WHAT TO COLLECT # 140. DeSoto

THE ARTIST

A creative mind since birth, Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto) has had an extensive journey in the arts. He began to sing at age eighteen and later on compose music in his early twenties. Spending over thirty years in the music industry, Pepe always had a passion for the visual arts. He immersed himself in the world of photography shortly after retiring from music. Over the years, his passion for photography combined with his natural talent in digital art led to the creation and evolution of his signature style known as Fragmented Reality. 

Fragmented Reality is a reflection of human nature. Each subject is divided, broken down into a profusion of feelings. Like a puzzle, an answer lies behind each piece. An unfinished masterpiece yearning for completion.

From this foundation, DeSoto began to create a series of experiments in search of new textures that broke away from traditional color palettes. His newest collection known as Translucent Dimension is a result of a year’s worth of what he calls “artistic discovery.” DeSoto not only discovered new textures but utilized light to create something indescribably beautiful.

The Mother of Pearl effect which he achieved with many of the pieces in Translucent Dimension draws in the viewer and captures them with its abyss of layers. The collection’s ability to give off a luxurious feel adds a touch of class that separates it from traditional art.

“I knew that Fragmented Reality was only the beginning of my work and not the end. The true beauty of art lies in that it is as infinite as the human mind”

— Pepe Soto (aka DeSoto)

OVERBOARD DIVAS.E.L.F.SUN BATHING
* All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 139

The DUSKMANN collective formed in 2015, a union of visionary minds with a clear artistic direction and above all, a desire for continual creative experimentation. DUSKMANN’s goal is to gather complex forms of expression within a single universe, enhancing the peculiarities that distinguish them. They work in a range of fields, thus creating an ecosystem with a great deal of creative biodiversity and releasing powerful, expressive energy in a single soul on the Renaissance model.

About Artist

PRELUDE was born during a trip to Sicily. The artists were entranced by the beauty of Sicilian marbles and the figures evoked by their veining. With their characteristically minimal, post-atomic approach, somewhere between pure art and a careful study of form, they photographed them, framed them and installed them, paying careful attention to their geometries. When they came across a large jasper, sculpted by nature itself into the shape of a heart, they smoothed it down and made it the centerpiece of their work. This jasper is the beating heart, the focal point, from which the perspective on the surrounding pieces begins. The Prelude series consists of 41 black and 41 white pieces. These are photographs selected from over 2,000 taken of marbles as part of the project’s obsessive preparation. On the back of every piece is an octagonal fragment of jasper which makes them unique and reconnects them to the great central heart like the consequence of some metaphorical explosion. A continuous dichotomy, the power of opposites and the synthesis of contemporary complexities are DUSKMANN’s lifeblood and, not coincidentally, give the collection its name: a twilight soul capable of negotiating the contradictions of its time.

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*All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed on request at any time.

WHAT TO COLLECT # 138. Pao-Leng Kung

Art Description by Artist Pao Leng Kung

In my works, I magnify some elements during the working process: the erasure of color, the relationship between positive and negative spaces, and the space inside and outside the canvas.

Typically, I use ‘ white’ as a force to expand unlimited space or as an emptiness to fill all the colors by imagination. Also ‘ white’ could refer to the white of exhibition space, gesso, and the natural canvas. Because of this, it opens far more possibilities to transfer the undefined space inside and outside of my paintings.

For the other colors and stripes, they serve as multiple roles within complicatedly interactive layers and transition between positive/ negative spaces. They are the main body that constructs the base for the whole picture, while they are too supporting roles that step by step builds up the existence of negative space.

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Copyright@Pao Leng Kung

All rights to shared artworks remain with the artist and can be removed from the on request at any time.

Why Love Generative Art? Article by Jason Bailey

Over the last 50 years, our world has turned digital at breakneck speed. No art form has captured this transitional time period – our time period – better than generative art. Generative art takes full advantage of everything that computing has to offer, producing elegant and compelling artworks that extend the same principles and goals artists have pursued from the inception of modern art.

Geometry, abstraction, and chance are important themes not just for generative art, but for all art of 20th Century. As an art historian and an amateur generative artist, I see a clear line of influence on generative art starting from Cézanne and shooting straight through to the:

  • Fracturing of geometry in Analytical Cubism

  • Emphasis on technology, machine aesthetic, and mechanized production from Futurism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus

  • Introduction of autonomy and chance in Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism

  • Anti-figurative aesthetic, bold geometry, and intense color of Neoplasticism, Suprematism, Hard-edged Abstraction, and OpArt

  • Use of algorithms by Sol Lewitt and others

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_501″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 510.78125px”>  Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth  - Hilma af Klint, 1907

Group IV, No. 3. The Ten Largest, Youth – Hilma af Klint, 1907

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_523″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 475px”>  Suprematist Composition -  Kasimir Malevich, 1916

Suprematist Composition – Kasimir Malevich, 1916

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_541″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 392.953125px”>  Circles in a Circle  - Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

Circles in a Circle – Wassily Kandinsky, 1923

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_560″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 400px”>  Highway and Byways  - Paul Klee, 1928

Highway and Byways – Paul Klee, 1928

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_578″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 380px”>  Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)  - Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks) – Marcel Duchamp, 1935

<div class="image-block-wrapper has-aspect-ratio" data-description="Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941

” id=”yui_3_17_2_1_1542138966579_597″ style=”line-height: 0; text-align: center; position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-bottom: 410.203125px”>  Concentric Squares  - Josef Albers, 1941

Concentric Squares – Josef Albers, 1941