find them useful and helpful for your own Instagram! Happy posting everyone.

x Madbutt

Originally published on

https://madbutt.com.au/blogs/madbutt/tips-on-promoting-your-art

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

email@artcuratoronline.com

Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence?

Is the Art Market Ready to Embrace Work Made by Artificial Intelligence? Christie’s Will Test the Waters This Fall

The auction house is selling an AI-produced work of art for the first time this fall.

• Naomi Rea 3 days ago

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

Christie’s New York will make history this fall when it becomes the first auction house to sell a work of art made by artificial intelligence. The print on canvas, a product of an algorithm developed by the French art collective Obvious, will be included in the auction house’s prints and multiples sale October 23-25.

Hugo Caselles-Dupré, a member of the Paris-based collective, told artnet News that they were “interested in the philosophical approach behind this,” he said. “Can an algorithm be creative? If so, this algorithm is the closest to the human mind’s creativity.”

The work was created using a model called a Generative Adversarial Network. The artists first fed a generator a dataset of 15,000 portraits done between the 14th and 20th centuries. It then created new works based on the training set until it was able to fool a test designed to distinguish whether an image was made by human or machine.

The resulting work, titled Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, depicts a man in a dark coat and white collar with indecipherable facial features that reside somewhere in the uncanny valley. The unique piece, a gold-framed canvas print that is currently on view in Christie’s London showroom, is estimated at $7,000-10,000. The collective says it will use the proceeds from the sale to further train its algorithm, finance the computational power needed to make such works, and experiment with 3D modeling.

Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, Generative Adversarial Network print on canvas (2018).

The Christie’s sale constitutes an important validation in the realm of AI art. Although there are many so-called “creative coders” who use similar technologies to improve web experience, few are considered contemporary artists. The members of Obvious see themselves as conceptual artists whose main goal is to democratize Generative Adversarial Networks and legitimize AI-produced art.

“We wanted to propose this new approach to a more traditional market rather than the tech area,” Caselles-Dupré said. “At the beginning it was difficult to be understood by the traditional art market because they were looking at us like, ‘Who are those guys? What is this new weird stuff?’ But the more we’ve explained what we’re doing, what we want to share, and what we want to say, the more the art world is paying attention to our work.”

Following the Christie’s sale, Obvious plans to work with brands and galleries to expand the movement. “We really believe that AI can be a new tool for art,” Caselles-Dupré said. “In 1850, when the camera showed up, it was only used by highly qualified engineers and so it was not considered for its artistic potential. We think we are in the same situation, because people view us as engineers but we really think this type of technology will be used more and more in art.”

Installation view of Obvious Art’s 𝒎𝒊𝒏 𝑮 𝒎𝒂𝒙 𝑫 𝔼𝒙 [𝒍𝒐𝒈 𝑫 (𝒙))] + 𝔼𝒛 [𝒍𝒐𝒈(𝟏 − 𝑫(𝑮(𝒛)))], Portrait of Edmond de Belamy (2018).

The collective began a conversation with Christie’s following a London symposium on the implications of blockchain for the art world. “Christie’s continually stays attuned to changes in the art market and how technology can impact the creation and consumption of art,” said the auction house’s head of prints and multiples, Richard Lloyd, in a statement. “AI has already been incorporated as a tool by contemporary artists and as this technology further develops, we are excited to participate in these continued conversations.”

Edmond de Belamy is one of 11 portraits of the fictional Belamy family, which is named after Ian Goodfellow, the AI researcher who invented the Generative Adversarial Network method in 2014. (“Goodfellow” roughly translates to the French bel ami.) Another portrait from the family, Le Comte de Belamy, sold to Parisian collector Nicolas Laugero-Lassere earlier this year.

Originally published on the artnet News

https://news-artnet-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/news.artnet.com/market/artificial-intelligence-christies-1335170/amp-page

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 127. KAWS

Born in 1974 in Jersey City, NJ, USA

Lives and works in New York, USA

Considered one of the most relevant artists of his generation, KAWS engages audiences beyond the museums and galleries in which he regularly exhibits. His prolific body of influential work straddles the worlds of art and design to include paintings, murals, large-scale sculptures, street art, and graphics and product design. Over the last two decades, KAWS has built a successful career with work that consistently shows his formal agility as an artist, as well as his underlying wit, irreverence, and affection for our times. He often draws inspiration and appropriates from pop culture animations to form a unique artistic vocabulary for his works across various mediums.

Now admired for his larger-than-life sculptures and hard edge paintings that emphasize line and color, KAWS’ cast of hybrid cartoon and human characters are perhaps the strongest examples of his exploration of humanity. His refined graphics language revitalizes figuration with big, bold gestures and keen, playful intricacy. As seen in his collaborations with global brands, KAWS’ imagery possesses a sophisticated humor and reveals a thoughtful interplay with consumer products. Highly sought-after by collectors inside and outside of the art world, KAWS’ artworks, with their broad appeal, establishes him as one of the most prominent artists in today’s culture.

KAWS (b. 1974, Jersey City, New Jersey; lives and works in Brooklyn, New York) has exhibited internationally in major museums. His recent solo exhibitions include KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2016) which traveled to the Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); KAWS, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Longside Gallery, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (2016). His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2017); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Málaga, Spain (2014); Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas (2013); Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia (2013); and the High Art Museum, Atlanta, Georgia (2011).

His monumental sculptures have been shown in prestigious locations including the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, United Kingdom and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

KAWS Is Bringing a Giant Floating Figure to Seoul’s Seokchon… https://hypebeast.com/2018/6/kaws-holiday-seokchon-lake-seoul-korea

COPYRIGHT @ by KAWS

Originally published on https://www.perrotin.com/artists/Kaws/55/view-of-the-exhibition-where-the-end-starts-curated-by-andrea-karnes-at-modern-art-museum-of-fort-worth-fort-worth-usa-2016/10000012698

#art #installation #kaws #exhibition #animals #artcollecting #artcollector #artcurator #artadvisor #collection #artcollection #artmuseum #artgallery #contrmporaryart #contemporary #modernart #design #artlovers #inspiration #artcollecting #artsignificator #melnikblog #ArtForYou

***All rights to artwork remain with the artist and can be removed from the website on request at any time. Please, contact us by email

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WHAT TO COLLECT # 126. Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky – “A Late Bloomer”

Considered to be the father of abstract art, Wassily Kandinsky was what might be considered  “a late bloomer” concerning his art. Born to a family of musicians, he learned to play the piano and cello. When he was 20 years old he chose to study law and economics and attended the University of Moscow where he lectured and also wrote about spirituality. At the age of 30, Kandinsky left Moscow and went to Munich to study life-drawing, sketching and anatomy. At the age of 37 (which was at one time considered “middle aged”) he had his first exhibition. The artist’s unrelenting quest for new forms fueled his passion for painting almost until his death in 1944, at the age of 78.

Kandinsky once remarked, “The spirit, like the body, can be strengthened and developed by frequent exercise. Just as the body, if neglected, grows weaker and finally impotent, so the spirit perishes if untended.”

As these artists remind us, it is important to follow our hearts, know what we are born to do, and nourish our creative spirit. Even when we encounter periods of withdrawal we must find the way to reclaim it.

Article originally published on

“Famous Artists Who Reclaimed Their Artistic Passion” By Renee Phillips https://www.healing-power-of-art.org/?p=1387

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